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Hands On?


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I'm thinking of applying for a teachers post that is 0.5 teaching and o.5 outreach. My query is about the role of the teacher in CC. Are you there to 'lead' and plan or do you also get hands on teaching?

Secondly have any of you crossed from Reception teaching in a primary school to CC that is not attached to a school and therefore has the younger FS chn and how did you find the change?

Hope this makes sense!

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Guest Wolfie

Hi rendellers! I think you'll find that every Children's Centre sees the role of their teacher differently and that some are far more hands on than others - the role might very well be what you make it to some extent, so if you are keen to keep a strong hands on approach you should be able to.

 

Is the position a new one or are you replacing someone? If it's new, you'll be in a very strong position to set precedents - and evn if it's not, everyone works differently and contributes their skills and experience in a different way. I've just contributed to another thread under "Children's Centres" - Gwen is applying for a job too - and have put links to a couple of articles that you might find useful to read:

 

http://www.foundation-stage.info/forums/in...mp;#entry127309

 

Regarding the switch from school to Centre, I came from having run my own nursery for five years so the switch wasn't the same and I did have experience of working with children aged 2 and upwards. However, babies were new to me and I have worked hard to develop my skills and experience with that age group. Part of that development has been undertaking EYPS and I would strongly suggest that you have a look at what that entails - many teachers in CC are now being asked to undertake that training and assessment and it is a very good way of developing your practice.

 

http://www.cwdcouncil.org.uk/projects/earlyyears.htm

 

The change from school to Centre is a very big one and I do know that it hasn't suited everyone. You will be working as part of a large multi-disciplinary team and need to be very flexible about your role and responsibilities and ways of working. Although you may be able to retain a good chunk of "hands on" there will be many other projects and roles to get your teeth into and time management will be very important. I absolutely love the job but it just depends how much the hands on bit of your job means to you - it certainly won't be a teaching job in the sense of your current job.

 

Any more questions, give us a shout! :o

 

Oh..I've just had another look at your question - it says 0.5 teaching which suggests that at least half of your job will be hands on??

Edited by Wolfie
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Hi Rendellers, Ill echo much of what Woflie has said. Different LAs perceive the role in different ways and its a good idea to do your homework.. Visit other CCs in your LA if you can, visit the place the CC you are applying to and ask the questions about the role..if its new though they may not know!! In some ways being new in role mean that you can create the role, but it depends on what the manager views the role to be.

I do very little teaching, although I do try to do some, but I only work two days, one in the CC one in outreach and both demand so much of my time that I could fill them both twice over. You will need to find out what they mean by outreach too, I do an awful lot of support to families in their homes along with the family support worker and very little support of provision in the area, (but then there is dire shortage of provision in our reach area, another role I need to adopt soon!).

 

I came out of school and it is a risk, I was very lucky to have started with a secondment which meant I could test the waters without giving up a permanent job. Im glad I did, I needed a change from school and yes it is very very different. It is also more isolating and establishing a network is really important unless you are the sort of person who thrives on working on their own.

In some ways Id rather be in a CC not attached to a school, as I think you have more independence.

 

Whatever you decide, good luck with it, but do be sure you want a big change in your working life before going for it.

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Guest Wolfie

Having read Mundia's reply, it reinforces what I said about every position being different - I haven't done ANY support of families in their homes yet...but would love to! :o

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Thanks for all the advise. I've got a lot of research to do! I had already thought of visiting CC as its always useful to see other settings. The advert says teacher wanted ASAP and as I am not able to start until September I'm not hopeful anyway- my next step I think will be an informal phone call.

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It varies Wolfie. Sometimes its making an initial visit with the family worker to assess need and what we can do to support. Sometimes its identifying parents who might benefit from some sort of training (eg weaning, behaviour support. talking to children, literacy etc etc). Sometimes its organising for a playworker to go in and play with the children or support mum with playing with children or making the home safer. Its at times part social worker; part family support; part counsellor; part health visitor; part a whole lot of other things too. Sometimes its simply taking our services to hard to reach and isolated families because otherwise they wouldn't access them.

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Guest Wolfie

Very similar to the kinds of home visits and support offered that we do then, it's just that I'm not involved with those at our centre - we have Family Support and Early Years Outreach workers who do that.....but I might try and become a little more involved now that I know you are! It's something that I would really like to do.

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