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Mathematical Development Action


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This was one of the actions from my nursery's last Ofsted:

 

Make sure that children are actively encouraged to take part in a good range of activities which support mathematical development.

 

I want to deliver some training on this to my pre-school team. Any ideas on where to start or what to include?

 

I want it to be full of handy, user friendly ideas, for incorporating maths into all aspects of the day, and taking opportunity of spontaneous things that arise; rather than focus on planned activities - as my staff are fine with these.

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How about counting 'how many children are here today?' each day. Also how many have what for lunch...etc

Can chn work out how chn many are away if given the number of chn usually at setting? etc.

I find these sorts of things in daily routinue encourage chns independent math. skills, I have large numbers on the wall and chn often role play counting the number of chn here today developing addition/ subtraction one more/ one less type skills without having to formally 'teach' them in a teacher-led way.

Hope this helps :o

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Do you have an early years advisor that comes in to see you? You might find that they have some training materials, including activities and handouts, that you could use - or they might even be able to support you in delivering the training?

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I think the inevitable thing that happens when we focus on maths is numbers / counting and asking related questions to the point that children are bombarded with How many .....?, etc.

I would suggest the staff role model 'maths thinking out loud' first, then the 'pressure' is off the children to perform / answer questions and after seeing the adults 'do maths' they will follow.

 

In my preschool the adults used to 'count in' to start lunch time, ie: we would count to 10 then say 'go' at which point the children opened their lunch box. This evolved to a child asking if he could count, this then evolved with the children counting backwards, 5,4,3,2,1 blast off etc, so it then became child led. Like all other learning the 'maths' needs to be relevant to the children, so the sdults main skill is to exploit opportunities which are started by the children in thier play. Thomas The Tank stories are good for number recognition. I also have laminated A4 sheets with dice dots on them available on the dough table, the children to use or not as they wish. A number line ( pictures and numerals) with pegs for spontaneous use. I have a set of sensery draws, in one are a selection of 3D shapes for children to touch, move, explore. We often find patterns on our walks, ie: a fence with diamond shapes, a circle drain cover, numbers in the environment, doors, number plates, phone box etc.

 

Just the other day a new child who had started counted the dough balls in Polish, then another showed off her knowledge of counting in Italian, then I added French, all relaxed and non questioning 'play'.

 

Measuring can happen anywhere, just have tape measures, ribbons, string etc and the children will enjoy measuring for a purpose ( within their play). We once measured length of hair, stated out as a hairdressing role play.

 

Snack bar sharing is good for calculating, rather than how many raisins have you got? Adults just show an interest whilst someone is eating, "Wow, yo had 5 raisins now there are only 2, where did the other 3 go?, start a conversation about the numbers of raisins rather than questions. ( They know you know the answer, so why are you asking :o )

 

Peggy

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Teachers TV had a programme with puppets. They asked the children a question relating to maths and counting but the child could listen to the puppets answer and give that. Obviously if it was the wrong answer the puppet was in the wrong not the child. It stopped the children from being put on the spot while showing the correct answer.

 

Unfortunalty the only time I tried it a bright spark said the puppet hadnt said anything :o

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Unfortunalty the only time I tried it a bright spark said the puppet hadnt said anything :(

 

 

:oxD , There's always one isn't there!! :(

 

Good idea to take the pressure off though.

 

Peggy

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go onto Worcestershire grid for learning- there are some super maths bits on there!

 

i work in BHam and we have just paid Mercia lee to come and deliver us sone training- fab.

 

she does maths boxes- they are wonderful- a table top activitiy if you need one- children then do not even know they re doing maths

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