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Tapestry

Thinking Back To Yesteryear


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Our Literacy Co-ordinator has come up with the theme of

Childrens literature from the sixties in order to celebrate book week this year. (as it is also our 40th birthday)

I cannot think of anything from the sixties that the children would know other than Noddy?

Have any of you more mature members got any brainwaves?

I am completly stumped!

 

Michaelle

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Hi Michaelle,

Dr Seuss was late fifties and sixties I think

Sorry this is all I can think of (I'm sure someone will be able to come up with some more)

Jo

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Hi Michaelle

 

Nostalgia's not what it used to be, is it??

 

Remembering what a bookworm I was (and I was born in 1963) my favourites were Enid Blyton of any description, but I absolutely loved Milly, Molly, Mandy.

 

I vaguely remember a favourite book where the central character gets chicken pox or some other childhood illness requiring isolation. The mother brings out a box she keeps for such purposes: full of tactile, multi-sensory experiences to comfort the ailing. Once the illness is gone, the box and its contents are aired in the sunshine to remove all the germs, until the next time a child is ill and the box is brought out again. I only wish I knew what the book was and who wrote it.

 

But I don't remember the story books of my early years, sadly, so I can't help with your request.

 

But thanks for prompting this little stroll down memory lane!

 

Good luck with your search.

 

Maz

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Thanks Maz

 

OOOOOh how I used to love Milly, Molly Mandy!

Do you remember 'My naughty little sister'

And there was an Enid Blyton Character I used to love who was a little old man who stuck labels on naughty children's backs announcing their crimes to the world such as ' I stole the Jam' etc and the naughty children always got their come uppance.

Happy memories!

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Do you remember 'My naughty little sister'

37418[/snapback]

I think the reason I loved "my naughty little sister" is that she had such fun doing all the naughty things I was too straight laced to!

 

Made up for it later, I hasten to add!

 

I'm off to the library later to see what I can find - might just borrow a Milly Molly Mandy for old times' sake!

 

Maz

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Guest alisonjayne

Where The Wild Things Are was written in 1964 We love this book in our nursery. I loved Milly Molly Mandy books too what memories!

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OOhh! what memories! I loved My naughty little sister and was a great Enid Blyton fan, whether it was the mystery, secret seven, famous five, malory towers, the faraway tree, the wishing chair I loved them all!

 

Another favourite was Ant and Bee books, anyone remember them?? :D

 

I do clearly remember my first school reading book around 1960 - It was the Happy Venture scheme (brown and orange) and I still fondly recall, Dick and Dora, Nip the dog and fluff the cat! :D:D

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My favourite picture book was a story about a dog called "Spoodles", no idea of the author and cant remember anything particularly about the storyline either!

 

Also liked the Mabel Lucy Attwell stories.

 

My brother liked "Rupert" and "Thomas The Tank Engine".

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Janet and John...were they this era????

 

I loved Enid Blyton Secret seven / famous five.

 

Peggy

37450[/snapback]

 

 

Yes they were and I was one of those children who had to learn to read with Janet and John in ITA! What was all that about?

Edited by michaelle
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Janet and john, my naughty little sister (it was she, i think, who was ill in bed when the box of lovely things came out), milly molly mandy, the princess and the goblin, the secret seven, narnia, tom's midnight garden, the phoenix and the carpet, the little white horse........some of these were first published in the late 50's but I got to them in the 60's........still have many of them here now!!!

 

Don't recall picture books as such except miffy.

 

:o

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OOhh! what memories! I loved My naughty little sister and was a great Enid Blyton fan, whether it was the mystery, secret seven, famous five, malory towers, the faraway tree, the wishing chair I loved them all!

37433[/snapback]

Enid Blyton has had a profound effect on my life. I think one of the Mallory Towers books had a character who was pretending to be French. She was found out by saying 'quelle fromage' instead of 'quelle domage' when something drastic happened.

 

Even today I say 'quelle fromage' when something unexpected happens. Drives my children mad, which is an unexpected bonus, obviously.

 

I'm in the midst of a rosy glow of nostalgia.

 

Ahhhhhhhhhhhhh!

 

Maz

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Not really sure what I'm talking about, as I'm obviously far too young to remember, but... what about What Katy Did, and surely the Winnie T Pooh stories were around in the 60s? The Tiger who Came to Tea was 1968.

Noddy hasn't been the same since the Golliwogs left - that's what nostalgia does for you!

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Paddington, The Magic Roundabout and 'A whisle for Willy' by Ezra Jack Keats. The favourites that all children always loved and love though were The Magic Faraway Tree and Charlie and the chocolate factory. Hope you and your class enjoy them too.

Ruthanne :)

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Yes, I remeber Ant and Bee and someone else knows the little white horse. I still read that when I'm ill and I loved Mabel Lucy Atwell.I recognise so manyof the titles it's a great nostalgic trip in a rosy glowing world. I wonder what our children will remeber.

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