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Being A Deputy...


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...is a hard job! I feel like I get all the responsibility and whilst am involved in decisions am overidden by my boss on many occasions.

My question is this, we run a lunch club for 7 or 8 children and my boss has decided to leave a person who is in training for nvq3 but not qualified and a student in charge of the lunchclub. Her arguement is that we are only in an upstairs room if there is a problem and we have walky talkys between the rooms. I am not happy with this AT ALL and have made my feelings clear, only for my boss to pull me aside to say people are complaining that I am creating an atmosphere. but i voiced my concerns to her not others and there probably is an atmosphere as I cringe everytime I walk out of the room.

So what do I do? I don't want to get in any more trouble for creating an unpleasant atmosphere, Ive said how I feel about it but my boss has overidden me again and I don't know what to do.

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I am not sure if there are rules and regs for lunchtimes re qulifications..........

 

There should always be 2 persons.

 

I don't think students can be counted in ratios/ numbers

 

Also is the lunch time part of private nursery sessions.......... because then surely the same rules apply as to the rest of the day??

 

Sorry not at all helpful there x

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Scarlettangel - I think you were very helpful!

 

I really feel you have the right of this jodse80 - students and 'working towards' shouldn't really be left in charge. I have encountered this before and fought my case. Good luck - I ended up leaving because practice did not change. I was told it would not change because "who are you, a Deputy to tell me I'm wrong". HMM Glad we parted company! Hope your situation isn't that bad?

 

Do let us know what happens

 

Sue

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If you are concerned that your setting is not meeting the welfare requirements, or that the children in your care are not being safely supervised, but your boss continues to ignore your objections, you are in a very difficult position.

 

Is your boss the owner of the group? If not, then can you bring your concerns to his/her attention? It won't make you popular, but at least you will have done everything you can. Does your group have a whistle blowing policy/procedure? That would offer you some protection if you decide to take this issue further.

 

However it sounds to me like this is not an isolated incident, and I wonder if the setting is big enough for the two of you? Maybe it is time to move on. That won't help your current setting very much I know, but at least you'll be working in an environment where your opinion is seen of worthy of consideration, and your expertise valued. It is so draining to have to work where you don't feel valued or appreciated.

 

Good luck - let us know what you decide to do.

 

Maz

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Just a quickie - students can be counted on the ratio as long as they are 'long term' and over 17 - see page 32 for further clarification.

 

Also the EYFS states;

'in group provision, food hygiene matters should be included in induction and on-the-job training, which is available to all staff involved in the preparation and handling of food'. p.27

 

good luck,

Spiral

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Thanks everyone, I appreciate all of your opinions. It isn't the first time it has happened and maybe I do need to start loking elsewhere because it is draining. There is a guy who owns it that I can go to but I know my boss would go ballistic if I went above her to him because they don't get on very well and in her words "he is looking for a reason to fire me" so my name would be mud with her and to be honest I'm not sure he would do anything about it as he likes the name of being the owner but none of the responsibility. Generally we get on ok it is just these few work things that we completely disagree on. I think I'm going to bring it up at our staff meeting and gage peoples opinions from that to try and resolve it and then if that doesn't work, it may be time to hit the job centre! Thanks though, it's so nice to hear that I am campaigning for the right thing for once! :o

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I agree that going above your bosses head should be a last resort. Maybe it is time that you looked for somewhere you would feel valued but.... for now, can you talk to your boss again, and say something along the lines of.... you know that staffing is tight and that the people she has left are capable, however, if Ofsted walked in and saw this then it wouldnt be acceptable, and you are just trying to protect the setting?

Getting people to see they need to raise their standards is hard, believe me, but sometimes its worth stepping back and playing the Ofsted card more subtly, and maybe she wont feel like shes being told shes wrong.

 

Good luck, i hope whatever you do works, you obviously have the childrens and settings welfare at heart its a shame you have a stubborn boss :o

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I must admit i read your post and thought if it was me i would not let it worry me, if your boss knows your views and still does it surely its up to her as she is your boss, and if it turns out shes doing something wrong then it falls down to her and will take the blame, if your only up stairs and have walkie talkies its not that bad? i have loads to do as a deputy and not to watch a lunch club would be good time to get the more important stuff done, but then i may be miss reading this. :o

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