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I'd really like to do some extensive work with a puppet in my classroom, particularly as many of the children are EAL and find this sort of approach less threatening but I don't know how to start----other than get a puppet!

 

I do have a puppet that I use for circle time activities, telling "news" but don't feel comfortable developing this.

I'd like to buy a really special "friend" but don't want to spend the money if its only going to sit on the shelf.

Have you seen the spectacular puppets on "puppetsbypost"?

I've been inspired by Ros Bayley, who I've heard speak a few times.

 

Can any one help?

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Hi Steve,

 

Thanks for your reply.

I had seen the first post but not the second, Helen's experiences are exactly those that I am concerned about replicating and don't want to!

 

I'd really like to have a puppet to use all the time, to encourage interaction & attention etc, not only when discussing emotions. I'm not quite sure how to relate to an animal so was thinking of a boy/girl, but not anything too ugly. I don't like the widemouthed ones that I've seen.

 

Susan

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Hi Susan,

I think you're right about the wide-mouthed ones! I really thought they were cute, but as you have read in my other post, some of the children didn't agree :D By having them around in the nursery, the nervous children are OK now, but I did have one parent tell me how ugly these puppets were and how it wasn't surprising that her daughter cried when she saw it.

Good luck with your choice. I haven't given up, and am still thinking about using them in circle time to discuss certain issues. One thing I plan to do next term is to take the puppets out and about in our town and take photos of them in familiar places. The children can then recognise the places that they go to, eg Tesco (!), the park, High Street, castle, river, etc. and it may allow them to pretend again that these puppets are just a little bit real and that they have fun around Lewes, too :)

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  • 2 weeks later...

The Pre-School I have just left introduced a bird called Crispin (big yellow thing with long dangly legs) for circle time. The children were slightly apprehensive to start with so, armed with a camera, the staff took pictures of Crispin in a tree (where he lives) and various landmarks around the town that the children would recognise (McDonald's, the local library, the swimming baths with his armbands on, and supermarkets). We couldn't have known what an impact this would have on the children, especially when, one day Crispin came in with a bandage on his leg! He'd fallen out of his tree. The children were all in awe of this yellow bird who, like them, had accidents. The scope of imaginative conversation between even the quietest members of the group was amazing. He became so popular that the children now 'book' Crispin to take on day trips at weekends, and fill in his diary of where and what he did. Some parents even take photo's that are added to his photo album which is on display on our interest table. Ofsted were very impressed (parental involvement), and covers so many areas of learning. A highly recommended resource! :o

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Im glad I saw this topic. I have been meaning to buy a nice puppet over the summer but I have not seen any that I really like. I went to the mentioned website (puppetsbypost) and I could not decide which one to buy there were so many lovely ones there. I eventually decided on the crow one and can't wait to get it (sad I know). I will be doing the photo idea for sure!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi, xD

 

I use puppets in my class for all sorts of things, I have some that help with counting (a squeaky bird for example), but my best and favourite one is a speech therapists doll that has signing hands. She is quite large and has a nice face and the hands and arms are like long gloves so you are able to manipulate them.

 

She sits on my knee during story time and tells the story, or becomes part of the story. I find this useful because I need to sign to my special needs class, but when I have gone into mainstream schools to do outreach work, the mainstream children all love her and she then just uses her hands to emphasise what is being said etc.

 

I find it important that puppet resources are kept as teacher resources not played with generally, or the children don't take you seriously.

 

Also, I learned at a puppet workshop that when using a hand puppet you should hold it up high enough that you can make eye contact with it when you are talking. by doing this it takes on a real persona and becomes a little character that is more realistic.

 

sorry, this all sounds a bit daft when I write it down, but it really works and the children love it. If you can get on a puppet workshop it is good fun and will help. :o

 

Rosie :(

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