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Lesson For An Interview


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I have had a few interviews lately and been unsuccessful - although I have received feedback from the HTs involved, they have been positive about the lessons and interview (feel they may be being kind) but the job has gone to someone with a particular skill they are looking for I did not seem to have! However, I have never done a lesson at interview that I feel is spectacular - I feel they end up being very run of the mill and I get so nervous I often forget what I meant to do!

I know this is a rather wide question .... but do any members have ideas for brilliant lessons to be done at interview or during an observation - any topic/theme as my experience is that Heads usually leave it up to the candidate to choose what they want to do ....? Getting a bit despondent! :o

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Hi scotsman,

 

So sorry that you haven't had much luck up to now but keep on trying - you will get there eventually!

 

Periodically we get people asking for interview advice and some members contribute with suggestions. If you search 'interview' in search forum posts you should find them. This may then give you a few ideas as a starting point until someone with more experience than me comes along to give you something more concrete! :o

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Hi there Scotsman. I have often been on the other side of that fence, interviewing candidates for jobs and from my perspective it isn't always the all singing all dancing activities that win the day. The sorts of things we are usually looking for will include:

 

Something that will catch attention of the children.

How you interact with them, adjusting your input to respond to them.

An activity plan outlining what you hope to achieve and what you will do

Be organized so that you have the resources you need or have asked for them in advance.

Have a clear voice (you'd be surprised how many interviews Ive observed where I couldn't hear the candidate)

Keep it simple. Especially if you get nerves.

Keep within the time allowed so consider this.

Consider any transition eg from carpet to group or inside to outside.. this takes time with a group you don't know.

 

I think if your feedback has to date been positive then you're probably doing the right things anyway. Sometimes schools just have a particular skill they would like to see and one day you be the one with it. If there is a next time when you dont get the post can you ask for more detailed feedback on exactly what it was that you didn't have?

 

Good luck with the next one.

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scotsman so sorry to read that you are not getting the posts but as Beau has said it will come.

 

What does the feedback say apart from 'on the day there was someone just better' which is the common response. Can you see a pattern in the feedback?

 

So all of that aside what aspect of teaching in reception do you like the most? Remembering you are teaching a group of children you do not know perhaps a get to know you kind of activitiy. So if you are given a small group it could be that you incorporate physical activity with getting to know you so you are in a circel with a small group of children and a bean bag. After saying your name you throw the bean bag to the feet of a child and ask them their name. They throw it back to you saying who you are and so on until you know all of their names. You could then go on to do an activity that fits in with your own specialism.

 

I think one of the saddest things is that most people stick to literacy or numeracy. But I saw a lovely session on dvd with magnets. The teacher had introduced magnets to all of the children then each child had a magent and a basket of object just to play with. As they discovered what was attracted to the magnet she would repeat this observation and if necessary use the correct terminology. some children began to sort their items so she made a chart for them to place the items in those that were attracted ( the children called it stuck to ) and those that were not. Lots of speaking and listening and sharing and so good to see something other that the usual.

 

keep at it there is a job for everyone out there.

 

Good Luck

 

Emilia

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scotsman so sorry to read that you are not getting the posts but as Beau has said it will come.

 

What does the feedback say apart from 'on the day there was someone just better' which is the common response. Can you see a pattern in the feedback?

 

So all of that aside what aspect of teaching in reception do you like the most? Remembering you are teaching a group of children you do not know perhaps a get to know you kind of activitiy. So if you are given a small group it could be that you incorporate physical activity with getting to know you so you are in a circel with a small group of children and a bean bag. After saying your name you throw the bean bag to the feet of a child and ask them their name. They throw it back to you saying who you are and so on until you know all of their names. You could then go on to do an activity that fits in with your own specialism.

 

I think one of the saddest things is that most people stick to literacy or numeracy. But I saw a lovely session on dvd with magnets. The teacher had introduced magnets to all of the children then each child had a magent and a basket of object just to play with. As they discovered what was attracted to the magnet she would repeat this observation and if necessary use the correct terminology. some children began to sort their items so she made a chart for them to place the items in those that were attracted ( the children called it stuck to ) and those that were not. Lots of speaking and listening and sharing and so good to see something other that the usual.

 

keep at it there is a job for everyone out there.

 

Good Luck

 

Emilia

Thank you - that is a real help - a slightly different "get to know you" activity and a lovely sounding lesson. I think keep it simple but do something a little different like you magnet activity will make a big difference. Even if I am asked to do literacy or numeracy, linking it to a KUW activity would be much more interesting. Brill!!

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Hi there Scotsman. I have often been on the other side of that fence, interviewing candidates for jobs and from my perspective it isn't always the all singing all dancing activities that win the day. The sorts of things we are usually looking for will include:

 

Something that will catch attention of the children.

How you interact with them, adjusting your input to respond to them.

An activity plan outlining what you hope to achieve and what you will do

Be organized so that you have the resources you need or have asked for them in advance.

Have a clear voice (you'd be surprised how many interviews Ive observed where I couldn't hear the candidate)

Keep it simple. Especially if you get nerves.

Keep within the time allowed so consider this.

Consider any transition eg from carpet to group or inside to outside.. this takes time with a group you don't know.

 

I think if your feedback has to date been positive then you're probably doing the right things anyway. Sometimes schools just have a particular skill they would like to see and one day you be the one with it. If there is a next time when you dont get the post can you ask for more detailed feedback on exactly what it was that you didn't have?

 

Good luck with the next one.

 

Thank you so much for your advice - you are absolutely right - being heard is so important and I think if I keep it simple, but a bit different, that will help. Your check list is a real help and will focus my thoughts next time......

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