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New Eyfs Publications


Guest Wolfie
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Over the weekend, I've come across two publications that look as though they'll be very useful in helping to implement the EYFS. I've ordered both but obviously they haven't arrived yet so I can't vouch for them. However, Vicky Hutchin always writes very readable stuff, with lots of examples and practical advice, and Early Education also have a good reputation.

 

I'll do a review when they arrive! :o

 

http://www.early-education.org.uk/ccp51/cg...ations:booklets

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Supporting-Childs-...6772&sr=1-2

 

Hope the links work! xD

Edited by Wolfie
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Both sound good. Please can you let me know what you think when you get them. I'm going to ask my headteacher if I can get both.

Let me know if there is anything else you come across.

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just to let you know I've read it and it's very good especially for delivering training/auditing practice! Has examples of good practice and reinforces the need for child centred planning etc.

I'm very impressed!

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Susan- I'm sorry I must I brought the only one at £12. I ordered it lsat night. I think it actually comes from 'Browse for Books' so don't know if you contact them direct they have it cheaper!

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Well I 've got hold of both publications now and am happy with them both!

 

Vicki Hutchin's messages are consistent across all her books - the nice thing about this one is that it embraces the whole of the EYFS rather than just concentrating on the "old" Foundation Stage. It's very easy to read and gives lots of practical examples. She lists and describes a very sound set of principles to underpin the observation - assessment - planning cycle which give a very good starting point from which to evaluate your current practice. There are lots of practical examples and case studies to dip into, as in her other books. One message that comes across loud and clear is that the only statutory summative assessment is the EYFS Profile, completed when a child is in the final year of the EYFS. At transition stages it is suggested that a summary of the child's achievements is completed in each of the six areas but not to the extent of marking off achievement of individual stepping stones or "development matters". However, what still worries me is that Ofsted still seem to be looknig for evidence of "value-added" during some inspections - we come back to the issue of inspectors being up to speed with good early years practice again, don't we! Well worth the money, I'd say, especially if you haven't got any of her other books.

 

The Early Education publication - Implementing the EYFS - also looks good, although I haven't had time to digest it properly. It is a set of five leaflets, each one examining a particular EYFS principle and outlining references to it in the framework and CD-ROM, practical approaches to improve effective practice, reflective questions to support self-evaluation. The titles of the leaflets are:

 

[*]Observation, assessment and planning

[*]Key person and interactions

[*]Partnerships - parents, professionals, community

[*]Organisation and routines

[*]A place for children to learn through play

 

Again, very readable leaflets and useful for self-evaluation and reflecting on current practice.

Edited by Wolfie
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Wolfie I think you raise a very good point. Whenever a good idea -target setting, tracking e.t.c is hijacked by the powers that be it is expanded into a mighty monster as everyone jumps on the bandwagon and tries to take it on a step further, and the good idea can get lost in the process. I do target setting in my foundation stage-it's called communication at the relevant time with both children and parents. You can make all the most wonderful displays you can imagine. but it doesn't necessarily mean you achieve anything without you actually getting in there and concentrating on the children. It's the doing that counts not the showing of what you are supposed to be doing. I know there will be people out there who do have wonderful displays and also do a good job in communicating -what I am learning, but I question is this an efficient use of our time?

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