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I'm wondering if anyone has a simple but effective way of telling/showing Reception children what a sentence is? I've got lots of children who can tell me I've forgotten to use a capital letter, finger spaces and a full stop when I'm modelling writing, but who are still not secure on what a sentence actually is.

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Ok here goes, does it not have to make sense fully by itself? I'm sure better people than i will have other ideas.

Well yes, of course, and they do like catching me out if I write something nonsensical. I am hoping that perhaps someone has a little chant, song or rhyme they use.

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I stand corrected a sentence can have just one word. ie: Go. or Run! or Where?

 

found this: writing centre

 

Hope this helps, it gives an example of a one word sentence; then extended to a two word sentence adding on from the one word sentence; then extending it further to become compound and complex sentences; all originating from the first word 'Ice'.

 

Peggy

 

p.s. As you can see, I am the queen of long sentences, :o

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Just had a thought, maybe you could have, for example, a four word sentence. Four children hold a card with one word each on it, they stand in a line in the correct order, can they still make a sentence using only three of the words (one child sits out), Can they make a sentence adding a fifth word? Can any of the children think of a word that could be added? Or have another word ready for another child to hold and join the line.

 

Does this make sense?

 

The sun is shining.

Is the sun shining?

The sun is shining brightly.

Is the sun shining brightly?

 

Maybe try this with one, two and three word sentences. Have some children holding the cards whilst the rest of the class read out loud, the sentence, as they form their line. Give out additional words for more children to join in the line. Some of the children could be holding question marks and full stops, comma's etc. All the words would have to be written in lower case but once the sentence has been formed ask the children what letter needs to be made into a capitol letter ie: in example above, first sentence it would be the letter T.

 

You could use different coloured card to identify which words are verbs, subjects, adjectives etc.

 

Peggy

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We have actions for our sentence grammar work. So for example capital letter at the beginning is an A- Shape above your head (a bit like YMCA xD ). Finger spaces we use our index finger and for a full stop we punch forwards. Ros Wilson advocates this in her Big Writing materials.

 

As to how you get the words in the sentence, we start with word cards on the carpet and ask the children to mark it using the actions. Obviously we don't call it marking :o

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