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Celebrating Birthdays


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I was just wondering how people celebrate childrens birthdays, i was thinking of making a pretend cake or have heard of a train with carriages and a candle in each, when it is there birthday candles are lit.

does anyone have any nice ideas to share?

 

charlotte :)

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We have a pretend cake with four candle holders in and put in the appropriate candles. They put their name on the birthday board and their age. We make a card during the session for them and all the staff sign it. When we sing happy birthday to them they then get the choice of loud or soft claps for their age.

 

They all seem to enjoy this and all children are made a fuss of not just the ones whoes parents bring a cake in for them to share.

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Something small but effective that I used to do in my last school was give each child a 'Happy Birthday' sticker and get the class to sing to them. All of them were very excited by that and couldn't wait to get one of my stickers (I'm a bit of a sticker queen so kids loved getting special ones from me!!)

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We have a pretend cake. For several years my deputy and I made a cake for any child's [and staff's] birthday when the parents hadn't volunteered to bring one in. It was really hard work but the children loved it. We took it in turns to make the cakes, but I must admit we were relieved if the parents offered, or if there were 2 birthdays on the same day.

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We get the birthday child to make their own cake out of either sand or playdough, helped by their keyworker. They can choose a toy car or silk flowers or anything else we have handy to put on top with the candles. This means each cake is unique and,oddly, the children always accept that they can't take the cake home-or eat it!

Deb W

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Montessori nurseries celebrate birthdays in a very special way and always involve parents/carers where possible.

 

Parents are asked to provide a note of key moments eg. day and time of birth, hospital or home, first smile, first tooth, first steps, info about siblings, house moves and anything else they consider important to their child.

 

On the day at circle time a giant felt sun is placed in the centre (it used to be a lighted candle but for safety reasons we had to stop that) This obviously represents the sun. On the sun mat is placed a small globe, cards for the birthday child, a balloon and a sticker and of course the birthday cake if provided or our own made out of plaster of paris.

 

Generally up to two family members are invited in to share this celebration but if that is not possible then photographs are always taken, which will be used in his personal time line which we start when children join the nursery and send home when they leave.

 

The birthday child is then invited to go to the mat and find his card/s which he opens and shows to everyone and passes to either his visitor or key worker to read out. He then returns to the mat for his sticker and balloon.

 

The child is then invited to make his birthday walk (there is no pressure and he can choose a friend to do this with or even his mum if he wants)

 

If he chooses to make the walk then he goes to the mat and picks up the globe. Obviously the sun mat represents the sun and the globe represents the earth. The child is invited to walk around the circle once for each year he has attained, replicating that the earth has travelled around the sun (say) four times since he was born. As the child walks, his keyworker reads out the words his parents have written. (These can be very tear jerky so tissues are always on hand)

 

When he has finished his birthday walk the candles are lit, everybody sings and the birthday child takes the sweetie tin around.

 

Sounds a bit long winded when I write it down but is really quite lovely when you see it in action.

 

:o Jane xD

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We give each of our Nursery children a present of a picture book for their birthday (The Book People have great offers on multi-packs of quality fiction books) The children also get a card with a home-made badge inside. When it's their birthday they are invited to sit in the teacher's chair at carpet time along with a specially chosen friend. They choose their favourite song for us all to sing. (nearly always Twinkle, Twinkle !) We then sing "happy birthday" and they blow out the candles on our home-made (biscuit tin covered with plaster of paris and decorated). They then choose another child to be Postman/lady. The Postperson puts on the hat and collects the sack and goes to the post box (in role play area) to collect any parcels there may be inside. They bring them back to the circle in the sack and knock loudly on the table. We all shout "come in Mr Postman / Mrs Postlady" and they deliver the parcel to the birthday child.

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We sing Happy Birthday and give each child a card, they blow out the candles, they can bring in one present to show. A number of families like to send in either cake or small fun size sweets. If it's sweets the children stand at the door at home time giving them out if it's cake we eat this at drink time. We have some birthday boy/girl hats they can wear if they choose.

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We have a child who is a jehovahs witness has anyone else experience of this and how did you deal with it please?

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This is an awkward one Andreamay. As you would feel bad leaving the child out. Maybe have a word with parent and ask their advise. you may get the same issues when it comes to Christmas. They may be able to suggest an alternative or compromise or something. I really dont know and dont want to show my ignorance or be insensitive. Better to ask if in doubt than feel awkward.

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I know there have been lots of discussions about JW children and celebrations but here's my tuppence ha'penny's worthin reponse to the query.

 

I think that adults can get more anxious about the perceived "missing out" that the JW child is having. However, experience has taught me that a JW child will generally have an awareness of what they do and do not take part in and often their parents will have discussed this with them too. I would explain we were going to be having a celebration of a birthday and that I know this is something that might make them feel uncomfortable. I would then invite them to choose their own activity with another adult, something they would like to do whilst the others were sharing the birthday - it's also sensible to talk through any possible approaches with their parents so everyone is clear about what will happen. A child I once taught would, in later years, come to school assembly, but take herself out to my office to read if she felt uncomfortable with the content. All the way through mum was consulted about sensible approaches so it never became a tricky issue.

 

clarity and sensitivity will help you manage the different approaches and perspectives families bring to many events we chose to celebrate. :)

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Thank you yes our experience is she does indeed understand she does not celebrate with us and we have a good open reationship with parents but in this last foundation year within pre-school I am concience of the fact the more time I spend on birthdays (for instance the theme of myself,we have a birthday train and talk about dates and months etc)the more she is excluded.christmas and easter etc isnt really a problem as she makes a general card.think I am worrying unessarily(sorry about spelling I am tired)

thanks again for your support

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