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Ideas For Outdoor Play


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hi, after asking about those little books of series I was recommended to ask on here first. Has anyone got any good ideas for outside play that link in with ELG's. Im in a special needs school with 8 pupils with Autism. Also any good ideas for sand and water play.

 

thanks

jo

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There have been some discussions on here before about activities for outdoor play. If you type outdoor play into the search box it should bring them up.

 

We tend to use outside as another classroom so anything related to your theme or your focus. We sometimes just have gross motor days scooters bikes etc.

Washing lines hanging and ordering numbers and letters of alphabet

Paint on walls wit hcoloured water - shapes numbers, letters, patterns etc..

Weaving using a large weavign frame.

Muscial instruments.

Chalking on walls and floor

Bubble makers

Gardening

Building with large foam bricks

Bit brain dead at mo but will keep thinkng

 

Are you well resourced for outdoor play?

 

Lola

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Hi jop

I think your request is a bit too broad! You can cover any ELG through outdoor provision :D Do you have any specific ELG in mind? Or any specific types of skills you want to develop?

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As Fox says it is possible to cover any ELG outdoor just as it is indoor (probably on a larger scale) Your post made me stop and think about what ELGs we can achieve outdoors and these are the ones I came up with for one simple role play activity. We put out cars (the ride in type) and trikes table cash register phone buckets of water sponges soap toy petrol pump various mark making tools paper coins CD player with a copy of 'Car Wash' (from Nemo which most of them are familiar with) there are always bricks and tools available outdoors too.

 

 

PSE

Continue to be interested, excited and motivated to learn.

Be confident to try new activities, initiate ideas and speak in a familiar group.

Respond to significant experience showing a range of feelings when appropriate.

Form good relationships with adults and peers.

Work as part of a group or class, taking turns and sharing fairly, understanding that there needs to be agreed values and codes of behaviour for groups of people, including adults and children, to work together harmoniously.

Understand what is right, what is wrong, and why.

Consider the consequences of their words and actions for themselves and others.

Select and use activities and resources independently.

 

CLL

Interact with others, negotiating plans and activities and taking turns in conversation.

Enjoy listening to and using spoken and written language, and readily turn to it in their play and learning.

Sustain attentive listening, responding to what they have heard by relevant comments, questions or actions.

Listen with enjoyment, and respond to songs and other music,

Extend their vocabulary, exploring the meanings and sounds of new words.

Speak clearly and audibly with confidence and control and show awareness of the listener, for example by their use of conventions such as greetings, ‘please’ and thank you’.

Use language to imagine and recreate roles and experiences.

Use talk to organise sequence and clarify thinking, ideas, feelings and events.

Link sounds to letters, naming and sounding the letters of the alphabet.

Use their phonic knowledge to write simple regular words and make phonetically plausible attempts at more complex words.

Read a range of familiar and common words

Know that print carries meaning and, in English, is read from left to right and top to bottom.

Show an understanding how information can be found in non-fiction texts to answer questions about where, who, why and how.

Use their phonic knowledge to write simple regular words and make phonetically plausible attempts at more complex words.

Attempt writing for different purposes, using features of different forms such as lists, stories and instructions.

Write their own names and other things such as labels and captions

Use a pencil and hold it effectively to form recognisable letters, most of which are correctly formed.

 

 

MD

Count reliably up to 10 everyday objects.

Recognise numerals 1 to 9.

Use developing mathematical ideas and methods to solve practical problems.

In practical activities and discussion begin to use the vocabulary in adding and subtracting.

Use language such as ‘more’

Begin to relate addition to combining two groups of objects

Use language such as ‘greater’, ‘smaller’, heavier’ or ‘lighter’ to compare quantities.

Use everyday words to describe position.

Use developing mathematical ideas and methods to solve practical problems.

 

KUW

Investigate objects and materials by using all of their senses as appropriate.

Find out about, and identify, some features of, objects and events they observe.

Ask questions about why things happen and how things work.

Build and construct with a wide range of objects, selecting appropriate resources, and adapting their work where necessary.

Select the tools and techniques they need to shape, assemble and join materials they are using.

Find out about and identify the uses of everyday technology

Observe, find out about and identify features in the place they live

 

PD

Move with confidence, imagination and safety.

Move with control and co-ordination.

Show awareness of space, of themselves and of others.

Recognise the changes that happen to their bodies when they are active.

Use a range of small and large equipment.

Handle tools, objects, construction materials safely and with increasing control.

 

CD

Explore colour, texture, shape, form and space in two or three dimensions.

Sing simple songs from memory, and match movements to music.

Use their imagination in art and design, music, dance, imaginative and role play and stories.

Respond in a variety of ways to what they see, hear, smell, touch and feel.

Express and communicate their ideas, thoughts and feelings by using a widening range of materials, suitable tools, imaginative and role play, movement, designing and making

 

 

 

All THAT from ONE activity WOW!

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At the mo we dont really use our outdoor space very well. This has made me realise the HUGE possibilities it offers.

 

Also while I am thinking about planning this has confused me slightly. Everyone seems to like and use the Norfolk style of long term planning where you split the ELG's across the year. However play activities and focussed activites generally cover more than one early learning goal. So if on your long term plan you have 2 ELG's for KUW to cover how does everyone plan and account for all the other ELG's you are covering through play etc?? Does this make sense??

 

The more I try and think of a good way of planning the more confused and frustrated I get!

 

jo

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It really doesnt matter if you repeat ELGs more than once a year or more than once a term for that matter the important thing is ensuring you cover everything and give the children as many experiences as possible to meet the ELGs. At least thats the way we work.

The activity I mentioned earlier had no adult focus and was completely led by the children the adults observed and responded to the children's requests for more resources. Sometimes its important to stand back and be amazed by the learning the children achieve without us.

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so your long term plan ensures that you cover all the ELG's but from there you basically see how it goes and plan activites that fit into your termly topic and from the activities work out what ELG's you think you are covering and from observations work out what ones the children have achieved?? sorry long sentence!!

 

jo

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so your long term plan ensures that you cover all the ELG's but from there you basically see how it goes and plan activites that fit into your termly topic and from the activities work out what ELG's you think you are covering and from observations work out what ones the children have achieved?? sorry long sentence!!

 

jo

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The Norfolk planning is medium term. We use our own adaption of it. The way we work and I am sure other people work in different ways (dont think there is a right or wrong :o ) is we 'brainstorm' as a team all the activities to fit our topic for that half term, then we hi light all the ELGs we will cover. I know some people look at the ELGs first then work out activities to fit really its a matter of working out what suits you, your class and your setting.

We use our medium term plans to inform our weekly/daily planning but in Foundation Stage only between 60%-40% of activies should be adult led, so sometimes the learning is child initiated and we need to be aware of this.

 

Hope that makes sense

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