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we've been doing an audit of our resources and noticed we only have a small selection of positive images of people with disabilities, we have some books, puzzle and small world people.

we looked in the standard educational catalogues local high street book shops and ELC and there doesnt appear to be much more than the few books, puzzles and little people that we already have

 

where else can I get some some more resouces particulaly books and posters which contain positive images of disability?

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Have you got the Little Tikes School bus which comes with a wheelchair? A past ofsted inspector recommended it to me. Eduzone stock it in their babies and toddlers section for £14.95. I find it popular with my 3 and 4 year olds but its also safe for two year olds so its a useful toy.

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I get a lot of books from Amazon by searching something like 'children disabilities' or 'children special needs'. Amazon then suggests book after book to me, often with customer reviews too.

I also have a great poster from Mencap which is cheerful and colourful, but I can't remember how I got hold of that one.

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Thanks for the ideas,

 

Deb - I havent seen the little tikes bus I will have a look in toysRus they tend to have everything little tikes make...

 

Marion - thanks for the link to the other topic I was sure there was one somewhere but not been able to find it, I have found Balamory books were a start!

 

Posters are one thing we havent got, we have festivals and a variety of multicultural posters but only one dipicting disability I will have a look at mencap web site and some of the various other websites about disabilities. maybe if I email them someone might have a poster they want to send me??

 

Ive thought about creating my own poster with various images from the internet, catalogues and so on... Ill get the children to do it for an activity one morning they love to glue and stick, we can make a morning out of it and fill up a display board at the same time......

 

I must say I thought I had a reasonable amount of items until I actually looked through my cupboard gathered the items together to make a display and realised we had more equal opps than special needs.

 

Im still looking for ideas of ways to increase my resources so I am greatful for any other suggestions

 

Thank you

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Its interesting seeing it from another view point now I work with children with disabilities in a special school. Maybe there is money for school to be made, creating posters with our kids and selling them! My class alone have such different special needs, 5 in wheechairs, all different to their friends, 3 mobile, each with their own unique personality and looks.

Hmm maybe I should talk to SMT!!! Sorry I can't really help much in terms of offering good ideas.

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I think Nichola makes a good point in that posters don't actually illustrate the uniquness of individual children/people. Inclusiveness to me is more about positive attitudes and knocking down stereotypes. That is why I like the website about "real" people, enjoying real life. The teddy bear pics site shows how children could incorporate the concept of some disabilities into their small world role play, alongside an intuative adult to raise questions and discuss attitudes with the children whilst they play.

So many special needs are "invisible" and therefore cannot be "displayed", it is how we teach our children compassion, empathy and understanding for all that really counts.

 

Peggy

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I agree with your point Peggy, so many disabilities are invisible, displays and posters can only depict a few physical disabilities and not the whole child and their own special needs.

 

it was an outsider visiting our setting that had questioned what positive images we had for special needs , which prompted my audit of resources and a mini panic that we dont have lots and lots and lots of posters and books and toys we have a few and I will aim to increase these but Ill also look at what other ways we can make children aware of disabilities in a positive way.

 

Thanks for that Peggy you have got my brain thinking in a different way...

 

(loved the teddies site by the way)

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One thing I do which prompts discussion from nt children is to stick PECS symbols on furniture, objects and light switches etc around my home. I do it for the benefit of children with autism who I care for. They find the visual prompts helpful in their commuication.

It helps raise awareness naturally in the other children.

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PECS are fantastic if they are used correctly. Before moving to special Ed I had children with severe autism in my classes for 2 years running. We used PECS for our timetable at the start of the day and found that the rest of my class responded really well to them and it also meant they could communicate with one boy who was non verbal as they understood the symbols we used and what they meant such as if he wanted to play with a certain toy or go to a certain place in school.

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I like the pecs symbols, like cherylanne I think they work well to accompany words and labels around the room for all children not just those with special needs which helps to create a more inclusive environment plus the pictures are clearer to understand than ordinary clip art from the computer

 

I did get a link from another forum forsymbolworld

which lookes useful though Im not sure if the symbols on this site are official PECS symbols??

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