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Wondered if anyone could advise me, we have a child who's parent will not allow sun cream, says she doesnt want child to look like a milk bottle (her words not mine).

Any way my reaction is no sun then, however she says we must take him out to play and she will provide a cotton long sleeve top and a sun hat.

Im not comfortable with this, has any one come across this before and what did you do about it, need to write it into our sun protection policy.

not really sure what to do.

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Whilst we ask parents to apply sun cream on hot days we do not have a policy as regards no cream no outside.

 

When we have had the VERY occasional mega hot day we haven't let children outdoors who have had no hat no sun cream and skimpy clothing.

 

We would be very remiss I think sending them out like that...... to get burnt!

 

We REALLY push them wearing a hat on these days.

 

I would say it is a form of abuse using the reasons you stated (from parent) about not using cream......, however with cotton long sleeved top and hat she is at least covering up her child..................

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it is a tricky one and if it were me would ensure the policy was updated .. but she is covering up her child so as long as i could ensure we had shade outside would let the chid go out - especially the way our summers are going!!!! :o

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I was going to have parent sign to say this is what she has requested and that child can only go out in top and hat also to ensure she understands nursery policy with regard to sun safety. Also to sign to say she has declined sun cream for her child against the advice of the nursery.

Is that ok to do x

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I was going to have parent sign to say this is what she has requested and that child can only go out in top and hat also to ensure she understands nursery policy with regard to sun safety. Also to sign to say she has declined sun cream for her child against the advice of the nursery.

Is that ok to do x

 

 

I think there is a balance here, but ultimately the welfare of the child is paramount, IF you feel that going outside (even with long sleeve top and hat) is detrimental to the child's health (really depends on risk assessment AT THE TIME) then I don't think you can abdicate responsibility for the child because the parent has signed a form.

Maybe introduce the parent to the 'blue' coloured sun block, do a google search there is lots of evidence to show the parent of the damage caused to delicate (ie: young skin) through even low strength sun rays. Then also show her your child protection and health policies.

Maybe have a meeting after she has been given this information to see if she will reconsider her demands. If her stance is the same then if I were you I'd contact Ofsted and give them the details of the situation and ask them to write you a letter stating clearly their requirements in this matter, or a letter stating clearly if they think the parents parental rights overule your guidance, tell them you want this so that you are covered come inspection or worse still litigation from the child if he/she incurs health problems in the future which he/she deems is your responsibility.

 

This all seems a bit 'dramatic' but at the end of the day, we have to abide by these regulations so the regulators should give you back up in following them.

 

Hope that helps. it does seem OTT, but you are inspected under the ECM staying safe & being healthy.

The attached principles from H&S however, helps to keep things in perspective.

 

Peggy

principles_of_risk_assessment_HSE.pdf

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We recently had a similar incident although the parent claimed it was on advice from the GP that the child wasn't to wear lotion. Initially we asked for a doctor's letter but then mum said the Gp hadn't said this but that she could not find one their skin did not react to. We suggested she spoke to the Gp again for advice and he might be able to prescribe something or recommend. This was answered by her bringing in a letter basically saying what your parent is and stating she would not hold us responsible if the child got burnt. All good we thought.

 

Something was nagging at me and I mentioned it to our development worker from the LA. She stated it was not the answer at all and that we could be investigated by Ofsted if the child did get burnt.For example she pointed out that if the child suffered sunburn and the parent asked advice from the GP, the GP might report us to Ofsted for failing to protect the child.

 

We now include the requirement for parents to use sun protection cream in our policies and ask parents to sign to state they agree with and will uphold the policies. We also have the parents sign daily to state they have applied sun cream. Of course the parent in question could at this point lie and we could do no more but that was the best advice we were given by LA.

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Just as an aside, on recent first aid training we were told that children with significant sunburn should not be allowed to attend until they've seen a doctor. It's as much a true burn as any other. I was sort of aware of that already but it reinforced it!

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