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Treasure Baskets


Guest Pandora
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Guest Pandora

Hi everyone, new here :o

 

Just doing some research into treasure baskets and was looking for thought on what are the top 5 items you feel every treasure

basket should contain. - most effective items

Also interested in what you think is the least effective item(s) in any treasure basket - if any?

 

Thanks

Katie

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I'm currently doing agency work and working with 1 to 2 year olds yesterday, they particularly played with wooden rings (variety of thickness) and wooden mug holders, empty tin pots and baby food lids, small wooden dishes - combining most of these things especially putting in and out of pots, knocking out of pots and pushing pots and rings in response to observed rolling. After initialy touch, items such as loofahs didn't seem to get explored much.

Edited by Guest
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Hi I did a course recently with Sally Thomas where she raved about the benefits of treasure baskets. We were told to try and steer away from plastic as it does nothing for the senses especially if it is for young children/babies as it all goes in the mouth. Metal and wooden items are great, the cold of the metal etc. I am currently trying to but some themed baskets together. I think the favourite with my children at the moment is the wooden one with various size wooden spoons. Hope that is of some help :o

 

 

Tink69

Edited by Tink69
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Hello Katie,

We have many teasure baskets in my setting, that include wooden spoons, kitchen roll holders so the children can develop hand eye co-ordination putting wooden curtain rings ( various sizes) on them. We managed to find a large water cooler bottle and filled it with corks so the children could shake them out and then f they wanted post them back in the bottle again. Metal sives for the children to make sounds using the wooden spoons or anything else they get their hands on. Textured materials, sand paper, wooden pegs for the children to slide them onto thin edges. boxes, basically lots of things that they can experiment with. To get the children really interested split your treasures into different wicker baskets, for example, wooden things, textured materials, even a bathroom basket with things that we find in bathrooms. One basket i found the children enjoyed was a fruit basket, collecting different fruits such as a mango, apple, orange, lemons and limes- fruits that have a scented skin placed them in a basket then carved a few small holes in some of the fruits for the children to smell and taste, kept them amused for ages untill they found the lemons and limes. But great opportunities for practitioners to capture some fantastic observations, sharing, investigating, communicating, expression etc. I could go on, but i hope this ideas get you inspired. Take a look at the little book of treasure baskets, that has some fab ideas in that.

Becky x :o

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