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Story Suggestions Please


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Hi,

 

I have an interview next Thursday where I am required to read a story to a reception class for 15 minutes. After the story I am expected to do a short discussion with the children.

 

Just wondering what books you think would suit this purpose really well while engaging the children at the same time?

 

I am already so nervous as I love the school and want to make a good impression.

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Matilda, first of all good luck! Choose a book that you love and can read well or a story with props and puppets perhaps to tell but the most important thing is that you are comfortable with the story and enjoy it and then you will be less nervous and more able to relax and interact with the children.

My own personal favourites are "Elmer","Peace at Last", "The Gruffalo", "When mum turns into a monster" and "Whatever next". Your discussion would obviously relate to the theme of the story or the characters, think about the literacy objectives that children will have covered, or even what did they like best and why?

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Thanks for your reply.

 

I love the stories you suggested Susan but I was wondering if it would be better to read something they would be less familiar with. Or is it better to stick to the tried and tested?

I was thinking something that I could relate to a personal experience would be great for encouraging discussion. What do you think?

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I would pick something they could join in with - Farmer Duck "How goes the work" or The very Hungry Caterpillar - try and get the big book size - as Susan says props or puppets are a must.

Do you know the children - You must have something up your sleeve for any tricky customers sorry - special helpers.

Take in a basket of real fruit for smelling and identifing - ask your local supermarket they may give you some FOC if you say they are for school.

Props if you have a small caterpillar puppet - one came with our big book. you could cut out some fruit shapes and string them up on a washing line ask children to hold them while you munch your way through them with your puppet.

Finish with a song - There's a tiny caterpillar on a leaf wiggle wiggle.

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I'd certainly agree with all the above Matilda especially the idea of props. I know that when we do stories we try to engage the children first by presenting a box with the props inside (of course that gets their interest straight away)

When our Nursery teacher applied for a post she brought in a huge box tied with a beautiful ribbon inside were lots of props to support the retelling of Handa's Surprise. The children were enthralled and the Headteacher loved it...

best of luck :D

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Thanks for your suggestions.

I love the idea of using props to encourage discussion.

How do you use the props to best advantage, do you introduce them at the beginning or during the story? I am abit worried about interrupting the flow of the story if you know what I mean.

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When I started teaching we were expected to have a repertoire of stories we could tell with out a book. There were no BIG BOOKS unless you made them, which we also had to do.

You can use props in a number of ways - it depends on your focus.

Tell the story from scratch with out a book using the props- three bears and Goldilocks.

Read the book and keep them until the end to retell the story.

Use a puppet to hold a pointer to point at the words or pictures.

Or if you have a number - the animals from Mr Gumpys Motor car - give them out for children to look after as they appear in the book - the danger here is they may start playing with them and not listen to the story, but this is a good way of getting a session of role play started - have a car in the role play area it need only be a cardboard box or a few chairs. Send children off with the task of taking the animals on a journey which they can tell you about later.

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Hi there, you may have already though of this, but don't forget to decide beforehand how you will start your discussion, i.e. will you ask them to put their hands up first when they answer questions? Otherwise you could have everybody calling out.

G

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Matilda, you can not guarantee that any story you read will not be a known story. What you can make sure though is that you like the story and are comfortable with what you are going to do with it. If you feel comfortable going with a story that you can relate a personal experience to then that is an excellent choice.

 

Remember that whatever you do half an hour is not very long and yet could seem like forever if it all falls flat! You have had some excellent suggestions but make sure that you finish what you had planned.

 

Also remember to set your groundrules for the discussion, if you have been asked to read a story and discuss it it sounds as if they want to see how you interact with the children and how you manage them.

 

It may be that you will be asked about how you could develop this further ie the other ideas about role play etc but stick to your described task.

 

Good luck.

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Thanks to you all for your ideas and words of encouragement. I think I will end up doing a well known story becuase as you say the main thing is that I am comfortable with it. Let's just hope I don't get a chorus of, we've read that one!

I plan to make my expectations clear at the beginning and will reinforce and praise throughout. Thanks again!

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Good for you, hope all goes well. Do let us know.

You can always acknowledge that the chidren may know the story and tell them its your favourite! And if they tell you they've heard it, its nice to listen to good stories more than once!!

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Thanks Susan, I am hoping my excitement about the book will be infectious. Here's hoping!

 

I will let you know how I get on.

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Thanks to you all for your ideas and words of encouragement.  I think I will end up doing a well known story becuase as you say the main thing is that I am comfortable with it.  Let's just hope I don't get a chorus of, we've read that one!

I plan to make my expectations clear at the beginning and will reinforce and praise throughout.  Thanks again!

29896[/snapback]

 

I expect you already have a response to "We've had that one " I always say "Good because I'm going to get you to help me."

 

Good Luck for next week, let us know how it all goes.

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Hi,

 

I have an interview next Thursday where I am required to read a story to a reception class for 15 minutes.  After the story I am expected to do a short discussion with the children. 

 

Just wondering what books you think would suit this purpose really well while engaging the children at the same time?

 

I am already so nervous as I love the school and want to make a good impression.

29817[/snapback]

 

 

Hi matilda, i had to do this for my interview last year. after many hours deliberating over a story i chose The Enormous Turnip. I got the character masks from Claires Accsessories-only a £1 each and my mum made a simle fabric turnip (or you could just pretend!) the kids and interviewers loved it and i got the job!! :o

 

Hope this is any help! good luck!!

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Thanks, I don't think I have ever spent so long trying to choose a story, I'm even dreaming about it! How sad is that? :D

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Dear Matilda

A quick suggestion (it may be no good) . I have just borrowed the NEW Eric Carle book form our local libary for my own daughter ... It's called 'Ten Little rubber ducks' - it covers ordinal and cardinal numbers and could easily be linked to a discussion of the authors' other books - there's an Eric Carle website too which gives info on how he makes his pictures. It's based on a true story about a shipment of rubber bath toys that was lost overboard and were then tracked as they floated ashore. lots of animals - ordering , opportunities to retell maybe with headbands of the animal characters.... I have the feeling it might be a firm favourite with schools once it gets there!

- chances are the children might not have seen it as it was only published this year ?

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Whoops forgot to say .. there's a squeaker on the last page - they're always a hit even for the most wriggly of children !

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I am still between 'Owl Babies' and the 'Where's my teddy' series by Jez Alborough. I do love his books!

 

Not long to go now - Aragghh

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I don't suppose anyone has a lesson plan format for a storytelling session.

 

What should I include?

I thought about the area of learning, my objectives, questions to ask, sequence of session, how I could extend to other areas of learning. Because I don't know the children I am not sure about differentiation. Anything else?

 

Thanks!

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I would just do your story planning using the headings you had mentioned but indicate what you would do to support Special needs i.e sit near the front, or use the LSA to redirect them and keep them on task.

Also identify a few questions you would use for the gifted and tallented children in the class. I don't think you would be expected to know who these children are but you could ask the class teacher who they are before you start. It is the overall impression you make they are interested in.

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I read Owl Babies to 30 reception children using props and it went well but I must admit I was very nervous in the interview. I got good feedback so I will have to get applying again. I will know what to expect now at least, i just need to get better at selling myself.

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