Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Homework In Early Years


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have been an Early Years Teacher for 13 years. I have EYPS. My son started a Reception Class (not where I work) in September and I was really happy with the school, but a couple of things have been niggling me. They have a lovely conservatory built outside each classroom, set up with builders trays, easels etc.. (3 Reception Classes) but my son tells me they are never allowed to play there. Secondly, he is give phonic homework 3 times a week and today scrawled across it in blue pen was the words 'very disappointing work, colour neatly please'. I'm completely gobsmacked. Am I right to be upset, or is it me who's missing the point here. Surely the fact that he is getting homework is a topic for debate in itself, but is not positive encouragement the way to go rather than defacing it with negative comments. I can't quite get over it...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This does not sound right to me, I hope you get this sorted out soon other wise you son mithgt go off the whole idea of learning

 

 

Thanks.

 

I've already emailed the school this evening, pretty much saying just that. I am literally astonished.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A change of schools sounds good to me - had my son in wrong school for far too long. You will find it very hard to get them to change their ways. Make the move whilst he is still young - I regretted not moving mine, it gets harder as they get older.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks.

 

I've already emailed the school this evening, pretty much saying just that. I am literally astonished.

 

I can't believe your son gets homework in Reception that sounds like it is being marked as if it was Junior Work! You are right to question this. All those lovely games that could be played, fun/ nonsense rhymes, just enjoying the rhythm and metre of simple poetry etc.etc. Surely that would be a better way tohelp your son improve his phonics? Have you asked any other parents what they think? Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't believe your son gets homework in Reception that sounds like it is being marked as if it was Junior Work! You are right to question this. All those lovely games that could be played, fun/ nonsense rhymes, just enjoying the rhythm and metre of simple poetry etc.etc. Surely that would be a better way tohelp your son improve his phonics? Have you asked any other parents what they think? Good luck.

 

 

Trouble is because I teach a Reception Class myself, I never get to see the other parents. My husband does the dropping off. I was truly stunned when I read it. What makes it harder is that my son seems to actually really love going to school, so it can't be all bad. Well I've sent the email to the school now this evening, so I'll let you all know what they have to say for themselves.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What sort of phonic homework does he get, our children have a sound book they take home every day with a picture of their new sound in.

The children just look at todays sound and tell their parents what sound they have learnt today.

If someone had wrote very dissapointing in my childs reception book I would be making an appointment to see the head :o .

It is very sad xD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a jolly phonic writing sheet. One is sent three times a week. The one scrawled over was the 'd' sheet where they have to colour in a duck, a door a dinosaur and some dice and then write about 10 'd' formations at the bottom. He chose lots of different colours and of course has no way of staying within the lines and coloured it (i think beautifully for a 4 year old) and duly wrote his 'd' formations at the bottom. I thought it was lovely...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He should just be encouraged in his mark making and being given confidence at the moment - think 'teacher' needs early years training!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi - maybe you need to talk to the school about whether their staff have ever studied child development ............................ :o

 

they are doing a good job of turning boys off to education - have they read the Rose Report ?

 

Sorry, this has made me feel real MAD especially for your little boy - I would find a new school if I was you - interested to know your reply Dot xD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Colouring isn't phonics.

 

We use Jolly Phonics and send the mnemonic home to practise along with letter formation but all I ever ask is for the children to have a go. The letters at the bottom of the sheet are far too small for most reception children especially the boys, unless the sheet has been altered.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How AWFUL!!!!!!!

 

You are absolutely right to raise this with the school. I hope they respond promptly & fairly.

 

We, too, moved our daughter after a term and a half because of a very negative situation in Yr 1.

 

The teacher there had a fondness for "it's not good enough" and she was right - SHE wasn't good enough and we moved to a new school. :o It was the best decision we ever made!

 

Less than 6 months later that particular teacher was singled out by Ofsted for "failing the brighter children and girls in particular" and the school placed in special measures!!

 

Have faith in your "gut feeling" and fight for what you KNOW is right!

 

Nona

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I, as others do, have an issue with 'homework' at such a young age, and like you I would have been 'gobsmacked' if my daughter came home with her 'efforts' defaced. :o

 

How has your son reacted to this 'marking' of his work? Obviously as he can't read yet (well not to the level of the message) the comment was, to me, a very poor communication intended for your benefit to take up with your son. I certainly wouldn't see this as positive partnership with parents. Does the teacher not think he/she can talk to your husband, if he/she feels your sons work is not up to par?

 

I had issues with my daughters reception teacher last year for the total dependence on 'worksheets' for homework. Also my son (aged 10 but SEN) gets lots of 'worksheet' presented homework. I discussed my concerns with the headteacher. The school was going through major staff changes and I was assured that come September, new term, new teachers, the homework policy would be reviewed and changed.

 

Both my daughter (Y1 now) and son still have worksheets every week, this is bad enough but the content is often beyond their abilities. My daughter was given Key stage 3 literacy a few weeks ago :( (discussed this on the forum). My son needs 'practical' activities to promote understanding, and more importantly 'enjoyment' of any homework he does. xD

 

I haven't as yet spoke to the new teachers, I am giving them a chance to settle into their new school and the new term. :(

However, what I do do is write all over the worksheets, an objective, clear 'observation' of how my daughter / son has 'managed' the task. Also for my son I adapt the task into practical activites, ie: last weeks maths was about the various ways to place 4 small rectangles into a larger rectangle shape. We did this using lego, he was meant to draw his results but we used photo's instead. :wacko: This is extra 'work' for me, but it helps make the task;

1/ enjoyable

2/ successful (pic uploaded :( )

 

I have also written on my daughters worksheets that the level is too advanced when I think it's needed, with clear justification why I think it is. xD

 

I don't think changing schools will help,(son only just settled, plus would the grass be any greener?) I do think you've done the right thing by contacting the school immediately and if I were you I'd follow this up asap with a face to face meeting, with yourself or husband and teacher.

