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Area Signs/children Choosing Where To Play


Guest terrydoo73
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Guest terrydoo73

I have been posting on this forum earlier today and doing a lot of thinking about how we may improve things. Could any of you advise me if you follow this idea ...

 

When children come in for indoor play time do you gather your key children together in a group and present a series of pictures of the areas in which they can play and then give them their own symbols and ask them where they would like to play first? If so does this help children settle? I am thinking of implementing this system just to see if it would help 2 of our boys who are disrupting play for everyone else - I know we cannot single them out individually but thought if we tried this system it could lead to more purposeful play. I think I am correct in saying that this is along the High Scope lines in terms of planning play and then discussion is pursued at the end of the session but just thought we could introduce this gently so as not to force quieter children to talk but give them the choice of what to do first thing.

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Having just replied to your other post about these boys, I would say that a visual timetable would be a good idea - we were told to do this by our special needs advisor - to help our particular little boy to move on to another area of play, but also I think this is good practice to help new children or those with EAL to settle and understand the flow of the session.

 

We don't ask the children to post up their names by the activity they choose though, the children move around the activities themselves and we can be spontaneous and go with the flow of what interests them.

 

Jo

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As well as my previous post about our use of visual timetables with 5 of our boys we also have a photo album full of resource photos which is kept in the writing area so that children can use it to choose activities and staff can use it to help children make choices, esp good for those with little or no language

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Guest terrydoo73

Well we implemented the idea of using signs for the children to decide where they were playing. We gathered all the children around in a circle as they came in to the Playgroup, introduced Pooh bear and that he was here for a visit so wanted to get to know the children. We went around the circle with each child saying their name and then introduced the visual timetable on an A3 page. We have 14 pictures and the areas named beside each. The children then took their symbols and set them on the picture that they wanted to play with. The children were then told to move into the area they had chosen. While we were waiting for everyone to arrive it gave ideal opportunity for the children to chat to me about different things - yes some did hug the limelight and others were very quiet but I feel that if we continue with this policy and routine the children will eventually get used to it.

 

Unfortunately our euphoria was short lived as our 2 "difficult" boys tended not to play at all preferring instead to disrupt other childrens play and muck about with each other. The tone of the morning was a lot lower but still difficult to focus these 2 boys on the idea of choosing something to play with and actually doing it. We realise it will take time and are prepared to stick it out until we feel confident enough with how we are handling things. I am hoping that eventually we will get the children to not just say which area they will be going to but also what they plan to do in that area when there.

 

We have 3 new children starting next week which might cause problems in terms of having to focus on them settling in etc and therefore these 2 particular boys might realise they can let it rip. However we have put out some different resources which we are hoping will interest them.

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