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Early Intervention


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Hi guys,

 

I was wondering if anyone has any links about why early recognition of developmental delay is essential.

 

I realise this is a really busy time for you all, any help would be apprieciated.

 

Thanks in advance

 

Sal

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You might also google Early Support - they have lots of materials you can download and might have some useful information about global development delay, or something similar. Given their focus of 'early support' there may be some helpul information about why early intervention is so important.

 

Perhaps if you find anything really good you could post it on here for us to see?

 

Good luck in your searches!

 

Maz

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I googled "Early Intervention Special needs" and this was one of the first links, a quick scan read and it looks like it may be useful, lots of other links but haven't looked at them.

 

Good luck with your studies, if that is what the info is for. :o

 

EARLY INTERVENTION

 

Peggy

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I'd just like to add through my experience as a Foster carer, early Intervention is crucial, my foster son is now aged 10 yrs, he has just got his Statutory Assessment (last week) He will now receive 25 hrs L Support at his school, and we are currently seeking out a special school for him. He has been defined by the assessment as having Profound, Severe, Complex Needs (PSCN). He doesn't 'display' as PSCN (not sure really how it should look :o ), but his cognitive development is at approximately age 6/7 yrs, however, he doesn't 'learn' in the same ways as a 6/7 yr old does. Although he has progressed in terms of some concepts ie: he can read (OTLevel 4), His GDD is increasing, the 'gap' is widening. His current mainstream school have been fantastic but the complexity of his global development delay will require specialist teaching if he is to progress at a 'consistent' level. I just wish, for him, he hadn't had to wait so long into his educational life to get this support.

 

Because he doesn't appear 'severe', his behaviour is 'complient' and due to 'other' life history, he has been 'missed',therefore he has not had the specialist input in the past that his needs require.

 

On a slightly different note, I have travelled a big 'learning curve' over the last year since he came to live with us. The StatutoryAssessment process has been a very positive experience (unlike I was led to believe it would be) in terms of the process being quick and efficient since I first requested the assessment. I knew (in my unspecialist mind) that his needs would most probably require special school intervention, but to read it in print is difficult. I can only part imagine what it must be like for 'real' parents to have to go through the process of having their child 'defined' as PSCN (or any other special needs label). It's hard to describe what emotions I've gone through since Friday (getting the Stat Assessment). He is very happy at his current school (because he attends an out of year class), their 'inclusive practice' is excellent. However, they can't meet his needs as he approaches secondary school age, so it's sad that he will have to move from there but on the other hand he will get specialist support in the future.

 

It's early days yet, finding a special school etc. Sorry to have gone 'off topic' but the subject is currently very close to my heart.

 

Peggy

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