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I have been reading up on different educational and psychological theories about how children learn (5 different approaches to teaching and learning). I am trying to develop a perspective of the Italian approaches to early childhood development against the EYFS Guidance materials in particular.

 

Although I follow the guidance materials, some of the methods used in my setting "weave in" aspects of the Reggio Emilia approach- the idea of open-ended questioning and posing problems, in addition to placing myself in a role as a "learning partner". I have to say, I am favouring much of this approach, but am aware this has not had a favouring response to the forum before!

 

Having researched upon the Swedish early years approach, and the freedom of the child to be a child, I feel we have something missing in our own approaches over here!! Am I alone??

 

Sxx

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Although I follow the guidance materials, some of the methods used in my setting "weave in" aspects of the Reggio Emilia approach- the idea of open-ended questioning and posing problems, in addition to placing myself in a role as a "learning partner". I have to say, I am favouring much of this approach, but am aware this has not had a favouring response to the forum before!

 

 

See, I would say this is an EYFS approach - Active Learning/ Sustained shared thinking.

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Very briefly I would say that sustained shared thinking, open ending learning building on children's interests, and the adults in the setting being the children's learning partner or 'knowing other' is very much part of the EYFS approach, which I think we all would agree with. Small groups with a key person, lunchtimes and wraparound planned as part of the whole approach so that the children have consistent experiences, recognises the needs of young children. The Reggio Emilia approach is one we may hold up as an ideal, but is not necessarily sustainable in our settings because of the way they are staffed and funded and because of our particular culture.

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