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Hi Fellow practitioners

 

I am a 3rd year Foundation Degree student doing a research project on Risky Play

Please, please, please if you have 5 minutes spare could you respond to the questions below. The information gained will be useful in my project.

Your thoughts are of the utmost value

Thank-you in advance for your support

Risky Play

 

I am conducting a study into risky play with a view to creating a policy for my nursery setting to adopt in order to enhance the children’s play experience. The information from these questions will hopefully provide me with information to support the process.

 

1. In your opinion what is Risky Play?

2. What are your attitudes to Risky Play and why do you think you have them

3. In the light of current legislation, what is your opinion on the current provision for risky play in the setting.

4. How can we improve risky play provision in the setting

5. What opportunities are there in your local authority for training on Risky Play

 

Thank- you for taking time to respond to these questions

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Do you want us to message you or email you or just add to the thread with our answers?

 

 

Hi there, thanks so much for your response I'd really appreciate your imput:o) if you would like to respond on the thread directly that would fine, or if you want to email me at nursery@anglia.ac.uk that would also be fine.

 

Thanks once again!

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ooh, are you based in the University?

 

I studied with Anglia Ruskin a few years ago (ICT), an online course.

 

I have some thoughts on your research subject but don't currently work in early years. I used to own my own preschool but sold up in '97 to become a foster carer. Do you want views from current practitioners or a wider feild of participants?

 

Peggy

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darling ladies, I wonder if I might hijack this topic and ask you to share any thoughts on Risky Play with me too please?? I am behind wwith my research into this and HAVE to get finished soon! Thankyou .........my apologies to the original poster xxx

Edited by narnia
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Guest jane707

I am a childminder I hope my answers are useful!

 

1. In your opinion what is Risky Play?

Risky play is any play where children take risks - using sticks, climbing, running on a surface where they might fall, walking on a wall etc.

 

2. What are your attitudes to Risky Play and why do you think you have them

I would like more risky play but I am always concerned about parents reactions if their children have accidents. We live in an ever more litigious society.

 

3. In the light of current legislation, what is your opinion on the current provision for risky play in the setting.

I encourage children to do their own risk assessments and to consider risk before playing in situations where they might be hurt. I would love to offer more risky play but I look after babies so even resources like Hama beads have to be risk assessed and often cannot be used.

 

4. How can we improve risky play provision in the setting

More staff! If there were 3 of me I could supervise all the children at the same time :)

 

5. What opportunities are there in your local authority for training on Risky Play

There have been some outside play courses which have touched on risky play. I also attended an excellent talk by Helen Bilton at last years' Manchester early years exhibition. I have completed Playwork level 3 and that taught me a lot.

 

I hope that helps :o

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Here are my thoughts;

 

 

1. In your opinion what is Risky Play?

The term risk means.... ‘the danger that injury, damage, or loss will occur.’ (Encarta dictionary)

For me ‘Risky Play’ is a way that children are exposed to risk in a safe way, planned by adults who know their developmental abilities, so that the children can learn to judge their own capabilities, skills, and own judgements. Risky Play also enables children to face their fears such as a fear of heights, in a supervised manner. It helps children grow in confidence, to have the aptitude to face challenges, gain a sense of achievement, learn about and recognise risks for themselves.

 

2. What are your attitudes to Risky Play and why do you think you have them

I am not risk averse, I believe that adults often underestimate children’s abilities and therefore hold them back when avoiding risky play. Risk is a subjective term, for some a child aged 3 yrs cutting an apple with a normal kitchen knife would be deemed ‘risky’ whereas I think that this is a non risky activity as long as the child has been shown how to use the knife safely, and is supervised as the child learns to use it, then left to use it once practised in this skill. I used to use woodwork tools within my setting, adult tools rather than children’s versions (which I found to be flimsy and not much use). A child will not saw a finger off, whilst sawing wood, if the child touches his/her finger with the blade, the child stops sawing, learning to concentrate on where the blade is placed.

I was fortunate to spend some time in Sweden to learn about their pedagogy,( children aged 2-7 yrs). We spent most of the time outdoors, climbing tree’s, pond dipping, rope swinging, and even making waffles on an open fire on the beach. ( at the time I thought, goodness what would social services make of this at home!!)

 

3. In the light of current legislation, what is your opinion on the current provision for risky play in the setting.

Not sure what legislation you are referring to but I think that many settings are risk averse because they do not understand legislation. I would think that as long as any play is well planned, meets the developmental needs of the children and is provided under appropriate supervision then no laws are being broken by providing ‘Risky Play’. To deny children the opportunities of risky play because of being risk averse could be deemed as not planning to children’s developmental needs, thus not meeting the EYFS curriculum. Providers do need to have the courage of their convictions to challenge anyone (such as Ofsted, managers, head teachers, etc) who say their provision is too risky, as previously said, risk can be measured subjectively. So, a provider needs to be able to justify their ‘risky play’ through facts such as why they know it is safe for each child to participate in, this could be done through records in the child’s learning journey, risk assessments, evidence of success. To ensure that ‘play’ is planned through environment provision and specific activities, and that it is supervised as required by ratio’s, would ensure that any provider could not be charged with neglect (children act)

 

4. How can we improve risky play provision in the setting

Training – for staff and parents and regulators / inspectors / advisors

Equipment / space / time / resources.

