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Non- Fiction Writing About Dinosaurs Mixed Year 1/2 Class


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I hope someone can help,

Am an NQT who has an observation next week in a mixed year 1/2 class. I have to teach a lesson about non-fiction texts and our topic is going to be dinosaurs.

I want to make the whole class teaching interactive and fun- so l was thinking making puppets for children to see as visual when l say dinosaurs name. The objective is going to be - to be able to answer questions from a non- fiction piece of writing. So the higher ability will be reading a text about dinosaurs and answering questions about it. What do l do for the lower ability year 1. I was thinking they could arrange the words of a sentence about a dinosaur to make sense and then draw an illustration. I dont know- Should they all be trying to achieve the objective???

Has anyone got any planning at all to do with non-fiction and dinosaurs- l would be so greatful to see some great ideas and also what to do with the lower abilty. Also do l have to work with a group - Its just they will be quite involved reading the text to answer the questions- there is no room for guided writing- ??????

I hope someone has taught this topic- or even better has lesson plan that they did that worked well for a non- fiction lesson about dinosaurs,

Many thanks xx

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I don't teach year 1 or 2 so not really the right person to help but didn't want to read and run. I'm sure someone will be along soon to advise.

 

I teach reception, in my opinion it doesn't matter if you don't fit in guided writing into a session, not literacy lessons have to be guided writing. The way I approach finding information from non-fiction texts is usually through guided reading where all children would have a copy of the book, they would read it and then have to find answers to questions orally. Maybe this would help your low ability children if you have such books? The books need to be at their reading level though.

 

I did my teaching practise in year 1 a couple of years ago and did the topic of dinosaurs. For non-fiction work, the children each had a picture of a dinosaur (they could choose one), they then had to write a caption about the dinosaur for a non-finction class book. The high ability children had to find facts from non-fiction texts and the LA were given a few facts which I had types up and were read to them. Probably not what you're looking for.

 

I don't think all children should be working to the same learning objective as this doesnt show very good differientation if they are but maybe I'm wrong. Maybe you could work with your group of LA children to support them if you feel your HA are more independent?

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When I tackled non-fiction with my reception class I began by going outside on a mini-beast hunt. I asked the children to record what they could find outside using clip boards (they loved this) I encouraged them to label their pictures. The next session involved us looking at a big non-fiction book where we looked at the various features of a information book - contents, index, glossary etc. We looked at labeling in the book as well thus making connections with what they did outside.

 

I am thinking that you could do a similar thing but maybe hide dinosaurs around outside or if you can I have used pretend dinosaur bones/fossels. I also put pretend bones in a tuff spot with sand - the children used small brushes to find the bones - then on clip board drew what they found. They could draw what they find and then maybe you could ask them to research the dinosaur they have found using a given report format i.e. what did it look like?, what did it eat?, how did it move?, where did it live?. Ideas for whole class sessions could involve looking at video clips of dinosaurs, word games such as think of different words for big, small, hungry, extinct etc (link to the concept of a glossary),play true of false - come up with some fascinating facts that the children could respond to i.e. a T Rex was bigger than a double decker bus. My class really got into labeling pictures this could easily be done with dinosaurs and their special features. I have non-fiction plans for 2 themes growing and apes if you would like them I could attach. It may give you some ideas. Hope this is helpful.

NikkiMac

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Our year 2 teacher got the children to draw a pic of a dinosaur, then fold the paper over and write clues to describe it. They then read each others clues to try to guess what was under the paper. They loved it, and were really motivated but it was a build up of lessons, lots of talk and shared writing before they reached this point.

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When I tackled non-fiction with my reception class I began by going outside on a mini-beast hunt. I asked the children to record what they could find outside using clip boards (they loved this) I encouraged them to label their pictures. The next session involved us looking at a big non-fiction book where we looked at the various features of a information book - contents, index, glossary etc. We looked at labeling in the book as well thus making connections with what they did outside.

 

I am thinking that you could do a similar thing but maybe hide dinosaurs around outside or if you can I have used pretend dinosaur bones/fossels. I also put pretend bones in a tuff spot with sand - the children used small brushes to find the bones - then on clip board drew what they found. They could draw what they find and then maybe you could ask them to research the dinosaur they have found using a given report format i.e. what did it look like?, what did it eat?, how did it move?, where did it live?. Ideas for whole class sessions could involve looking at video clips of dinosaurs, word games such as think of different words for big, small, hungry, extinct etc (link to the concept of a glossary),play true of false - come up with some fascinating facts that the children could respond to i.e. a T Rex was bigger than a double decker bus. My class really got into labeling pictures this could easily be done with dinosaurs and their special features. I have non-fiction plans for 2 themes growing and apes if you would like them I could attach. It may give you some ideas. Hope this is helpful.

NikkiMac

 

Hi,

I would be absoloutly very greatful if you could attatch some kind of non- fiction planning- It sounds like l would really benefit from your skills here- So thank you in advance- It is really helpful! xx

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Our year 2 teacher got the children to draw a pic of a dinosaur, then fold the paper over and write clues to describe it. They then read each others clues to try to guess what was under the paper. They loved it, and were really motivated but it was a build up of lessons, lots of talk and shared writing before they reached this point.

 

Thank you so much such great ideas- amazing in fact xx

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Our year 2 teacher got the children to draw a pic of a dinosaur, then fold the paper over and write clues to describe it. They then read each others clues to try to guess what was under the paper. They loved it, and were really motivated but it was a build up of lessons, lots of talk and shared writing before they reached this point.

