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Help Needed For Observation


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I have got an early years advisor coming and observing my lesson> I am thinking of teaching pattern and relating it to easter eggs. I feel that I need a context for the children to respond to? Please help would love suggestions I never get anyone reply to my posts. This observation is so important and I want it to be reaaly great. Also would like ideas on shared sustained thinking ??

 

Thanks

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Hi Katie, I think you are right you need a context but I also think Easter could be a bit early yet.

Have a look at the bedfordshire maths site at the reception planning there as there are some lovely ideas that might help you.

 

Alternatively, is there a story you could focus on. Elmer is good for pattern if carefully taught. Think about what aspect of patterning that you are going to focus on though.

 

Good Luck.

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Yes its hard Easter isn't officially until then end of the holidays when they come back to school. I think Susan is right about using a story like Elmer which is great for patterns. Are you Reception or Nursery? What kind of pattern making are you thinking copy and continuing, getting them to think of their patterns? i would expect my HA to be making their own patterns now using a couple of criteria like size and colour (i.e. the compare bears/elephants) my LA may just be copy and continuing a 2/3 colour pattern.

 

Going for a pattern hunt around school/grounds/outside - could use camera to take photos and then share them to talk about patterns you have seen. Looking at patterns in the environment spider webs/bees nests, patterns of bricks etc

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Hi there kl33, I think it might help if you start with what you want the children to achieve. For example, is your focus going to be on copying or continuing pattern, or on the language used to discuss patterns; or on recognizing them?

 

I did a whole theme on pattern once, in which we looked at patterns in words, music, dance, as well as in the environment, animal patterns, and in number; etc, the breadth of this is potentially enormous.

 

Elmer is great but also 'My mum and dad make me laugh' is a good one too.

 

If I was introducing pattern, I often used to start with a discussion with the children as to what they think a pattern actually is. Their responses are quite revealing! Then I would have lots of different patterns to look at (wrapping paper, material, etc just as eggwoman suggests)

 

Im being nosey, but ust wondering also why this observation is particularly important to you?

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'My mum and dad make me laugh' is a good one too.

 

I always forget about that one but could be just what you want if your children are very young!

 

You will need to think about where you are in the sequence of your lessons too--pattern is an enormous concept as it can embody so much SO dont try and do too much all at the same time, hence your focus.

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Guest LornaW
Also would like ideas on shared sustained thinking ??

 

Thanks

 

Hi kl33

 

Early Education do a great DVD on Shared Sustained Thinking but in the meantime here are some bullet points from the ppt given at a TACTYC conference I attended with Iram Siraj-Blatchford some years ago that you may find useful. I think this is the type of things good practitioners do without realising it is called Shared Sustained Thinking!!!

 

•tune in:

listen carefully to what is being said, observing body language and what the child is doing

•showing genuine interest:

giving your whole attention, maintaining eye contact, affirming,smiling, nodding

•respecting children’s own decisions and choices inviting children to elaborate:

‘I really want to know more about this’

•re-capping:

‘So you think that…’

•offering your own experience:

‘I like to listen to music when I cook supper at home’

•clarifying ideas:

‘Right Darren, so you think that this stone will melt if I boil it in water?’

suggesting:

‘You might like to try doing it this way’

•reminding:

‘Don’t forget that you said that this stone will melt if I boil it’

•using encouragement to further thinking:

‘You have really thought hard about where to put this door in the palace but where on earth will you put the windows?’

•offering an alternative viewpoint:

‘Maybe Goldilocks wasn’t naughty when she ate the porridge’

•speculating:

‘Do you think the three bears would have liked Goldilocks to come to live with them as their friend?’

reciprocating:

‘Thank goodness that you were wearing wellingtonboots when you jumped in those puddles Kwame. Look at my feet they are soaking

wet’

•asking open questions:

‘How did you? Why does this..? What happens next? What do you think?’

•modelling thinking:

‘I have to think hard about what I do this evening. I need to take my dog to the vet’s because he has a sore foot, take my library books

back to the library and buy some food for dinner tonight. But I just won’t have time to do all of these things’

 

Lorna

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Hi Katie, I think you are right you need a context but I also think Easter could be a bit early yet.

Have a look at the bedfordshire maths site at the reception planning there as there are some lovely ideas that might help you.

 

Alternatively, is there a story you could focus on. Elmer is good for pattern if carefully taught. Think about what aspect of patterning that you are going to focus on though.

 

Good Luck.

 

Where abouts on bedofordshire maths site I can't find it ?

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Guest Spiral

Hi Katie,

just wanted to wish you the best of luck. Maybe choose what you are comfy with and have had a bash at before as it shows you are confident and have a very good understanding,

 

enjoy,

Spiral.

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Where abouts on bedofordshire maths site I can't find it ?

 

Sorry Karen, I misinformed you but have a look at the year1 blocks--there are some ideas you might be able to adapt within the short term plans.

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