 

My daughters initial comment on moving to Y1 was "We don't play anymore", I mentioed this when the school had a parent open evening, and was reassured this was not the case. ( what I saw, and what the teacher told me).

 

I hope you can get this sorted, if this unsuitable practice doesn't change then I would just write to the school and say that I was deferring any homework until more suitable methods are used and a more 'positive' attitude to effort was forthcoming from the teacher.

 

I'll be interested to hear what response you get from your email.

 

Peggy

post-3604-1223417810_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whilst I am astonished re the "homework" and the comment on it, why oh why is your son not allowed to use the conservatory area?

 

It is so early in the reception year that it shouldn't be so different from nursery and free / outdoor play should be top of the list!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

What heaven to ahve a conservatory area and what bad planning not to use it!!!!!!!!!!

 

I too wait to hear what the school say!

 

Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

xD:o:(

 

I am shocked, as I mentioned before on here my children's school have adopted 'no homework in this school' attitude - it is really insightful how many children are beginning to enjoy reading with parents at home and doing what children do....play (little do they realise what wonderful learning is going on that is better that worksheets!) :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would also speak to the school but I would find areally pertinent quote or section from the EYfs document or some other research paper that supports your argument about good practice and go armed with a weapon!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gosh, it really doesn't seem on the face of it to be very good does it! Obviously you need to clarify the situation regarding how your child spends his day - how much 'playing' is involved and how much free choice do they get in terms of resources and activities played with. Children can sometimes be very selective about the bits of the day they relate - often focusing on the negative aspects and completely overlooking all the super things!

 

Also, who wrote the comments on the worksheet and why exactly - it may have been a TA or someone and the teacher themselves may turn out to be horrified. While you're at it you can then challenge the necessity for pointless homework in any case. :o That will keep you busy for a while. xD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How horrible, horrible, horrible. Definitely go in and have a chat armed with secret weapons of quotes from EYFS to produce if necessary - hopefully Beau will be right. If after chatting you still feel uncomfortable with the school, maybe you will decide that changing shools is for the best. Only you can make that decision, weighing up everything you know about your son, the school and other local schools. Good luck with it all - let us know what happens!

 

P.S. My daughter starts in reception next year, and this is my secret nightmare - and not being fully aware of the whole situation as I'm teaching my own reception class. I've already got my husband taking Rosa into nursery with the job of finding out what's in the sand, wht's the role play, what kind of phase 1 letters and sounds are they doing - poor man- next year I'll be even worse!

 

X

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Wolfie

Nothing new to add to what others have written but just wanted to give you my support - I'll keep checking the board tonight to find out what the school said! :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well everyone, I'm still gobsmacked. I emailed the school today and the teacher rang me at 3.30pm. She was incredibly defensive off her practice and told me that she had been teaching Early Years for 15 years (as have I, I promptly responded). We argued and I made the point that NEVER in a million years would I dare deflate a child's confidence in this way. I also made the point that worksheets of this nature can stifle the growth of a child's mark making and creative writing - but oh no, she was not having any of it. She said they needed strict guidance on staying within the lines or else they will never learn!!

 

I've made an appointment to see the Head!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gosh, it really doesn't seem on the face of it to be very good does it! Obviously you need to clarify the situation regarding how your child spends his day - how much 'playing' is involved and how much free choice do they get in terms of resources and activities played with. Children can sometimes be very selective about the bits of the day they relate - often focusing on the negative aspects and completely overlooking all the super things!

 

Also, who wrote the comments on the worksheet and why exactly - it may have been a TA or someone and the teacher themselves may turn out to be horrified. While you're at it you can then challenge the necessity for pointless homework in any case. :o That will keep you busy for a while. xD

 

I did hope that was the case. I thought it must be a student or a TA, but oh no it was the most experienced Teacher herself!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi - so very sad to think a teacher in this day and age is of this opinion. The thing is you are educated in early years and you know that what she is teaching is wrong - what about the other 30 odd children in the class - if their parents are not aware that what she is teaching is wrong , and they are re-acting in a negative way to their child - what a very poor education these children are receviing. :o hope you have a better conversation with the head tomorrow. Dot

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OH dear :o

 

Good luck with your meeting with the head teacher, ask her for the schools homework policy then 'rip it to pieces' using the EYFS principles.

Ask her what the consequence is to your you or your son if you decide, as his parent, to not support the 'doing' of such homework.

And if you feel strongly consider a complaint to Ofsted.

 

Peggy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, I had SO hoped it was not the teacher!

 

Having been there, done that, I know exactly how you are feeling.

 

I can't help thinking that whatever the Head's personal views they'll have to be seen to support the teacher. Perhaps, as Peggy suggested, a chat with Ofsted is the way forward?

 

Let us know how your appointment with the Head goes - we're backing you all the way!

 

Nona

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)