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Maths Planning Money


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xD:o:(

Can anyone help please with some maths planning on coin recognition.

Have gathered lots of visual resources from previous posts- thanks to all for sharing :):)

I really need some fresh ideas to use as group activities following the whole class teaching session.

And ......... if it's not asking too much

some number songs with money.

thanks

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Hi Tia

I use little film pots with lids on, anything similar will do. I put one of each coin inside. I give each child their own pot of money. We shake the pots, guess what's inside, open them and find each coin by description. So I'll say 'can you find the little round coin with a 1 on it' etc. Sounds really simple but they love it.

I also laminated some sheets of large squared graph paper with a picture of a coin at the bottom of each column. I give the children a tray of coins and ask them to sort them out, putting them in the right column. You end up with columns of coins, that they can count to find out which coin they've got the most/least of etc - good for sorting, coin recognition, counting and reading data!

I always use real coins as I find plastic money just doesn't work with young children, they need the real thing if possible.

Hope this helps

Debbie :):)

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I always use real coins as I find plastic money just doesn't work with young children, they need the real thing if possible.

50427[/snapback]

I completely agree with you. Also, real 1p pieces are cheaper than plastic 1p pieces! (Not sure about 2p coins, though).

 

The obvious song that springs to mind is 5 currant buns (can be adapted for different objects and for different prices).

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Hi. Don't know if this is any good, but it is an activity in the March 2006 issue of Nursery Education magazine. It's a bit long...!

 

Coin Sorting (sort coins by size, shape and colour)

 

Mathematical Development

 

Stepping Stone: Begin to talk about the shapes of everyday objects

ELG: Use language such as 'circle' or 'bigger' to describe the shape and size of solid and flat shapes.

 

Group Size: Small Group

 

What You Need: Small plastic bowls, coins of different values, PVA glue.

 

What To Do: Position a small table alongside the role-play bank with a pile of coins in the centre. Explain to the children that the money has been mixed up and needs sorting. Glue a different value coin inside the base of each bowl and encourage the children to sort the coins into the relevant bowls.

 

Suggest that other children who are involved in money-related activities bring their coins over to the sorting table when the have finished playing, and that children who are playing at the role-play bank come to replenish their supply when their coins run short.

 

Leave the children to explore resources freely and independently, introducing new ideas as they wish.

 

For Younger Children: Set up bowls for just 1p and 10p coins and provide children with a pile of these coins to make sorting easier.

 

Reception Extension: Encourage the children to develop their play by using the table as a role-play moeny exchange. Invite them to change coins, for example changing five 1p coins for a 5p piece.

 

Cross Curricular Links:

 

CLL - Extend their vocabulary, exploring the meaning and sounds of new words.

KUW - Look closely at similarities, differences, patterns and change.

 

 

I know its a bit long winded but it sounds simple enough to set up. It does say in the magazine that you should use play coins, but I agree that real money would be better. If the activity is closely supervised, the money shouldn't go missing! I know its cheeky, stealing an activity from a magazine, but I liked it because it clearly explains the links to other areas and ways in which you can adapt the activity according to the children's age/stage of development.

 

Clare

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Hi Tia

I use little film pots with lids on, anything similar will do.  I put one of each coin inside.  I give each child their own pot of money.  We shake the pots, guess what's inside, open them and find each coin by description.  So I'll say 'can you find the little round coin with a 1 on it' etc. Sounds really simple but they love it.

I also laminated some sheets of large squared graph paper with a picture of a coin at the bottom of each column.  I give the children a tray of coins and ask them to sort them out, putting them in the right column.  You end up with columns of coins, that they can count to find out which coin they've got the most/least of etc - good for sorting, coin recognition, counting and reading data!

I always use real coins as I find plastic money just doesn't work with young children, they need the real thing if possible.

Hope this helps

Debbie  :)  :)

50427[/snapback]

Thanks Debbie :)

It's the more able in my reception class I need to extend.

I hadn't thought of data handling/more or less seems so obvious now

Thanks again

Tia

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Hi. Don't know if this is any good, but it is an activity in the March 2006 issue of Nursery Education magazine.  It's a bit long...!

 

Coin Sorting (sort coins by size, shape and colour)

 

Mathematical Development

 

Stepping Stone: Begin to talk about the shapes of everyday objects

ELG: Use language such as 'circle' or 'bigger' to describe the shape and size of solid and flat shapes.

 

Group Size: Small Group

 

What You Need: Small plastic bowls, coins of different values, PVA glue.

 

What To Do: Position a small table alongside the role-play bank with a pile of coins in the centre. Explain to the children that the money has been mixed up and needs sorting. Glue a different value coin inside the base of each bowl and encourage the children to sort the coins into the relevant bowls.

 

Suggest that other children who are involved in money-related activities bring their coins over to the sorting table when the have finished playing, and that children who are playing at the role-play bank come to replenish their supply when their coins run short.

 

Leave the children to explore resources freely and independently, introducing new ideas as they wish.

 

For Younger Children: Set up bowls for just 1p and 10p coins and provide children with a pile of these coins to make sorting easier.

 

Reception Extension: Encourage the children to develop their play by using the table as a role-play moeny exchange. Invite them to change coins, for example changing five 1p coins for a 5p piece.

 

Cross Curricular Links:

 

CLL - Extend their vocabulary, exploring the meaning and sounds of new words.

KUW - Look closely at similarities, differences, patterns and change.

I know its a bit long winded but it sounds simple enough to set up. It does say in the magazine that you should use play coins, but I agree that real money would be better. If the activity is closely supervised, the money shouldn't go missing! I know its cheeky, stealing an activity from a magazine, but I liked it because it clearly explains the links to other areas and ways in which you can adapt the activity according to the children's age/stage of development.

 

Clare

50439[/snapback]

Thanks, especially for typing that all out!! It may be cheeky to steal an activity but I',m glad you did

Tia :)

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Hi Tia

With my more able Reception I have used addition cards. I have digital photos of groups of 1p coins, the children find a real coin to match each one in the photo and then count up how many altogether. They try writing down the amount if they are able to write numerals, and then I explain that we need to put a 'p' after the number to represent 'pennies'. If they can do this we have a go at equivalence by looking at a 2p coin and talking about it being worth the same as 2x1p. They can then go on to adding a 2p and 1p coins. I get them to find the 2p first and count on one more, two more etc depending on how many 1p coins there are.

 

Debbie

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We have shopping cards in our role play area - currently a garden centre. These are differentiated - eg. buy one red flower, buy one pack of seeds with picture clue on (prices are displayed on the items in the garden centre), or for the more able - buy a pack of seeds and a watering can. Children count out their starting money - usually 10p, and then go to the shop. There's lots of maths going on - counting, change, totals etc. This can be made more difficult by giving a 10p coin and then working out how to give change, but other than a couple in my class, I'm not sure the rest are ready for this. You can also give higher amount of money to start. It's quite easy to differentiate.

 

Harricroft

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Guest tinkerbell

Interactive whiteboard is really good for money work .We have easiteach maths .You or the children can drag big purses on the board and then put the coins in the purses, eg make me 5p in each purse.Because I teach r/y1 they either put all pennies or combinations of 1p 2p 5p...

You can also have toys with labeled amounts and the children find the coins.

I have made sheets of 4 piggy banks and got the children to stamp the amounts of pennies that i have written next to the pig.They love stamping.

Tinkerbellx

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