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Cursive Writing And Dyspraxia Ideas To Argue For Print.


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We did an earlier post on cursive handwriting. My son's school has a policy of cursive writing from reception. He finds it hard to do as we has problems with his gross and fine motor skills. He has been having OT and we have been working at home with him on "handwriting without tears". His handwriting has improved and he has enjoyed printing. We spoke to his headmistress and asked if she could support this and even got a letter from the OT on the matter. She said that the school policy is for cursive and that they would do "write from the start" with him at school and move onto cursive. They could not support his printing. I think that Aaron has been given some coaching to do cursive formation of "a" at school and now he is completely confused and lost all motivation for his work. His handwriting has decreased exponentially. Is there any way using government guidelines, we can persuade the headteacher to support us on cursive?

 

Thanks

 

Nadri

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Well apart from

every child matters - meeting childs individual needs

childrens rights act

ask there polcy on inclusion and diversity point out it doesnt just mean multi cultural or children with sen

new eyfs a statutary framework to implement in sept - big emphasis on individual child

im sure someone will come along with more and the right way to put your case

good luck and stick with it

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Some dyspraxia kids do better with cursive, but some lack the visual perception skills necessary to do cursive. My son finds it hard to do lots of curves whereas with print he can limit the pen strokes needed for each letter.

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found these sites

 

making inclusion work for children with dyspraxia - chapter 7

 

Found this criteria for handwriting SATS level 2, one criteria being ' confident personal style', however all examples are joined up writing.

 

SATS requirements handwriting

 

This paper states that children with dyspraxia prefer cursive writing, it also explains the motor problems they suffer with and strategies to help although it is aimed at older children.

 

HERE

 

 

a very good description of dyspraxia and learning issues. Here is a small quote relevant to your query but only a small part of a document I personally have found very useful to read because of my own Foster sons difficulties.

 

quote

In respect of motor skills, the moral is to encourage the child to "compete against himself" rather than against some ideal or average target, i.e. whether the task concerns quantity of writing, accuracy of throwing, etc., the child seeks to improve performance gradually, whatever the level of skills shown by peers.

 

 

With younger children, the type of clothes worn may minimise the difficulties and length of time associated with changing for P.E./games/swimming, e.g. using Velcro instead of buckles or buttons; choosing clothes with an obvious back and front; using enlarged buttons and button holes; etc.

 

 

In respect of writing, one might experiment in finding what is most comfortable for the child. For example, if there is difficulty with printing and if letters are poorly formed and spaced, then simple, cursive writing could be taught. Subsequently, it may be appropriate to reduce stress linked to writing by helping the child to use a simple and portable word processor.

 

It's called Dyspraxia general informaton and guidelines, the paragraphs re: school age are quite a way down the web page.

HERE

 

 

This document states children may prefer print to cursive writing

HERE

 

It does seem that there is a conflicting argument for and against cursive writing, however, I'm with Andreamay on this one in that this is about an individual child, your son wo is currently showing emotional stress / anxiety when writing, maybe taking the focus off writing all together for a while until all who are working with him can agree what is best for him. I think it is time to put aside general policy ( school) and the need to be acknowledged as the person who see's what difficulties current expectations are having on him (you) and for everyone to actually work from the child, with an open mind to a variety of, rather than one or another method of supporting him in motivational learning. He really needs everyone on his side, to appreciate what he can do and to use every method available to enable a positive progression that has at the heart of it his well being, self esteem and physical/cognitive development, AT HIS PACE.

 

Good luck, I wish you the continued strength to be your sons' voice and hope that all concerned with his progress have the openmindedness to get past a static/inflexible policy and that the argument ends in a positive conclusion for your son with a shared school/home vision for his future support.

 

Peggy

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Hi, I am trying really hard to be objective here, so forgive me if i accidentally get on my soap box!

Inclusion is a matter close to my heart because of the job in which i am in. I see so many examples of bad practice and to be blunt exclusion of children through the lack of vision and a basic inability to value every child as an indivudal. :o

 

Back to the subject.....

 

I am sorry but I find this absolutely outrageous that the head is unwilling to consider that for your child this system is just not an appropriate learning method.

 

Especially as you also have the OT on board.

 

Obviously the head is not fully aware of her duty under the Disability Discrimination act or Special educational needs and Disability act (2 examples they are more) Also Removing barriers to acheivement

 

The school is simply not meeting your childs needs, I personally feel that gives you grounds for complaint.

 

As an Inlcusion officer this is the sort of instance in which i would step in and either inform the head or remind her of her legal duty and also to encourage good practice.

 

I don't work with schools but i am sure there will be reference in legal documents to Inclusion and meeting individuals needs in documents refeering to a school environment. As somebody has already suggested there is certainly a strong emphasis on it in the new eyfs

 

I would be really interested to know how you get on

 

Sorry for the rant!

 

Jo

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Sorry just to add something else......

 

The school should have a disability equality plan under the disability equality duty which states how they meet the requirements of the Disability discrimination act (DDA)

 

Try asking the head for this- i wonder if shes even aware of it!

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Hi, I am trying really hard to be objective here, so forgive me if i accidentally get on my soap box!

Inclusion is a matter close to my heart because of the job in which i am in. I see so many examples of bad practice and to be blunt exclusion of children through the lack of vision and a basic inability to value every child as an indivudal. xD

Are you available for consultancy, jo? :o

 

Maz

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