 

Thats fantastic idea for further on in the topic- thank you xx

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I don't teach year 1 or 2 so not really the right person to help but didn't want to read and run. I'm sure someone will be along soon to advise.

 

I teach reception, in my opinion it doesn't matter if you don't fit in guided writing into a session, not literacy lessons have to be guided writing. The way I approach finding information from non-fiction texts is usually through guided reading where all children would have a copy of the book, they would read it and then have to find answers to questions orally. Maybe this would help your low ability children if you have such books? The books need to be at their reading level though.

 

I did my teaching practise in year 1 a couple of years ago and did the topic of dinosaurs. For non-fiction work, the children each had a picture of a dinosaur (they could choose one), they then had to write a caption about the dinosaur for a non-finction class book. The high ability children had to find facts from non-fiction texts and the LA were given a few facts which I had types up and were read to them. Probably not what you're looking for.

 

I don't think all children should be working to the same learning objective as this doesnt show very good differientation if they are but maybe I'm wrong. Maybe you could work with your group of LA children to support them if you feel your HA are more independent?

 

Thats brilliant idea- so the LA children have a picture of a dinosaur each and they have to match a sentence to go with it. They could then be extended to think of another sentence to write about that dinosaurs appearance- what do you think? Also in terms of whole class teaching to maybe have each dinosaur and to pull out of bag and hopefully them to name the dinosaurs- Or a powerpoint presentation to get their attention- Am being my usual indecisive self and really going round in circles with this lesson- just so many things to get right xx

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Thank you all so much for your expertise on this. Am so unsure about it all its really not good but there you go!! My objective is to be able to answer questions from a non-fiction piece of text- but am scared that my lesson needs to be all singing and dancing and bit unsure if it is or not???

Also l have my phonic bit of teaching not actually phonics but sorting fact and faction into two coloumns about dinosaurs on cards- Is that acceptable in an assessed lesson/ Also how could you show the person who is assessing your lesson your assessment from this- Should l be going around and tiicking off the chn who have been able to achieve the objectives. How could you show this? Also how could you show AfL in this lesson??? I hope you can save me from my uncertainitys ,

Thank you so much it really helps xx

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Year 2 Non-fiction

Dinosaurs

 

Overview

• Pose questions and record these in writing, prior to reading. Investigate non-fiction books/ICT texts on dinosaur themes to show that they can give different information and present similar information in different ways. Use contents pages/menus and alphabetically ordered texts, for example dictionaries, encyclopaedias, indexes, directories, registers. Locate definitions/explanations in dictionaries and glossaries.

 

• Read text to gain information, finding the meaning of unknown words by deducing from text, asking someone, or referring to a dictionary or encyclopaedia.

 

• Write simple information texts incorporating labelled pictures and diagrams, charts, lists as appropriate. Design a simple website.

Edited by Marion
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Here I have attached my weekly plans for 2 non-fiction themes. I would highly recommend the book Ape by Martin Jenkins it is a fantastic example of a non-fiction book in a narrative form. The illustrations are amazing and the children loved this book - so much so I had parents coming in to ask me about the book and tell me that their children were drawing monkeys and talking about apes all week. As a result we went on a surprise visit to Bristol Zoo (the children only found out we were going on the morning we went!!) the parents were in on the surprise it was an amazing day - one I will remember for a long time.

NikkiMac

CLL_sum1_wk4.docx

CLL_sum1_wk2.docx

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Sorry added a different weekly plan - attached is the other non-fiction plan.

 

Thank you very much for that- But l can't actually open any of them because there encoded into something my PC does not recognise.

Sorry please could you send them in a different form . many thanks ;-)

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Also l have my phonic bit of teaching not actually phonics but sorting fact and faction into two coloumns about dinosaurs on cards- Is that acceptable in an assessed lesson/ Also how could you show the person who is assessing your lesson your assessment from this- Should l be going around and tiicking off the chn who have been able to achieve the objectives. How could you show this? Also how could you show AfL in this lesson??? I hope you can save me from my uncertainitys ,

Thank you so much it really helps xx

 

 

Phonics doesn't have to be part of your literacy lesson.

With regards to assessing - do you have a TA while you deliver your carpet session? You could maybe have your TA write observation notes of what children do and say? In my opinion not all children will be at the same level to be working from the same objective so the objective will need to be differentiated for the LAPs for example. I don't really believe in tick lists - but think that observations are a much more effective way of assessing as they tell you what the child did know. You can scribble on your plans during the lesson if you realise that some children have not grasped the objective so you can explain to your observer that you will revisit this with those children in a different way - this is the best way that AFL works in my opinion. Choose your learning objectives based on your knowledge of where children are and their appropriate next steps so hopefully all children will meet the objective. Hope that helps. xx

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Hi there,

Just to say good luck and do not panic! Re observer- provide them with copy of plan and clearly state the why and what for them so they can follow it.

Great plans NikkiMac, thankyou for sharing, I like your layout.

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Year 2 Non-fiction

Dinosaurs

 

Overview

• Pose questions and record these in writing, prior to reading. Investigate non-fiction books/ICT texts on dinosaur themes to show that they can give different information and present similar information in different ways. Use contents pages/menus and alphabetically ordered texts, for example dictionaries, encyclopaedias, indexes, directories, registers. Locate definitions/explanations in dictionaries and glossaries.

 

• Read text to gain information, finding the meaning of unknown words by deducing from text, asking someone, or referring to a dictionary or encyclopaedia.

 

• Write simple information texts incorporating labelled pictures and diagrams, charts, lists as appropriate. Design a simple website.

 

 

Hi Marion,

That sounds like what l hope to get from children in a succession of days- Where did you get this from?x

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