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Reading: Awareness of rhyme ...


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for rhyme, we make up a word that rhymes with their name, and if they know it is them, then that would be evidence towards it e.g. Zia (Mia). they may be able to identify rhyming words in a nursery rhyme/rhyming story. only need to show awareness however.

for alliteration we make up jingles about children and see if they know who it is for e.g. jolly ...... juggles juicy jellies (Jaydon), and ask why, and they will say that they all have/start with j. i hope! also we'll say things to prompt them to notice alliteration, e.g. Sophie's soggy sleeves etc

letters and sounds games give opportunity to assess, but i worry that children are memorising the fact that in silly soup all the toys rhyme, for example. sound box etc are good for modelling alliteration x

Edited by sooty99
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Rhyme is such a tricky one - some children don't hear it until they are well into Year 2. We give lots of chances for children to show that their ears are tuning in -

a puppet that gets the nursery rhymes wrong - children find this very funny if they are aware of rhyme

reading Dr Suess books and asking for suggestions for the next word - to rhyme with ...

rhyming soup from Letters and Sounds

spot the odd one out from a string of three or more - cat bat frog sat

passing the rhyming string round a small circle - not for a different word from each child and it doesn't need to be a real word

(I wouldn't do this while being observed - bit risky with the word generation!)

Somewhere in all this some children will really switch on to rhyming, find it very funny, and start to point it out in stories or CI activities, and that's when we say 'they've got it'.

 

Similarly with alliteration, though we leave a substantial gap between this and rhyming

getting children into groups whose names start with the same sound

sorting objects eg s / not s

The 'eureka moment' is often when someone says very proudly 'that's my letter'.

Just my ideas, sure others have more definitive ways of going about this, but I hope it helps.

Edited by marywilliam
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My group love;

Wibbly wobbly when an elephant sat on wen (Ben)

Wibbly wobbly when an elephant sat on wace (grace)

We tend let the adult lead it at circle time the children guess who's name it is then after a few weeks the children usually want to try it themselves. It's a simple but effective game that lends itself to this area x

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My group love;

Wibbly wobbly when an elephant sat on wen (Ben)

Wibbly wobbly when an elephant sat on wace (grace)

We tend let the adult lead it at circle time the children guess who's name it is then after a few weeks the children usually want to try it themselves. It's a simple but effective game that lends itself to this area x

Thanks - that sounds good - I will give it a try!

 

for rhyme, we make up a word that rhymes with their name, and if they know it is them, then that would be evidence towards it e.g. Zia (Mia). they may be able to identify rhyming words in a nursery rhyme/rhyming story. only need to show awareness however.

for alliteration we make up jingles about children and see if they know who it is for e.g. jolly ...... juggles juicy jellies (Jaydon), and ask why, and they will say that they all have/start with j. i hope! also we'll say things to prompt them to notice alliteration, e.g. Sophie's soggy sleeves etc

letters and sounds games give opportunity to assess, but i worry that children are memorising the fact that in silly soup all the toys rhyme, for example. sound box etc are good for modelling alliteration x

I tried this today - it worked really well and amused the children!

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