Attitudes need to change.

Understanding of what is meant by ‘risk’

Abolition of myths ie: paper toilet rolls can cause illness.

Agreed measures of risk.

Understanding of the benefits of risky play.

Understanding of the detriment to their development if children are not given the opportunities to experience risky play.

Knowledge on legislation regarding risks

How to manage risk

Procedures if risky play results in injury.

Agreed levels of injury which are deemed inevitable / acceptable to enable learning life skills. Ie: a scratch to the finger by a saw. A graze to the knee, a twisted ankle etc.

 

5. What opportunities are there in your local authority for training on Risky Play

 

I can’t answer this as I do not currently work in a setting but when I did (2007) the LA didn’t make me aware of any training available.

I think that any training should need to start with individual’s principles and values to look at attitudes towards risky play. I don’t think it should dictate what can and can’t be done. Also it would be useful to look outside of the UK for inspiration.

 

 

I hope these thoughts help in your research.

 

Peggy

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Here are my thoughts;

 

 

1. In your opinion what is Risky Play?

The term risk means.... ‘the danger that injury, damage, or loss will occur.’ (Encarta dictionary)

For me ‘Risky Play’ is a way that children are exposed to risk in a safe way, planned by adults who know their developmental abilities, so that the children can learn to judge their own capabilities, skills, and own judgements. Risky Play also enables children to face their fears such as a fear of heights, in a supervised manner. It helps children grow in confidence, to have the aptitude to face challenges, gain a sense of achievement, learn about and recognise risks for themselves.

 

2. What are your attitudes to Risky Play and why do you think you have them

I am not risk averse, I believe that adults often underestimate children’s abilities and therefore hold them back when avoiding risky play. Risk is a subjective term, for some a child aged 3 yrs cutting an apple with a normal kitchen knife would be deemed ‘risky’ whereas I think that this is a non risky activity as long as the child has been shown how to use the knife safely, and is supervised as the child learns to use it, then left to use it once practised in this skill. I used to use woodwork tools within my setting, adult tools rather than children’s versions (which I found to be flimsy and not much use). A child will not saw a finger off, whilst sawing wood, if the child touches his/her finger with the blade, the child stops sawing, learning to concentrate on where the blade is placed.

I was fortunate to spend some time in Sweden to learn about their pedagogy,( children aged 2-7 yrs). We spent most of the time outdoors, climbing tree’s, pond dipping, rope swinging, and even making waffles on an open fire on the beach. ( at the time I thought, goodness what would social services make of this at home!!)

 

3. In the light of current legislation, what is your opinion on the current provision for risky play in the setting.

Not sure what legislation you are referring to but I think that many settings are risk averse because they do not understand legislation. I would think that as long as any play is well planned, meets the developmental needs of the children and is provided under appropriate supervision then no laws are being broken by providing ‘Risky Play’. To deny children the opportunities of risky play because of being risk averse could be deemed as not planning to children’s developmental needs, thus not meeting the EYFS curriculum. Providers do need to have the courage of their convictions to challenge anyone (such as Ofsted, managers, head teachers, etc) who say their provision is too risky, as previously said, risk can be measured subjectively. So, a provider needs to be able to justify their ‘risky play’ through facts such as why they know it is safe for each child to participate in, this could be done through records in the child’s learning journey, risk assessments, evidence of success. To ensure that ‘play’ is planned through environment provision and specific activities, and that it is supervised as required by ratio’s, would ensure that any provider could not be charged with neglect (children act)

 

4. How can we improve risky play provision in the setting

Training – for staff and parents and regulators / inspectors / advisors

Equipment / space / time / resources.

Attitudes need to change.

Understanding of what is meant by ‘risk’

Abolition of myths ie: paper toilet rolls can cause illness.

Agreed measures of risk.

Understanding of the benefits of risky play.

Understanding of the detriment to their development if children are not given the opportunities to experience risky play.

Knowledge on legislation regarding risks

How to manage risk

Procedures if risky play results in injury.

Agreed levels of injury which are deemed inevitable / acceptable to enable learning life skills. Ie: a scratch to the finger by a saw. A graze to the knee, a twisted ankle etc.

 

5. What opportunities are there in your local authority for training on Risky Play

 

I can’t answer this as I do not currently work in a setting but when I did (2007) the LA didn’t make me aware of any training available.

I think that any training should need to start with individual’s principles and values to look at attitudes towards risky play. I don’t think it should dictate what can and can’t be done. Also it would be useful to look outside of the UK for inspiration.

 

 

I hope these thoughts help in your research.

