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Tapestry

Visual Timetable Story Line


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Hi

 

I'm settling into a temporary teaching post in a school nursery and my boss wants to observe me using a story line (piece of yarn with pictures pegged on as the story develops) as I told her I tell stories with one sometimes. I am very nervous about being observed and she is coming at larger group carpet time (26 or 52) rather than small group 6 - 13 time. Many of the children are EAL a lot coming in with no English and I really want to try and capture their attention in this activity.

 

I have been meaning to make a visual timetable for the children using photographs of them in activities through the session. I then thought it could be good to introduce this on the story line saying that the story was true today and the authors are the children and the pictures are of the children and the nursery.

 

What does anyone think please?

 

Ade

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I haven't used a story line, but I think if I was going to do this I would stick to a traditional tale to capture the children's interest and to encourage their participation with the help of the pics.

Good luck with whatever you decide and let us know how it goes :D

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If you want a traditional tale go to TES resources website and look under Early Years and Goldilocks. Carla Booth has posted the story in pictures for using on a washing line. The pictures are her last file 'book' but the ideas to use it are under lesson plan. They are very good.

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hi there - i also am in a nursery where the majority of children are EAL - using something whihc they have experience & knowledge of is, i think, crucially important - especially if encouraging language is a focus/priority.

It sounds like a fantastic idea - & one i will be adapting (if you don't mind) into my setting - although i would have concerns about doing it with 52 children (I would make sure the pictures are A 4 or bigger)

Good luck with the observation - try to relax - i know thats easier said than done - i also turn into a wreck!!!!

Let us know how it goes :)

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There is always the problem of using photos of the children (especially with that many), that they will all want to stand up and see themselves in the photographs and the possibility of constant interuptions because children want to know where they are and which picture they are in. Obviously this does depend on your children but it might not be worth taking this risk if you know that you are being observed - just a thought! Perhaps a traditional story would be better!

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I think your idea of using a storyline including the children photos is great. And I love the idea of pegging them on a sequence line as you go - I've never done this before, but will certainly 'give it a go' now. Thank you for the idea.

 

I recently attended a course on language development and they showed a brilliant video (oops showing my age!) DVD, of Ros Bayley, although she used an emphathy puppet, the way she told the story could be used with your stroy line. She began the story with a sentance and then asked the children what they think happend next, she then used their thoughts to take the story forward, tweeking it slightly to make it make sense, the children used their imaginations, totally owned the story and got really involved.

 

I'ts possible that the children in this footage were familiar with this type of story telling and it might need a bit of practice to get the children used to the idea.

 

I also loved the fact that during the story session, children were very relaxed, some kept kneeling up, some fidgeted, but it didn't disrupt ofrdetract from their involvement and enjoyment. I believe a good storyteller creates a 'magical moment' as she/he tells the story by use of mood, tone etc and thus 'controls' the interuptions with her/his 'spell'. I feel sometimes story time magic gets spoilt by the 'sit still police' .

 

Ooops, just re-read you post didn't get the '52 children' first read. Ros Bayley had 14 at a max! Perhaps too much involvement for that many children - as someone else said, those at the back will not be able to see themselves in their picture and could cause mayhem - could be tricky. Perhaps a more familiar sequence but told with 'atmosphere' and a few tricks up your sleeve. If they think /begin to expect that 'something' (a few little props) are going to appear now and again' they should hopefully wait in anticipation.

 

 

 

Good luck with whatever you decide to do.

 

Monica X

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