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Eyfs - In A Nut Shell


Rea
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Firstly, as part of my tutoring foray I have 10 minutes to do an icebreaker which is merely finding out where everyone works and have to give an overview of the EYFS.

Now, in essence its simple but I've only got a few minutes, so how would you describe the EYFS?

 

Secondly, do you know whee I can find worksheets in languages other than English? :o

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That will certainly do to get me started LJW, I can take out the most specific bits, thanks :o

 

Wolfie, I'd like a regular worksheet but with all the instructions etc in French, Spanish, German. Those countries probably dont have them, but I have to do a bit about the horrors of worksheets and thought it might make an impact if they couldnt read them. Just like your regular 3 or 4 year old! xD

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Parent, friend or neighbour??? :o

No, no and no. :( Good idea though xD

Actually I occassionally use a translastion site so I could give that a go. Thanks :(

Another idea is to have names typed up in Japanese and then ask them to trace over them, again, just like your average 3 or 4 year old, where do you start with your pencil? :(

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Liking your thought process Rea.

Actually I visited some early years settings in France a few years ago with my BTEC students and one class we visited was like something out of the victorian era :o , rows of desks (with old fashioned ink wells), blackboard (haven't seen one of them for a while) and very, very, formal, so if you know anyone in France they may actually be able to get you a genuine french worksheet. :(

 

I think using Chinese or Japanese text is your best idea, for 'writing' and general worksheets, basically because French/German etc although they may not understand any words, they could 'phonetically' read them, whereas Chinese is totally unreadable ( for me anyway!!) or even arabic or similar text to prove your point.

 

Be careful though, you may get someone who thinks using your 'foriegn' worksheets would be a great idea to include in their setting as a 'multicultural' resource. :(:( :wacko: (DOH, back to square one)

 

I think Marion had a good quote about curriculum, not sure if it was EYFS though, even if she hasn't I'm sure she would find you one very quickly in her website database, maybe give her a PM. xD

 

ooh, your delivery methods sound really fun and exciting, ( yet profound) can't wait to hear more of your ideas as your course progresses. xD

 

Peggy

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"ooh, your delivery methods sound really fun and exciting, ( yet profound) can't wait to hear more of your ideas as your course progresses."

 

Yeah well, the nerves will see to that :o

 

I see your point about French/German words compared to Japanese/Chinese. You watch, I'll have a student who is fluent in every eastern language!! :(

 

I've found an excellent worksheet to totally rip apart, both physically and vocally. :(

take a look here...social xD:(

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If the intention is to prove that worksheets don't work because children can't read them..why dont you invent a language using symbols or back to front letters etc. That way there is no risk that anyone will actually be able to "translate" them or read them and you can demonstrate the same idea.....meaningless double dutch has no place in learning.

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