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Sen In Baby Unit


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Hi all

 

I'm not new to the site as I have used it for years for ideas and information and think it's great but I am new to posting on here, so hi all. xD

Wondering if some of you could help me. I work in a baby unit (0-3) and currently am studying part time BA Hons Early Childhood Studies. Our first module is the child with special needs. For my seminar I have to research an 'area' of special needs. Now, special needs is not a big specialist area of mine and as such have not worked with children with identified 'special needs' although I know children 0-3 have additional needs. I would really like to look at the support offered to potential sen in a baby unit as my subject area but am struggling for information, what steps to take, who to contact etc. A lot of people have said to me it is hard to identify if a child has special educational needs around this age due to development but I don't feel this is true. We observe our children and obviously look at where each child is at in comparision to milestones. If children seem to be 'behind' in some areas we will plan activities/experiences to support and observe these areas - so would this be classed as support 'sen' in a baby unit? Whenever I read things they always seem to be geared towards 3-4 yrs plus and not alot around the 0-3's. Any help would be much appreciated!!

 

Thank you all x

 

CLARE :o

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Hi Clare,

 

And thanks for joining us on the posting front!

 

I agree that it is possible to suspect or even identify special needs in a Baby Room. We have worked extensively with a child who was with us from 6 weeks. Our observant Manager picked up quickly on small signs with the result that her significant needs have been addressed from an early stage and she is doing better than might have been anticipated.

 

I will have a chat tomorrow and get back to you regarding your concerns.

 

Sue

 

PS I have deleted your duplicate Topic, to avoid confusion.

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Hi Sue

 

many thanks for your response (and thanks for deleting other post - don't know what happened there!) :o

That would be great if you could get back to me, what steps were taken with the child from 6 wks. I haven't had any experience as yet dealing with this.

 

CLARE X

Edited by hallfieldfirst
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No problem Clare :o

 

It's actually an important point you're making - that SEN can be detected this early and deserves to be given a higher profile in this age range.

 

Hoping I can get the chance to gather info at work and that your seminar goes well. When is it? Do please let us know how it goes.

 

Sue

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Hi Clare, not sure if I can help.

I worked in a baby room last year for 9 months.

I was there through funding from ISEY, (something like individual support...I can find out the correct title if you need)

My role was to take on the role of a staff member so freeing up that member to work closely with the child with SEN.

The disability had been identified at birth, a very complex and rare syndrome.

The child was under regular hospital visits, and had physio, these activities were passed onto the staff to do with the the child during the day.

The area SENCO was involved just to check on how everyone was doing. Apart from that there was no other help, it took weeks to get her a chair to help her sit upright and securely supported at meal times.

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Hi Rea and Sue

 

Thanks both for the info. Sue the seminar is towards the end of November so have a bit of time yet to research, although there isn't much - everything seems to focus on 3 yrs upwards!! Yes we are an area that needs thrusting a bit more into the spot light.

Rea that would be great if you could find out the title. Will look into that myself aswell. At my nursery we are fortunate to employ 2 full time floating members of staff, so obviously if we need to provide a more one to one with a child for whatever reason we usually can, barring any staff sickness or holidays obviously! :o

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Hi, been chatting with Manager:

 

Her first concerns were shared with staff who then observed. Parents were then approached who brushed it off. Subsequently concerns increased so again raised with parents. This led to parents approaching Health Visitor and the alarms went off.

 

Thus I suggest you have a route as follows - Alert staff - observe

Refer to parents with Obs as evidence (repeat this if necessary)

Signpost parents to Health Visitor or Children's Centre.

Once this has happened things should proceed automatically

 

Rea has referred to ISEY; we have something called ISSG 'Inclusion Service Support Grant' which will fund us for a 1:1 worker for the child.

 

Hope that info is ok?

 

Sue

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