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Hello

I have an interview for a FS 1 full-time position on Thursday. I have been told to :

 

'Prepare a maths - problem solving activity that involves active engagement by the children'.

 

I have also got to take

'Evidence of planning and sample outcomes'.

 

In my panic, my mind has gone blank!! Regarding the planning - I will obviously take a lesson plan - but do you think they are asking me to take copies of my current PSRN (or any subject) plans? Feel exhausted already!

 

I'm not planning to use a IWB - as I've got out of habit of using one (I moved to FS in Sept and we don't have one in our room).

 

The letter says they are looking for a candidate who is prepared to show 'imagination and initiative' - just to add to the pressure.

 

Any help/ideas would be gratefully received.

Thanks

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Activity: Treasure Hunt (focus on PSRN: Numbers)

Hide objects/plastic numerals/laminated digit cards in the sand for children to find, sort, count, compare amounts, match to the appropriate numeral

• Hunt for two different sorts of objects e.g. the farm set animals – compare the number of cows and sheep. Say when they have found the same amount

• As above, but encourage counting and recognising of groups with one, two, three members

• As above, but encourage counting out up to 6 objects from a larger group

• Find the total number of animals by counting all the sheep and cows

• Hunt for 'one more'' sheep and encourage prediction of how many sheep we will have then

• Hunt for numerals of personal significance e.g, '4' if that is how old they are

• Find numerals 1 to 5, then 1 to 9, encourage naming and putting in to correct order

• Find the correct numerals to represent number of objects e.g. match '4' to the 4 sheep they have found

• As above but counting up to 10 objects, and use 'more' or 'less' to compare two numbers

 

Resources: different objects to hide e.g. farm animals, lego bricks; plastic numerals, laminated number cards

 

Key questions:

Have you got the same amount?

Have you got more cows than sheep?

Can you find 3 sheep?

If you find one more how many will you have?

How many cows? How many sheep?

How many animals altogether?

Can you count out 6 sheep?

Can you find the number 4?

Can you put all the numbers in order?

Which one comes next?

Can you find the right number to put with this group of sheep, so we know how many there are?

 

To encourage children to

Show an interest in numbers and counting

Use some number names and number language spontaneously

Use mathematical language in play

Compare two groups of objects saying when they have the same number Observe and use positional language

Use size language such as 'big' and 'little'

Use some number names accurately in play

Willingly attempt to count, with some numbers in the correct order

Recognise groups with one, two or three objects

Count up to three or four objects by saying one number name for each item

Recognise some numerals of personal significance/1 - 5

Begin to represent numbers using fingers, marks on paper or pictures

Find total number of items in two groups by counting all of them

Use own methods to solve a problem

Say with confidence the number that is one more than a number

Find items from positional/directional clues

Order two or three items by length/weight

Say and use number names in order in familiar contexts

Count reliably up to 10 everyday objects

Recognise numerals 1 – 9

Use developing mathematical ideas and methods to solve practical problems

Use language such as 'more' or 'less' to compare two numbers

Use everyday words to describe position

 

LOOK LISTEN NOTE:Observing, playing alongside and talking with the children. Do they show an interest in numbers? Can they count … with some numbers in the correct order … saying one number for each item. Can they compare numbers? Can they recognise numerals?

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Activity Plan: The Bad Tempered Ladybird– Interactive Story

 

Interactive story-making helps to provide a context for communication, language and literacy. When engaging children in ‘interactive story-making’ you can give particular attention to:

• providing opportunities for children to communicate thoughts, ideas and feelings and build up relationships with adults and each other.

• give opportunities for linking language with physical movement.

• providing time and opportunities to develop spoken language through conversations between children and adults, both one-one, in small groups and as a whole class. (Hendy, 2001)

1. Read the story of the Bad-Tempered Ladybird by Eric Carle. Discuss what could make the ladybird bad-tempered? Discuss what makes the children bad-tempered. Draw happy and sad faces on paper plates. Make a list of things that make them happy and things that make them cross. Put the paper plate faces under the appropriate lists.

2. Work with the children to retell the story. Involve children giving them opportunity to build the story tray with the props. Listen to their ideas and interpretations and accept their ideas place the storybook and the non-fiction book with the tray.

3. Make the story table accessible for as long as the children show an interest. Give children plenty of opportunities for child initiated story-telling as well as adult support sessions.

 

 

Key Vocabulary/Questions

 

Response to story – interaction with the text. Which children choose to read this story as an independent activity?

 

Can the children, Listen, join in, re-enact story. This will become an independent activity.

What would make a ladybird bad tempered?

It was hungry – what do ladybirds eat?

It was lonely – are there different types of ladybird?

It was tired – do ladybirds sleep?

 

How many?

How do you know?

Adult to provide guidance eg. “Is it the same?”

 

Ask children to show you how many animals does the ladybird meet- show them the pictures or objects so they can check answers

 

Ask “What do you think might happen next?” “Why?”

 

Adult Role/ Adapting the activity for individual children

Adult as initiator to read – to encourage conversation, questions & participation.

