Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Templates


 Share

Recommended Posts

We are not aloud to use any templates in the setting. Children have to drow and cut everything by themselves. I understand that product is not important, it is the proces. but, for example, if learning objectiv is math and we making ladybird with spots it is going to be frustreting that we make children to do shape that they can't. Some of our children haven't got sccissors skils.

Local school use templates!

What do you think? I am interested to see are everybody else working under same rule?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Kit-kat

 

We do avoid using templates, especially for creative activities.

 

However, there is a lot of physical skill involved in using templates: holding them steady, using the pencil to draw around them, possibly swapping hands over half way round.

 

In your mathematical activity example I would rather the children used a template to make the ladybird quickly and then move onto the counting part than get so frustrated because they couldn't draw the ladybird they lose interest and wander off.

 

Maz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are discouraged from using templates too (Reception) - although as Maz has rightly said there are skills that are developed through using a template. Perhaps you could provide different sized templates with some round some oval so children could still have a choice of shape that their ladybird was going to be?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've found that the children get frustrated if they can't master the skill of "changing hands" whilst using a template and they also think this is the correct/only representation of an animal, object, shape etc.

 

I provide a few templates in our office area, for children to use as they wish to, but never use them for a particular focused activity.

 

Peggy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We do have some shape templates, I would also give children who cannot use scissors ready cut shapes and sticky dots for this type of maths activity - but this is NOT art. The danger is that we impose our own perception and interpretation on to children by providing them with pre drawn shapes or templates. I would however use real leaves as templates.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it depends what the objective/focus of the activity is.

If it is mathematics, I cant see any harm in giving children a ready made ladybird (or template) that they can stick or draw the correct number of dots on, or shaped paper as a stimulus for their creative writing. Providing there is a balance and the children have ample opportunities to develop their creativity and key skills through appropriate activities their individuality wont be stifled!

Sometimes we can get a bit too hung up on things.

We had a similar dilemma when it came to mothers day cards for example, should it be all the childrens own work or is it ok to give them things to assemble? as time was a priority this time and I had been a bit over ambitious in designing a 3D pot of anemones I opted for the latter and although it was a bit like a production line at the time, no two turned out the same and the children were delighted with them. (I compromised by putting out card, scissors, glue, glitter sticky and tissue paper in the making area and the children made their own cards in a vaguely similar way!!! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I feel better knowing that you share your oppinion with me.

Idea about using real leaf is good, I will try that.

I also think as long as we do not using them constantly what is the harm.

Children still geting out of it, but we been told not to have them at all in the setting. I do not agree with that :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
Guest LucyQ

We have scissors out all of the time in our craft area so the children can use and cut up whenever they feel like it.

 

We also have made a cutting board which is used occassionally and consists of, I suppose, templates but they are very simply - long, thin pieces of paper with different length straight lines - some short so one snip does the job - some longer so more snips required.

Then there are spirals, squares, zig-zags etc for more advanced snippers.

I think it is a Montessori idea - very simple but a good aid if used alongside other cutting opportunities.

 

The children love making little packets of snips to take home - I always warn the parents so they don't get snips all over the sittingroom/ or car!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LucyQ:

 

This is a great way for children to experience success in cutting! I agree with you about having scissors readily available, too - children need lots and lots of practice - even if it does mean sweeping up lots of little bits of paper a hundred time a day.

 

Maz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As regards scissors ( and being a playleader who provides children with them as basic provision) my daughter, aged 4, has lovely holey trousers this week. :D:D Should I be proud of her ability??? :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Obviously a budding fashion designer, Beau!

 

Mind you I'm a little biased about th provision of scissors. At about four I cut all the flowers out of my curtains and mattress with my mum's sewing scissors. I've been snipping and chopping ever since!

 

Maz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Holey trousers Beau - she is obviously a trend setter......... but I agree with what has been said - I have a whole load of templates - mainly for my benefit actually and they do go out on the table occasionally - the children use them if they want to - we don't insist that they do neither do we encourage them to use them. Interestingly enough you can anticipate those children who are most likely to pick them up before they even get to the table, normally the children who don't cover their hands, legs and arms in paint, those who don't like using the PVA glue let alone sitting there for hours picking it all off, those that don't mix paints together to make that lovely brown mess -why is it no matter what colours you put out they can always make this colour!!! Their paintings and drawings are always very ordered so yes I do use them but as someone else says I never focus an activity around them. Some children like them but when they are not out I have never heard anyone say "oooh can we have the rabbit template out"!!!

Nikki

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)