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Promote Sustained Shared Thinking And Listening Skills


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I also started my FD in September and I really struggle linking theorists with my work. This module I have to do an interactive display and link it with either communication literacy or language..........and of course the theorists have to be in there also in my assignment.

 

I thought of my target child ... want to develop sustained shared thinking and listening skills........... now does this come under communication...language or literacy? I have to focus on one of those even though they are all interlinked.

 

My display is going to be around the seaside as that is his interest...sand and water.

 

Any suggestions what I could include in my display to encourage sustained shared thinking and listening skills? and equally important what theorist... Bruner...Vygotsky..Chomsky? who... as u can see I am totally lost in this maze of learning lol

 

Any suggestions to guide me here would really be appreciated.

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As you say all three CLL interact but I think if I were looking at sustained, shared thinking I would go for communication with language a good second contender. You can concentrate on one but mention the other as you can’t really have one without the other.

 

Very briefly, very simplified, and off the top of my head, as it is a while since I looked at the three you mention:

 

Chomsky maintains that our brains are programmed to acquire language, and there are inherent rules of grammar which are common to all languages.

 

Vygotsky— children learn by interacting with a ‘knowing other’ who can be an adult or a peer, so that fits in with SST. Learning is a social activity. Working with the ‘knowing other’ is also a way of ‘scaffolding learning’, which is a phrase coined by Bruner. Again for SST this is interacting with the child to consolidate and extend the thinking and learning, and narrating what is happening to support memory and understanding. Bruner emphasises the importance of talk, culture and social interaction for the construction of knowledge, and that the context for learning must be meaningful.

All the theorists believe that children learn best by hands-on activity. Don’t forget Piaget, who also emphasised the importance of practical learning activities. He maintained that children go through stages of development, and until they are successful in one stage they cannot move on to the next.

 

My favourite quote from Vygotsky

 

“ In their play children project themselves into the adult activities of their culture and rehearse their future roles and values. Thus play is in advance of development, for in this manner children begin to acquire the motivation, skills and attitudes necessary for their social participation, which can be fully achieved only with the assistance with their peers and elders”

 

 

Hopefully someone will come along with a bit more on this. Have a look through your reading list as you will find many books on early learning will refer to these theorists.

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Thank you so much for your help here, you have given me a lot to think about here and I know you have been very helpful, thank you so much.

 

 

 

 

 

As you say all three CLL interact but I think if I were looking at sustained, shared thinking I would go for communication with language a good second contender. You can concentrate on one but mention the other as you can’t really have one without the other.

 

Very briefly, very simplified, and off the top of my head, as it is a while since I looked at the three you mention:

 

Chomsky maintains that our brains are programmed to acquire language, and there are inherent rules of grammar which are common to all languages.

 

Vygotsky— children learn by interacting with a ‘knowing other’ who can be an adult or a peer, so that fits in with SST. Learning is a social activity. Working with the ‘knowing other’ is also a way of ‘scaffolding learning’, which is a phrase coined by Bruner. Again for SST this is interacting with the child to consolidate and extend the thinking and learning, and narrating what is happening to support memory and understanding. Bruner emphasises the importance of talk, culture and social interaction for the construction of knowledge, and that the context for learning must be meaningful.

All the theorists believe that children learn best by hands-on activity. Don’t forget Piaget, who also emphasised the importance of practical learning activities. He maintained that children go through stages of development, and until they are successful in one stage they cannot move on to the next.

 

My favourite quote from Vygotsky

 

“ In their play children project themselves into the adult activities of their culture and rehearse their future roles and values. Thus play is in advance of development, for in this manner children begin to acquire the motivation, skills and attitudes necessary for their social participation, which can be fully achieved only with the assistance with their peers and elders”

 

 

Hopefully someone will come along with a bit more on this. Have a look through your reading list as you will find many books on early learning will refer to these theorists.

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