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mps09
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As part of my Foundation Degree I am studying the Statutory Welfare Requirements (and very interesting reading it is too!) :(

 

The legal requirements for information and compaints states:-

 

Parents must be given free access to developmental records about their child (for example the EYFS profile)

 

and I was just wondering how other people achieve this?

 

In my setting profiles and evidence/observations are kept in individual folders in the filing cabinet and parents are reminded via the newsletter that they are welcome to ask to have a look at their child's file. We also have a 'helping hand' each day, after which parents get a review of their child's progress and details of next steps plus can tick a box to say they want to see file (then we arrange a time for them to come in).

 

BUT does this allow free access? does this mean that parents should be able to just help themselves? In which case how do you ensure that they don't look at other children's files? Or does it just mean that we must allow them to look whenever they want to?

 

 

Currently in a permanent state of confusion..... :oxD:(

 

N

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Hi

In my setting parents can look at their childs file at anytime. All children have their own individual file but all files are kept together on shelf.Parents need to ask member of staff to get their childs file for them. Parent can either look at file in room or take file home for a few days.

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My personal feeling is that "free access" is open to interpretation and that your interpretation will be coloured by the conditions in your particular setting. So if there is no worry over parents accidentally or purposefully browsing through other children's files, then you might leave them for what could be called truly free access. Other settings might not have the space to do this or might be concerned about others looking at them so then parents may be required to ask first. I think so long as you can explain your answer and you continually remind parents they are available for them to look at, you shouldn't have any problems.

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  • 1 month later...

I want to introduce this in my setting. Have just introduced learning journals for each child (which they didn't have) and have started to populate them with lots of photos, all my observation notes etc. and they are being kept in an accessible place. We apparently have a target day coming up when the parents come and we talk about targets for each child (cos at 3 they REALLY need them :o ) and I thought I'd introduce the files then and explain they can look at it anytime. I know what my two Nursery Nurses are going to say though - any suggestions about what can I say to counteract/cut off the "I don't think its a good idea" or the ever present "We didn't used to do it that way"! I should mention that they don't appear to have had any training in the new EYFS and consequently with my limited knowledge I seem to know more about the 'hot potatoes' than they do, which is probably unsettling for them!

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From a parents point of view :)

My sons nursery has all the files on display as we walk in and we can just look at them when we want to, which i think is a good idea, I've never asked if it can be taken home though.

 

I would never dream of looking at another childs file but these are slightly round a corner, I suppose a lot of it is on trust with the parents and of course space.

 

 

LucyHobbit

I would ask your staff why they think it isn't a good idea if they bring that point up, as for " we didn't used to" they have to see that things change, it must be hard though if they are against change. We didn't used to use computers like we do now but look how wonderful they are :o

Edited by Jolou
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