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Just looking for peoples opinions on this... My school has a policy of getting children to write the learning intention on each piece of work. In reception where I teach, its pointless trying to get the children to write it, so I either write it myself which takes ages with 25 books, or I type little strips, and stick them (or sometimes the children stick them) onto their work. I can see the reasoning behind doing it, but sometimes I feel as though I am spending all my time doing things which are a bit meaningless to the majority of the children I teach. My books are monitored this week and I am sure I will be pulled up on either lack of work in them or learning intentions not on all work, personally I think in reception a hands on approach is much more meaningful anyway, would welcome other peoples views

 

Cheers

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I agree with your "hands on" approach. If you really have to "write" the L.O. on each childs work may I suggest you type multiples of a L.O. and print onto A4 size sticky labels/pages, cut and stick.

What happens if a child achieves more than, or other than the expected/ planned learning outcome? Do you have to write these all as well?

There appears to be two aims to this teaching method;

1. The child being aware of the focus of their work

2. recording of achievement

 

Good luck, I hope you can find a method that achieves both these aims within the context of "Hands on, active learning style for the children" alongside recognising and valuing their individual (own) achievements.

 

Peggy

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On re-reading my post, maybe you could consider a small group Plan, do, review method where a small group of children are introduced to the L.O. then when the activity/experience is completed the achievements are discussed and recorded as a group. This does tend to restrict the children to be required to achieve through only one experience rather than the holistic approach of learning within a variety of contexts.

 

Peggy

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Hi

 

I have scrapped our lit/numeracy books which I inherited when I arrived in Reception.

Instead I keep samples of work for the different areas showing progression. I keep these in individual folders which I will pass upto the Yr1 teacher (after talking to her she said she rarely looked at them but relied on verbal feedback from recpetion for each child- and this year has began to make use of the profiles!!!).

I find the folder of work more useful as I can include (lots of!!) photocopies of work they produce independently e.g. in graphics area/ roleplay which often highlights where successful or less successful work has taken palce in shared/ guided writing/ reading/ maths etc sessions.

I ok this with FS manger and headteacher and spoke to Yr 1 teacher so they know what to expect.

I do follow the schols marking policy and use annotation on guided work but with inependent work during our FS unit time I tend to mark it as independent after I have checked with whoever is workingin there if they gave any input etc.

I have to say I much prefer to see how children are appyling their learning in these independent activities and display them prominenyly in the classroom and use these extensively for assessment/ profiles.

 

Hope this is of some use.

 

Lis

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