 

Peggy

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Share on other sites

Here are my thoughts;

 

 

1. In your opinion what is Risky Play?

The term risk means.... ‘the danger that injury, damage, or loss will occur.’ (Encarta dictionary)

For me ‘Risky Play’ is a way that children are exposed to risk in a safe way, planned by adults who know their developmental abilities, so that the children can learn to judge their own capabilities, skills, and own judgements. Risky Play also enables children to face their fears such as a fear of heights, in a supervised manner. It helps children grow in confidence, to have the aptitude to face challenges, gain a sense of achievement, learn about and recognise risks for themselves.

 

2. What are your attitudes to Risky Play and why do you think you have them

I am not risk averse, I believe that adults often underestimate children’s abilities and therefore hold them back when avoiding risky play. Risk is a subjective term, for some a child aged 3 yrs cutting an apple with a normal kitchen knife would be deemed ‘risky’ whereas I think that this is a non risky activity as long as the child has been shown how to use the knife safely, and is supervised as the child learns to use it, then left to use it once practised in this skill. I used to use woodwork tools within my setting, adult tools rather than children’s versions (which I found to be flimsy and not much use). A child will not saw a finger off, whilst sawing wood, if the child touches his/her finger with the blade, the child stops sawing, learning to concentrate on where the blade is placed.

I was fortunate to spend some time in Sweden to learn about their pedagogy,( children aged 2-7 yrs). We spent most of the time outdoors, climbing tree’s, pond dipping, rope swinging, and even making waffles on an open fire on the beach. ( at the time I thought, goodness what would social services make of this at home!!)

 

3. In the light of current legislation, what is your opinion on the current provision for risky play in the setting.

Not sure what legislation you are referring to but I think that many settings are risk averse because they do not understand legislation. I would think that as long as any play is well planned, meets the developmental needs of the children and is provided under appropriate supervision then no laws are being broken by providing ‘Risky Play’. To deny children the opportunities of risky play because of being risk averse could be deemed as not planning to children’s developmental needs, thus not meeting the EYFS curriculum. Providers do need to have the courage of their convictions to challenge anyone (such as Ofsted, managers, head teachers, etc) who say their provision is too risky, as previously said, risk can be measured subjectively. So, a provider needs to be able to justify their ‘risky play’ through facts such as why they know it is safe for each child to participate in, this could be done through records in the child’s learning journey, risk assessments, evidence of success. To ensure that ‘play’ is planned through environment provision and specific activities, and that it is supervised as required by ratio’s, would ensure that any provider could not be charged with neglect (children act)

 

4. How can we improve risky play provision in the setting

Training – for staff and parents and regulators / inspectors / advisors

Equipment / space / time / resources.

Attitudes need to change.

Understanding of what is meant by ‘risk’

Abolition of myths ie: paper toilet rolls can cause illness.

Agreed measures of risk.

Understanding of the benefits of risky play.

Understanding of the detriment to their development if children are not given the opportunities to experience risky play.

Knowledge on legislation regarding risks

How to manage risk

Procedures if risky play results in injury.

Agreed levels of injury which are deemed inevitable / acceptable to enable learning life skills. Ie: a scratch to the finger by a saw. A graze to the knee, a twisted ankle etc.

 

5. What opportunities are there in your local authority for training on Risky Play

 

I can’t answer this as I do not currently work in a setting but when I did (2007) the LA didn’t make me aware of any training available.

I think that any training should need to start with individual’s principles and values to look at attitudes towards risky play. I don’t think it should dictate what can and can’t be done. Also it would be useful to look outside of the UK for inspiration.

 

 

I hope these thoughts help in your research.

 

Peggy

 

 

Hi Peggy, yes we are situated at the University, thanks very much for all your imput the infomation you have provided is really usefull!

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I am a childminder I hope my answers are useful!

 

1. In your opinion what is Risky Play?

Risky play is any play where children take risks - using sticks, climbing, running on a surface where they might fall, walking on a wall etc.

 

2. What are your attitudes to Risky Play and why do you think you have them

I would like more risky play but I am always concerned about parents reactions if their children have accidents. We live in an ever more litigious society.

 

3. In the light of current legislation, what is your opinion on the current provision for risky play in the setting.

I encourage children to do their own risk assessments and to consider risk before playing in situations where they might be hurt. I would love to offer more risky play but I look after babies so even resources like Hama beads have to be risk assessed and often cannot be used.

 

4. How can we improve risky play provision in the setting

More staff! If there were 3 of me I could supervise all the children at the same time :)

 

5. What opportunities are there in your local authority for training on Risky Play

There have been some outside play courses which have touched on risky play. I also attended an excellent talk by Helen Bilton at last years' Manchester early years exhibition. I have completed Playwork level 3 and that taught me a lot.

 

I hope that helps :o

Hi Jane

thanks for the info all responses will be useful

Caroline

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darling ladies, I wonder if I might hijack this topic and ask you to share any thoughts on Risky Play with me too please?? I am behind wwith my research into this and HAVE to get finished soon! Thankyou .........my apologies to the original poster xxx

 

 

Hi there, yes we would be happy for you to use the info people have given, would be great if you could answer the questions too!?

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