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Identifying Special Needs In Nursery


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Hi.

We have a child in Nursery who has been with us since September and will be moving up into Reception this year. His behaviour is, for want of a better word, bizarre. He had very little conversation when he first came into Nursery, although Mum insisted that he was a clear speaker at home, and although we have noticed an improvement in this respect, his behaviour is still odd and like nothing I have come across before. We have made detailed observations of him and have identified certain patterns of behaviour, which we have discussed with Mum, but she doesn't appear to be especially concerned at this stage. Based on these observations, we are putting him onto EYA and writing an IEP for him. My concern is that we don't get a great deal of support from our over-stretched SENCO and I feel he's unlikely to be moved on to EYA+ quick enough. We would usually move on through the Speech Therapy route, but as the child is already known to them, they would not see him in nursery, and I couldn't get any extra information about the child. I'm probably missing something really obvious here - any advice? And is there a good source of information anywhere which might help me further identify the child's problem?

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"My concern is that we don't get a great deal of support from our over-stretched SENCO " this is worrying... get back on to your SENCO it is their job to help you!!!!! I don't intend to upset any sencos out there but we must not let children go through the net for even a short space of time. How about asking mum to get him refered by her gp to have someone to assess him. Talk to their health visitor if the child is under 5. Inclusion support service, family centre? Don't feel you have to struggle with this keep going back and they will help you. Good luck

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Guest Jillbetts

Hi bubblejack

You ready do need to get the parents consent before anything can be done to help this pupil. I have visited settings and have seen children who really need help, but have been unable to help because of the parents refusing to accept that something is wrong and that something needs to be done. Please do not label this child without professional help as this can panic the parents and they either remove the child to another setting or take them out and they disappear. Go to your SENCO it their job to support you and to ask for the appropriate help for that child.

Jill

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Can you schedule a meeting with the parents and the headteacher - this is a good tactic if your Head is good at consultations about SEN without instilling panic into parents. Make careful notes about your concerns, and then talk to the HT in advance and decide some diplomatic but constructive ways to express them to the parents. The SENCO could maybe also attend, although you need to tread carefully to not have too many adults. Only you know the best personalities to lead you forward with this mum. Maybe even the YrR teacher so that you can forward plan? (but whoever attends the meeting, you need to ensure that there is careful sharing of information before and afterwards)

 

Often a more formal meeting will concentrate minds and lead to a sharing of information so that you can then move forward with the first steps in assessment.

 

Good luck!

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What sort of bizarre behaviour does he exhibit? If Mum is not showing any concerns about it, is it because he doesn't exhibit the same behaviour at home, or do you think she hasn't really grasped how concerned you are?

I'd say the same as others before me......a friendly Health Visitor who the family trust is a godsend in this sort of case. Do you know the family's HV? He/She can usually start the ball rolling with Educational Psychologists and Paediatricians. If the family do get on well with their HV, ask if you can give her a call. Perhaps you could put it to Mum that, experienced as you all are, occasionally we all need a little help from other professionals, and you'd be really grateful if she would agree to you asking for help. That way, she might feel less intimidated about others getting involved if it's really to help you!

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Hi

I am SENco at my setting and yes i am overworked but if this child needs help your SENco is the person to pull on board. She/he will be able to advise you. Who else at your setting is concerned about his behaviour? What is his behaviour? If he is being seen by Salt he should already be on EYA+.

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You took the words out of my mouth Lou!

 

I am the senco at my setting and any child that we seek outside help for is automatically moved from EYA to EYA+

 

I am also interested in the bizarre behaviour though I am sure it is difficult to describe. It can be difficult to discover whether mum is really not concerned or whether she is sort of denying there is a problem ( which is understandable)

 

If the child has SALT is there no communication from her to you. Just a thought that may be a source of help or advice for you.

 

Hope it all works out OK - good luck

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Thanks for all your replies. I spoke to Mum today about some of our concerns and we agreed to monitor the child's behaviour for the next couple of weeks then meet to discuss some strategies. I intend to ask about contacting the health visitor at this point. I think Mum is possibly unaware of how unusual her son's behaviour is for Nursery, but I don't think he has much contact with other children of his age apart from in Nursery, so she may not be alert to his 'difference'. I'll also be pushing our senco to come and see him in action. I'll let you know how it all goes!

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