Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

School Starting Age


langler2102
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi

Hope some of you out there can help!! I am currently carrying out some research on the single intake (children starting school the term after they are four) looking at the effect this may have not only on the children's well-being but also the impact this may have on teaching staff and their roles. I will be carrying out interviews in a maintained sector but have only presently managed to agreement for the interviews to take place in one school setting.

I am looking for anyone who is interested in taking part in the 'interview' questions so that I can gather a wider audience of opinions. My research questions is:‘School Readiness: What are the perceptions of school readiness of teaching and non teaching staff within the Early Years Sector?’

I have uploaded the questions I will be using in the interview and would appreciate some of your opinions??

Thanks

Langler2102

Interview_questions_researchEL.doc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a comment that whilst some authorities have a three term intake some others have had a one point intake for over 10 years so it is not an issue if that is what has happened. It is nothing new. I would not really see it as 'school readiness' whatever that may be, but rather the school's ability to be able to plan for the needs of the children within the reception class, some of whom are just four years old at the beginning of term. Surely it is about appropriate provision.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you looking for particular people to respond? I mean purely reception teachers/TAs or also parents or other practitioners such as nursery staff (who sometimes feel children leaving them aren't ready for school...)

Hi, I am looking for responses from any teaching or non teaching staff within the private, maintained or any other setting dealing with Early years and transition.

Langler2102

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a comment that whilst some authorities have a three term intake some others have had a one point intake for over 10 years so it is not an issue if that is what has happened. It is nothing new. I would not really see it as 'school readiness' whatever that may be, but rather the school's ability to be able to plan for the needs of the children within the reception class, some of whom are just four years old at the beginning of term. Surely it is about appropriate provision.

Thank you for your comments, that is precisely the point when do practitoners and teaching staff regard children as 'ready for school' I am sure just this question alone will raise some debateas opinions will differ. I am aware that other local authorities have had a single intake system for some time but this has only just been made policy as a result of the Rose review which is why I think it is current and relevant. I agree it is about appropriate provision but also appropriate attitudes of teaching and non teaching staff in order to offer the best type of provision for the youngest school starters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi, I am looking for responses from any teaching or non teaching staff within the private, maintained or any other setting dealing with Early years and transition.

Langler2102

 

 

I would certainly be happy to take part and I will ask our Reception team too.

 

Jacquie, everyone is entitled to their opinion and I do see your point but surely the point of research is to pursue different avenues of thought... Just because something has happened for 10 years doesn't mean it's right or effective. I do understand what you're saying about 'appropriate provision' but looking at the HUGE range of abilities in our reception class I think it is naive to believe that a teacher and (if they're lucky) a TA (who may be inexperienced/unqualified or simply not competent) can accommodate the needs of up to 30 children that are barely 4, immature (sometimes still in nappies) and/or unwilling to participate right up to those that may be just 5, bright, literate, competent and/or eager to learn. We struggle enough to meet the needs of 60 children (26 at a time) between 7 staff (4 in at a time) in nursery and we have loads of support from advisers, school and sometimes parent helpers too.

 

I'm sorry but it's something I feel passionately about from my own experiences as a parent and a practitioner. One size does not fit all and I wish the EYFS would be extended so children move to more formal learning when they reach a point on the EYFS rather than right that's it they're 5 at some point this year BANG school.

 

Sorry again, I'm in a foul and emotional mood :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would certainly be happy to take part and I will ask our Reception team too.

 

Jacquie, everyone is entitled to their opinion and I do see your point but surely the point of research is to pursue different avenues of thought... Just because something has happened for 10 years doesn't mean it's right or effective. I do understand what you're saying about 'appropriate provision' but looking at the HUGE range of abilities in our reception class I think it is naive to believe that a teacher and (if they're lucky) a TA (who may be inexperienced/unqualified or simply not competent) can accommodate the needs of up to 30 children that are barely 4, immature (sometimes still in nappies) and/or unwilling to participate right up to those that may be just 5, bright, literate, competent and/or eager to learn. We struggle enough to meet the needs of 60 children (26 at a time) between 7 staff (4 in at a time) in nursery and we have loads of support from advisers, school and sometimes parent helpers too.

 

I'm sorry but it's something I feel passionately about from my own experiences as a parent and a practitioner. One size does not fit all and I wish the EYFS would be extended so children move to more formal learning when they reach a point on the EYFS rather than right that's it they're 5 at some point this year BANG school.

 

Sorry again, I'm in a foul and emotional mood :o

Thank you Hello Kitty it would be great to have your feedback on the questions, I am also very passionate about the impact on the children and the teaching/non teaching staff and have experienced first hand the effect beginning formal learning can have on children as a parent, and the frustration facing many practitioners trying to accomodate different levels of maturity within nursery and reception classes. Looking forward to hearing yours and your teams opinions. Thank you x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't be sorry Hello Kitty, and at the end of the day it depends on our experiences and our ability to influence practice. I agree that there are lots of problems for those introducing children into a reception class where the provision is influenced by people who are not EY's friendly. That is a problem of an individual schools practice and provision though isn't it? Where they are knowledgeable and understanding and the staff ratios are good, rather than one adult to 3O, then neither the parents or children have anything to fear. Regarding reception as 'formal' would mean that that class was not following the requirements of the EYFS. Many children are in full time provision before they are school entry age. After all this is possible from 12 weeks old in care settings. If we are planning for each child as an individual and following the EYFS, then we plan for the child not the age, and this should be possible in a school reception class just as much as in a setting providing for children under rising 5. In a school with a nursery there are many ways in which provision can be seamless, whether as a combined unit or by thoughtful transition.

I think the EYFS has meant that many reception classes have actually moved backwards in terms of staffing, as it did not make it mandatory to have a TA as well as a teacher, which does affect practice. This is something which I think we all feel should be addressed in the review, but I suspect financial considerations are behind this rather than the needs of the children. Those schools which put their youngest children as a priority have continued to provide good ratios. Some schools have had other priorities.

Just to add that I replied to this as the heading was that it was a 'new single intake', which it may be for some, but it isn't new for many of us in our LA's, and I would argue the point that I was providing good provision and care for my children, as individuals, including dealing with intimate care where it was required, although this was usually dealt with and solved in our nursery, in an inner town school with an average of 35% free school meals and 15% EAL and a very wide variety of abilities.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)