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WE ARE MOVING TO A TOPIC BASED APPROACH IN SCHOOL THIS YEAR, MORE IN LINE WITH FOUNDATION STAGE, OTHER CLASSES HAVE USED FILM TO SUPPORT LITERACY BUT I HAVE BEEN SLOW TO GET ON BOARD, ONLY BECAUSE OF 1000 OTHER THINGS TO DO. I WAS WONDERING IF ANYONE HAD USED FILM TO SUPPORT AREAD OF LEARNING IN THE FOUNDATION STAGE ADN IF SO ANY PARTICULAR ONES THAT WORK WELL

THANKS

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Sorry I'm a bit confused I thought topic based planning was going out due to the EYFS focus on childrens individual learning styles and interest based planning. :o

 

The only films I've used with preschool were popular stories such as The Hungry Caterpiller, a very funny video called 'Spider' and the Festivals one. (sorry can't think of the supplier.)

 

Peggy

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Have a look at the network twilights that Lancashire have run, too - Focus on Film, Visual Literacy and Box of Delights - powerpoints, participants packs and references to films included. The reference to Tom Sweep is a cracker - I've a unit of work planned on that somewhere - I'll look it up and can send it over if you pm me. It's a good one to get started with.

http://www.lancsngfl.ac.uk/nationalstrateg...category_id=328

http://www.lancsngfl.ac.uk/nationalstrateg...category_id=327

http://www.lancsngfl.ac.uk/nationalstrateg...category_id=325

Tracy :o

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Well Peggy i am sure the EYFS sounds good but in reality things are very differnt. I think children can think of things that interset them and there will always be something film based to support it. I find topics a great starting point so long as you don't prescribe what you do each week e.g. week 1 smell, week 2 taste. What do others think?

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Sorry peggy just read this post and think it might sound a bit stern, i just want to say it was not meant that way, sorry x

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No worries, no offence taken. :o

 

There have been many discussions before about whether to do topics, or not and I personally think that there is sometimes a place for them to introduce ideas / information that is not readily within the childrens everyday context, festivals being an example, or at the beginning of a new year the topic of ourselves linked to the children settling in.

However I personally feel that when planning is not inspired by the childrens interests and based on a topic 'title' then it is much harder work and often (not always) uninspiring, for staff as well as children. Often members on the forum have requested activity ideas for specific topic 'titles' because they find it difficult to think of any, or find it difficult to make the topic relevant to the children. This, I feel, can make the 'planning' quite narrow, fitting the topic to the areas of learning as well, rather than planning to the childrens current learning styles / interests.

I'm not saying I've never used topics, what I have done though is waited until the children indicate what topics they show an interest in following, ie: observations showing particular interest in pets, I would use ideas from a previous topic planning on Pets. Maybe my topic planning would be better described as a bank of activity ideas, covering cross curricular concepts, attitudes and skills that support childrens directed / initiated interests.

 

I've been looking at quotes lately and these sum up my ethos on this subject;

 

What we want is to see the child in pursuit of knowledge, and not knowledge in pursuit of the child.

-- George Bernard Shaw

 

 

Do not train children to learning by force and harshness, but direct them to it by what amuses their minds, so that you may be better able to discover with accuracy the peculiar bent of the genius of each.

-- Plato

(not that I think anyone uses force and harshness, to me the term 'train' is what I wouldn't want to be doing)

 

I've also heard the phrase; Take the learning to the child (ie: scaffold from where they are at) rather than the child to the learning. (expect them to follow your lead)

 

As I'm sure you'll agree the balance needs to be with the child at the centre, and to be aware that an over emphasis on topic based planning may cause the childrens learning experiences to be too compartmentalized within the topic subject, excluding other avenues of interest.

 

Please understand I am not trying to tell anyone 'how to suck eggs' or wish to appear to be patronizing of anyones EY knowledge, just voicing my thoughts on the subject. :(

 

So, not wishing to hijack your original query, I hope tracylu's response & links have been useful and others come along with more recommendations and you find some useful films to support the areas of learning, thus reducing some of your workload in researching for these films. xD

 

Peggy

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