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Wording In Safeguarding/child Protection Policy


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hi all just asking for a bit of advice r.e. wording recording an observation that isn't considered an immediate concern but still needs to be recorded as we are aware as staff that every little piece of the puzzle is recorded. We currently have quite heavy disclosure forms for recording a concern formally after completely re-doing the policy last year but feel that these are slightly too formal for observations that don't cause immediate concern, for example when a child comes into pre-school dirty/smelly- along those lines if you understand where I'm coming from. Recently attended a basic awareness course and the course leader recommended recording them in an incident book- all staff are happy with this but I need to now amend the policy to say but am struggling with my words and how to write that less concerning observations will be recorded in the incident book but without sounding too laid back or considering them less important, if that makes sense?

I've not wrote another policy before- every time I book on a course it gets cancelled. I feel I know what I want to write but am nervous that it comes across in the best way. We're due Ofsted which the leader and I are really quite nervous about, and I really want the policy to be as strong as possible as I've worked hard to get it re-wrote, nevermind for our staff and children's benefit and staff feeling confident in the policy should they ever need it. I can upload the current form and policy if that helps you understand what I'm trying to ask about

hope I'm making sense! If not, it is a Friday afterall! :o

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If staff have concerns that do not warrant an immediate referral, they will record them in the incident book.

 

Is that what you mean?

 

Do your parents ever have to sign the book e.g. if their child bit another? If so, how do you maintain confidentiality?

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How would you feel about being a little less specific in the policy i.e., saying that any concerns raised by the staff regarding safeguarding, no matter how minor or major are recorded/logged.

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From experience I would suggest using the concern form . A concern is just that and does not necessarily mean an immediate (or ever!) referral.

 

For us this method proved invaluable as the 'minor concerns' literally created a picture which built up over time. None of the individual concerns were 'big' but each one was recorded and stored in the same place and eventually resulted in the child being removed to a place of safety.

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Hi lolo yes thats exactly what I mean, I am just struggling to write this in the policy- how to word that there is a difference between the type of 'concern' and therefore how it is recorded.

Gezabel that's interesting that you say to record everything on a concern form as it creates a picture- its exactly why I was struggling to decide how to record little 'niggles'. Our concern form is currently quite a few pages long though so that it not only records accurately and in as much detail as possible but simultaneously supports and guides the staff in carrying out the procedure...how long is your concern form out of curiosity, as you were recording minor concerns on a frequent basis? As a staff team we had agreed that we would prefer a less formal record system alongside the concern form so I think I will standby the teams decision for now but will certainly bear what you said in mind, thank you for your words of advice.

We currently use a simple hard-back exercise book as an incident book, with each incident on a separate page so it can be removed if needed but I'm a little unsure about this continuing if it is then going to be used to record observations on children, not just incidents between the ch'ren etc. do you use a book or folder with individual incident forms?

Panders, I think I will use that phrase to introduce recording keeping thank you, as it is then clearly outlined that it will always be recorded in some format, whether staff feel it is a more pressing concern and warrants a concern form being completed or recording it in a incident book.

Thank you all for your help, will crack onto it now whilst I'm in the right frame of mind...oh how to spend a Saturday hey!

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Gezabel that's interesting that you say to record everything on a concern form as it creates a picture- its exactly why I was struggling to decide how to record little 'niggles'. Our concern form is currently quite a few pages long though so that it not only records accurately and in as much detail as possible but simultaneously supports and guides the staff in carrying out the procedure...how long is your concern form out of curiosity, as you were recording minor concerns on a frequent basis? !

 

Our 'basic' cause for concern form is one A4 sheet. At the top it has the setting's heading/logo and then Childs name, date of birth, parent/carer name, date of entry to preschool, then there is a 'choice' - date of incident/disclosure/cause for concern. There is then a big box taking up most of the sheet and at the bottom it is signed by the recording practitioner and signed by a witness

 

The incident covers any incident involving the child

disclosure usually relates to something a child has said/revealed

cause for conern is those little niggles

 

Each child has a personal folder in which these are stored in chronological order. The file is 'created' with the first sheet completed and the picture builds from there. Obviously if it is an obvious safeguarding issue a referral would be made.

 

After a lot of trying different methods this is the one that works for us, we used to have incident forms filed together and then cause for concern forms all filed together - it didn't work, when you wanted to look back at little joe bloggs we were leafing through loads of forms but now joe bloggs has his own folder and any incident or concern relating to him is there in one place. There is also no possible breach of confientiality in terms of another child's information being seen when looking at one child. All parents are aware of this form and told when we complete one. We brought this systmem in a few years ago (something I did as part of my OU study) and it has receieved positive responses from social services, early years advisor and OFSTED primarily because it is succinct and enables quick and easy access to those who need it but as I say it is really what works for you.

 

If the concern is lengthy then we just add a second sheet to continue recording the details - hope this isn't garbled!

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Oh that sounds very organised and quite brilliant Gezabel, I might actually steal your idea if you didn't mind- I love the idea of less paper being used for a form that can be multi-functional, sounds so much less hassle too, think will keep our more intense forms alongside for disclosures but use your idea for an incident/cause for concern form, hope you don't mind, and thank you for sharing

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Oh that sounds very organised and quite brilliant Gezabel, I might actually steal your idea if you didn't mind- I love the idea of less paper being used for a form that can be multi-functional, sounds so much less hassle too, think will keep our more intense forms alongside for disclosures but use your idea for an incident/cause for concern form, hope you don't mind, and thank you for sharing

 

Oh no of course I don't mind, only sorry I haven't got one stored on my home pc or I would have uploaded it for you.

 

It's actually a very simple idea but I often find that these are the ones that work best!.

 

Under our old system we wanted to find a cause for concern for a particular child but it was a nightmare! We all recalled the concern but were trying to remember when it was to enable us to find the form quicker! now anything we need for a child is in their folder, probably solved.

These folders are kept in a locked filing cabinet for which senior staff have a key

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