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Interview Activity Info!


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Hi i've got an interview for a foundation stage teacher where I want to do a phonics activity. The activity will be with 6~8 foundation Stage children for 15mins. However as i'm currently teaching in pre~school i'm not aware of what stage they will be at with their phonics learning at this stage in the year??What stage will they be at? Will they be blending and segmenting CVC words competently at this stage??

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It all depends on the children...our phase two group have just begun to segment and blend CVC words. This group are F2. All our other F2s are on phase 4, 5 and 6. F1s know all Phase 2 sounds but are still working on Phase 1. I hope this info is useful. :o

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It all depends on the children...our phase two group have just begun to segment and blend CVC words. This group are F2. All our other F2s are on phase 4, 5 and 6. F1s know all Phase 2 sounds but are still working on Phase 1. I hope this info is useful. :o

MMmmm, might be best to stick with an activity based around initial sounds just to be on the safe side as I don't know the group of children then at least they will all understand and be able to take part, what do you think?

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It depends on the children you will be working with...I should imagine that most F1s would know letter sounds and be okay with oral blending and segmentation at this time of the year. F2s may need something a little more challenging than initial sounds. 2day with my F1 group I did an activity where I had a bag of objects - pen, jug, tub, pan, bat, mug, cup, children selected an object, said the name of the object and then the sounds they could hear in the word. Most children could hear initial and final sounds, some initial sounds only and a few could hear all the sounds in the word.

 

There are some good phonics games (Phase 1) in the Letter and Sounds doc. and I just wanted to say that it would be a good idea to have something 'up your sleeve' to challenge the children if needed...

 

Good luck with your interview :o

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It depends on the children you will be working with...I should imagine that most F1s would know letter sounds and be okay with oral blending and segmentation at this time of the year. F2s may need something a little more challenging than initial sounds. 2day with my F1 group I did an activity where I had a bag of objects - pen, jug, tub, pan, bat, mug, cup, children selected an object, said the name of the object and then the sounds they could hear in the word. Most children could hear initial and final sounds, some initial sounds only and a few could hear all the sounds in the word.

 

There are some good phonics games (Phase 1) in the Letter and Sounds doc. and I just wanted to say that it would be a good idea to have something 'up your sleeve' to challenge the children if needed...

 

Good luck with your interview :o

 

 

expectations are that children will be secure at Phase 3 by the end of reception and ready to go into Year 1 on phase 4 to revise all they've forgotten in the holidays. So they should be able to cover a lot of the double sounds and read and write simple captions and sentences. I can't promise they all will, though! The games at ICT games & Phonics Play might give you an idea - Tell A T Rex and Rubbish Or Treasure are v popular with my children!

 

In my reception class, my poorest children know all the phase 3 sounds (although they are not secure on all of the digraphs) but are not applying them. They struggle when they meet digraphs within words. Some of them blend the last sound first. When segmenting, some of them can only hear the sounds in CVC words and not CvCC words eg wouldn't hear the 'n' in 'went' and would write 'wet'. My top group are fluent readers and will have a go at writing anything using the sounds they know and some they've picked up from reading, like 'wh'. They will write 6 or 7 sentences with full stops, capital letters and finger spaces. Sometimes they use 'and' and 'but' to join ideas in a sentence.

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