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Complex Difficulties


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We have a pupil in reception with difficulties indicative of a complex learning difficulty. The child insists on running about the unit causing chaos , hurting other pupils, using inappropriate language, refusing to comply and generally being very difficult. We have not had a diagnosis, but believe this child to have complex difficulties or possibly ADHD or both.

Any advice on strategies to try would be much appreciated. Staff are at the end of their tether and parents are desperate for additional help for their child.

Many thanks

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Did the child previously attend Preschool / Nursery? were there any concerns there?

Did you get a record of transfer report from them?

 

I am sure you have tried various strategies, looking at routine / environment / triggers / observations / etc, maybe now it is time to involve the schools SENCO.

 

It's good that parents are 'open' to support, as many can be in denial in these matters.

Hope you get the support you need soon.

Good luck.

 

Peggy

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Hi

Thanks for your reply.

Nursery were aware pupil has difficulties, but never set the wheels in motion!

Senco is involved, but assessments take time and in the meantime pupil is causing havoc. Impact on other pupils is immense and affecting their behaviour.

Tried visual cues, pupil mat etc but requires close monitoring at all times. Cannot rule out exclusion for this child. Very difficult for all concerned!

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I've personally always been against exclusion, basically because I feel that it is our role, and we should meet every childs needs. However, at a recent SENCO training this was discussed and the tutor said, actually by excluding a child it can help because you are saying, the situation is not effective for the child ( or others) and exclusion can actually get the wheels in motion a lot faster. Certainly gave me food for thought. Sad the resources, mainly manpower until assessments are done and programmes of support are in place, are lacking. :o

 

Difficult to advise on different strategies to try, is there any chance of getting more adult support to work with the child whilst assessments are done. Silly question I know, most probably the first one you asked your senco.

 

Hopefully more suggestions from others soon.

 

Good luck, for you, your staff, your class and the child.

 

Peggy

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Hi we have a child very similar to that described by you. We have made a visual timetable of his daily routine using pictures of him. Each morning we have to spend time with him running through his day. We also have a change of activity warning card to help ease transition between activities. We have a zero tolerance when he hurts staff or children in our class whereby we have to remove him from the class to allow him time to cool down. We have a special tray of work for him to go to when he finds whole class sessions too tricky. Hope this helps :o

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Hi Molly,

I have been in a situation where we had no option but to exclude in Reception. Although it sounds dire, so was the situation--much like yours--and when physical violence was compromising the other children's safety and that of the staff, drastic measures were needed.

 

We had tried to access support for the child in many different ways before this took place and support arrived very quickly. It is not in the LEAs interest to have a child of this age in the exclusion statistics and it may be that if your child is of compulsary school age, your LEA will react similarly.

 

Exclusion need not be permanent and could be short term to allow staff and children a breather. Obviously this will impact on the parents, but they may also be in a better position to ask for help.

 

We excluded, for short periods and always immediately violence occurred.

Sometimes you need to be cruel to be kind, good luck.

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Many thanks for your responses

The pupil is a risk to himself and all pupils and staff in the unit. The child is of compulsory school age. Exclusion of such a young child really is frowned upon, but unfortunately there may be no choice. Staff are exhausted and parents threatening to withdraw their children. I do feel sorry for the parents, but I believe they have chosen to avoid the reality of the problem and avoided seeking professional advice . Life must be very difficult living with the extreme behaviour on a daily basis.

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