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Jolly Phonics


Guest Really
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Guest Really

I am an NQT starting in Reception and through reading a lot of articles and by reading posts on here I want to teach JP.

 

I have managed to persuade the school to let me do it, which is the first step!!

 

However, some staff had made comments that it won't work because of the schools Lancashire accent! Any comments on that please.

 

Also, they do the individual letter sounds in the schools nursery, but it has never been carried on before, which is what I intend to do. Should I introduce them at the same pace as the handbook even though some children will have learnt the sounds already?

 

One more question - what resources can I make to help the children?

 

Any help, direction, advice would be more than welcome.

 

Thanks in advance!

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We do a combination of Jolly Phonics and Synthetic phonics. Most of the children come from pre-school settings were they have learnt some of the sounds. We introduce the sounds 3 a week from about the week before autumn half term.

We have all the letters printed separately on to cards about 3 inches square. One set we use as flash cards and one set with velcro on that go on the phonics board. We can then use the velcro cards for spelling, blending and reading. We start doing this from the second sound introduced.

The children also go and find the letter they need when writing.... which makes them more independent.

Next year I am planning on making individual sets of cards on a board for the children to use at the tables for spelling activities and to aid letter recognition.

 

Hope this is of some help

 

L :)

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I tend to do a combination fo jolly phonics and PIPs. I found that the jolly phonics worksheet is not very inspiring and don't use it. Instead, we 'write the letter sound using paint, brushes, sand and salt. We also use wipe boards as chidlren are able to wipe out their work if they want to. I also use hands on sorting objects acc to the sound activities and we use a mirror to 'see' our mouth and lips when sounding out the sounds. Quite useful when you want to get them pronoucing the sound- esp f and t and th. chidlren can see theri mouth and lip placment alongside the adult who is doing the same. Quite effective.

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We use JP's in the nursery and "Progression in phonics" (PIPs) onwards through R,Y1 and Y2 with some back up from JP's. Personally I think Pips is more exciting in the teaching of spelling and writing and in my school we would expect to see it as part of the word level work ultimately, but to consolidate the initial phonics and link with nursery the reception teachers do use JP's in the first instance. Of course the literacy strategy/PIPs is guidance and not statutory so your school policy on teaching literacy would guide you ultimately! There is more guidance on STEP 1 of PIPS coming from DfES which will exemplify more the activities for nursery age children.

 

Interestingly enough I was asked about my thoughts on jolly phonics in a recent interview!! That was more or less what I said. :o

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We have used JP for the last 6 years in the Reception class. we introduce 5 letters a week and have found it an effective way of helping children to remember the sound/symbol and the action is a good prompt. We then use PiPs activities to practise and consolidate the sounds. The Durham accent is no hindrance to learning the JP way so cant see that Lancastrians should have a problem!! we also have each letter in "block letter" type so that the children can practise the formation using rainbow writing.

Anne 2 :o

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I introduced a bit of Jolly phonics ythis year. We use Thrass and PIPs but we incorporated actions to accompany the phonemes and it worked a treat especially with the SEN children. It just adds a kinaesthetic approach to learning. :D:o

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HI my advice would be to check out what the children know, and then to go for JP in its entirety, Do not modify the letters introduced. IF the children already have good phonic knowledge re individual sounds they will cope with 6 a week as programme. Otherwise you might need to slow it down a little but not to less than 4 a week.

 

PiPs is alot slower than JP but some of the games can be adapted if you need to follow this. I would recommend as I have done both though that you stick to JP.

 

For resources you need the handbook and I think the frieze is useful. Otherwise we made the resources in the book. I have never used the colouring sheets though.

Bookshops sell the handbook and some of the pupil resources- no P&P if you buy from them! Jolly Phonics website (www.jollylearning.co.uk) is a source of other bits as are most of the education catalogs.

 

As for the accent thats just a cop out. :o

 

Good luck.

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