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Epilepsy


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We have a little boy just started in Nursery who has severe epilepsy. He is on medication to control his fits, but is still having several "absences". Yesterday myself and my two Nursery Nurses were given the training on what to do if he has a serious fit during Nursery. (he only started with us 2 weeks ago and his mum has been staying with him until our training could be arrranged).

We were all shown how to administer rectal valium which is what we would need to do if he is fitting for more than 5 minutes. The whole thing really scares me, and although I now have my "certificate" to say that I am competent to administer it, I am not sure what will happen when and if the situation arises.

 

Has anyone ever had to give rectal medication to a child during a session?

 

Jackie

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Hi

Although trainned to do it I have never had to, but have been there when it has been administered to hold/comfort child. It is quite scary, but when the situation arrises you will probably surprise yourself with how calm you are and you will be thinking about the child and not worrying about anything else.

Hope this is of some help, I would be quite willing to answer any other questions you have - although I am no expert!

 

Elfy

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Hi,

 

Ive been trained as well but never had to do it. The child we have often has absences but only has had 1 fit since starting in sept but that wasnt bad enough to need medication. Dont worry. Its like any first aid-you are a lot calmer when it happens than you think you will be.

 

 

Jo

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I understand what you feel since my husband has epilepsy, thankfully a lighter form and does not require that kind of treatment (only pills).

 

Just have one thing in mind that will help you keep calm: He needs your help for the medication and also for feeling secure with you; the seizure will be over soon; he is a child.

 

Just look at him with the love and a tenderness of a mum who cares for her child (we are all mums somehow of all of these children in our care :o ).

 

After the seizure is over, hold him tenderly within your arms so he can feel everything is okay. It takes them a while to completely recover.

 

Is there any Epilepsy Association in your area? I don't know how it is in the U.K., but in the U.S.A. they have it and they come to schools to orientate the staff and the children, with the parent's permission.

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Hi

We have a child in our pre-school with epilepsy, we have all had training on what to do and we have completed a risk assessment/health care plan, so far we haven't had to administer it. Hopefully if it happens we will go into automatic pilot, we had a child with a nut allegy, even if she touched someone who had eaten nuts she would have a reaction, we had an epipen on the premises. We did have to use this a couple of times and it was automatic. I'm sure it if happens you will automatically react and do the right thing. Good luck!!

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I have been trained and have administerd the medication on more than one occasion, the child I have is severly epileptic and has about three fits a week, not all whilst in my care. All I can say is that you do go into automatic pilot, try and stay calm, have one other person with you so they can record times etc (if an ambulance is called they ask what dosage has been given, what time, how long the fit lasted, what were the signs). i have now learnt what things can start a fit, the main one for my child is excitement and being over tired, for example if you have visitors in, parties, plays etc. Also aswell the change in temperature can start things off, if they get to hot or cold. Sorry if I am now alarming you, you will learn what starts your child off, you my be lucky and never eperience one. Heres hoping!

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