Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Wallbars


 Share

Recommended Posts

I don't think there are 'legal' limits in terms of age and height. There are however requirements for the type of surfacing which corresponds to the height the children may potentially fall from. You should have carried out a risk assessment, make sure there are suitable mats under the bars according to the height of them, and teach the children how to use them safely and responsibly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have a chat with your PE co-ordinator as the co-ordinator should have all the information and appropriate risk assessments for all the equipment. If the bars are designed for the younger end of school you should not have any worries about how high they are going on them, as the children find their own level. In PE lessons mats under climbing equipment are not to be used as they may encourage children to jump off the equipment. This link give a summary of the safety advice

https://czone.eastsussex.gov.uk/county_info...t.asp?item=1205

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's what I thought about mats - in theory they should be placed where you want children to jump off apparatus and children should be taught to climb up and down carefully/safely.

 

Apparently if you tell children to go only as high as they feel confident, and can climb down from, they will do just that. Not syre how that works with the children who have little concept of risk or what is sensible - but seems to work well for the majority!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We found that go as high as you feel safe works in the forest so I reckon it should work on the wall bars also!

 

Have fun!

 

Lorna

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest jenpercy

We had no mats round our (indoor) climbing frame and the only child ever to fall off did so in front of an OFSTEDc Inspector!! who berated us for not having mats. Now, our climbing frame is modualr with the children constantly rebuilding it so it travels round the room in its many incarnations, which makes it a nightmare regarding mats - even though we make the childrenresponsible for their own safety checks.

 

Also they often play tag etc r0uond the frame and they are in more danger from tripping over the mats when running!!

 

it's really great to have it confirmed that they are not necessary!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest jenpercy

No children are usually very competant and don't normally go beyond their limits. You should, of course, never call out to be careful as this makes them self-conscious and may cause an accident. If you are concerned, move unobtrusively to a position where you can catch if necessary, but it won't be in 99 cases out of 100.

 

Another rule I have is that children are not allowed to help each other. I have seen one child support another by holding on below the knees and then the first child let go of monkey bars, folded up at the knees and hit head smack on the floor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wouldn't there be a difference though between wall bars, which are essentially gym apparatus designed for climbing, and a climbing frame on which younger children play?

 

Yes Beau as you say, a big difference. In a PE lesson it is a tightly structured and supervised activity and children are taught the safety rules from the very start. Quite different from children playing and choosing freely in an outdoor area, where different safety arrangements apply like soft surfaces. Jenpercy would you be using yours for a structured lesson or is this part of your after-school club, as the regulations would be different in the latter case?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)