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Montessori help needed


DebbieW
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Hi...I am currently working towards EYPS. I have just completed my work experience in a 0 - 2years room in a full day care setting which follows the Montessori approach.

 

I am the manager of a village nursery which is a 'pack away' setting for children aged 2 - pre-school. So working with very little people was a very different experience for me and I enjoyed it very much.

 

I was interested in the Montessori activities that children were given and how they approached them. I was told that there are 26 steps to pouring and when I asked at what stage some of the children were at....the staff couldn't tell me.

 

Does anyone know what the 26 stages of pouring are?...as I would like to reflect upon this experience for a written task for EYPS, and would like to identify at what stage children were according to Montessori.

 

Thank you in anticipation

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Hi Sox...thanks for your reply and offer of help. The activity I observed was sand and rice being spooned into a jug with a funnel.

 

Could I have a look at both to see what the differences are? Are these activities always presented in a rigid way...i.e children are not able to explore the resources but must spoon and fill?

 

Thanks again

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Hi Sox...thanks for your reply and offer of help. The activity I observed was sand and rice being spooned into a jug with a funnel.

 

Could I have a look at both to see what the differences are? Are these activities always presented in a rigid way...i.e children are not able to explore the resources but must spoon and fill?

 

Thanks again

 

Sorry...... should qualify that a little further. I allowed the child to explore the resources including the bowl and jug. He wanted to cut out the spooning stage and concentrate on pouring from one to the other. The practitioner whilst making it clear I was doing something wrong also told me about the 26 stages of pouring. :mellow:

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Sorry...... should qualify that a little further. I allowed the child to explore the resources including the bowl and jug. He wanted to cut out the spooning stage and concentrate on pouring from one to the other. The practitioner whilst making it clear I was doing something wrong also told me

about the 26 stages of pouring. :mellow:

 

Haven't been part of Montessori setting for years! From reading presentation it is structured!

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Sox....thank you for going to that much trouble.

 

I find this fascinating and soooo structured....i can see why the practitioner was having a problem with me. :o...felt like a rebel though

which did feel good :1b

 

If it isn't ur normal setting shouldn't the practitioners have been guiding u on the ethos of the setting?

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we recently took the lids off our jugs as we realised the children could not see when the milk was about to come out - reflective practice and now makes the pouring easier for them :D not sure i can extend it to another 25 methods as we do all of that in our continous provision - as for being a rebel - i would be clased as one too !!

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Hi there

 

I am Montessori trained and work in a Montessori setting and have never heard it called 26 stages of pouring! Reading through Sox's attachments is helpful to know the different stages broken down into tiny steps, but I would add that it is impossible to expect to present exercises in silence to all children because if you did, many children I know would have got up and disappeared by step two! Each individual child will approach this activity in their unique way and it is for the practitioner to be sensitive to whether they are ready and exactly how it should be presented so as to maintain the child's interest and focus. I am currently working with 2-3s and we do dry pouring and encourage them to pour milk and water from glass jugs into real glasses at snack. Yes, Debbie W, it is very structured for teaching a specific skill, such as holding a jug and tipping it, but I generally find children respond to this consistent approach and quickly become confident pourers.

 

 

HTH

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And another thing - I generally present and then step back. If a child then wishes to explore and pour it all onto the tray for example, then soak it up with a sponge, that will be noted and then they may be directed to a sponge transferring or wiping activity at a later time. I love it when they find different ways to use the materials - it shows creativity!

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