 

Give children time to answer. Be prepared for silences to give them thinking time. Take the beginning slowly. Try not to push the story forward yourself — this makes it your story not the children’s. Be confident in the children’s storytelling abilities.

 

Listen carefully to what is being said, observe body language. Show genuine interest. Invite children to elaborate. Offer your own experiences. Make suggestions and use encouragement to further thinking. Ask open questions and offer an alternative viewpoint

 

To encourage children to:

 

Personal, Social and Emotional development (PSED)

• Show an awareness of feelings of others

• Play co-operatively within a small group

• Understand the need to consider others

• Show a willingness to select activities and resources

Communication, Language and Literacy (CLL)

• Use story within play and discussion situations

• make up own stories with a little support

• maintain an idea or theme throughout a conversation

• sequence a series of events

• hear sounds in familiar words and links some sounds to letters

• identify some familiar letters.

• Begin to recognise familiar letters in different words

• recall the main characters in a story. relate the main events of a story in correct sequence

• interpret illustrations and relate them to the text

• discuss stories, identifying main characters, predicting what could happen next

 

Problem Solving, Reasoning and Numeracy (PSRN)

• Count reliably ladybirds and number of spots. Count animals in the story.

• Match numeral to set

• Understand that one number is more than another

• Use everyday words to describe the movement of the hands on the clock.

• Read the numbers on the clock, Beginning to use the vocabulary of time. Can use comparative language

• be aware of technology around them

• begin to understand that past events can affect the present and future. Is able to sequence events.

 

Creative development (CD)

• Create simple representations of events

 

 

Resources

 

The Bad-Tempered Ladybird by Eric Carle –

Are you a ladybird?

 

Large Tray/Tuff Spot

Environmental features (pebbles, fake grass, shells, leaves e.t.c)

Large Leaf (Au Natural)

Aphids (photo’s stuck on the leaf)

Clock (moveable hands)

X2 Ladybirds

Wasp – Beetle – Praying mantis – Sparrow – Lobster – Skunk –Snake –Hyena –Gorilla –Rhinoceros – Elephant –Whale

 

 

Bibliography

Hendy, L. (2001). Interactive Story Making . Retrieved June, 2006 from www.foundation-stage.info: http://www.foundation-stage.info/newfsf/ar...Article_143.php.

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COMPARE BEARS

Pattern and Sequencing

‘Mathematical development depends on becoming confident and competent in learning and using key skills. This area of learning includes counting, sorting, matching, seeking patterns, making connections, recognising relationships and working with numbers, shapes, space and measures. Mathematical understanding should be developed through stories, songs, games and

imaginative play, so that children enjoy using and experimenting with numbers, including numbers larger than 10.’ QCA (2000) Curriculum Guidance for the Foundation Stage, DfEE/QCA

 

 

 

Plastic bears in three sizes, three weights and four colours. Use for size-grading, mass comparison, counting and sorting. Bears are proportionally weighted to use on a balance for measurement discoveries. As children manipulate the bears to reproduce patterns they exercise visual and fine motor skills. The development of visual/motor integration skills is vital to success in many curricular areas, including colour recognition and pattern sequencing.

Resources/Additional Information

• Compare Bears

• Paper

• Pencils

• Pattern and Sequencing Cards

• Comparative size language and number cards

• Red, Yellow, Blue and Green trays

• Scales

Main Learning Intentions/ Assessment Opportunities

To encourage children to:

Problem Solving, Reasoning and Numeracy (PSRN)

• Show confidence representing numbers using own method of recording, Count objects

• Recognise and match numerals to appropriate set

• Estimate and make reasonable predictions

• Discuss possible outcomes in practical number problems and use the language of addition and subtraction in context

• Understand that one number is more than another, Use language more, less, fewer in a mathematical context

• Find one more or one less from a group of numbers

• Understand that the total is found by counting two groups

• Use comparative language of measurement

• Copy and repeat a recurring pattern

• Use positional language in play

• sort using simple criteria

 

Key Vocabulary/

Questions

Key vocabulary: on, in, under, behind, in front, next to, beside, in between, big, bigger, biggest, large, larger, largest, small, smaller, smallest, little, same, different, more, less

Count items

Giving and receiving requests– incorporating numbers

Talk with children about what they are doing

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Hello

I have an interview for a FS 1 full-time position on Thursday. I have been told to :

 

'Prepare a maths - problem solving activity that involves active engagement by the children'.

 

I have also got to take

'Evidence of planning and sample outcomes'.

 

In my panic, my mind has gone blank!! Regarding the planning - I will obviously take a lesson plan - but do you think they are asking me to take copies of my current PSRN (or any subject) plans? Feel exhausted already!

 

I'm not planning to use a IWB - as I've got out of habit of using one (I moved to FS in Sept and we don't have one in our room).

 

The letter says they are looking for a candidate who is prepared to show 'imagination and initiative' - just to add to the pressure.

 

Any help/ideas would be gratefully received.

Thanks

 

I would take that to mean the planning for your activity and the outcomes you might expect. You dont know these children after all?

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Carla

 

Thank you so much for your help. I really like your ideas. Isn't it strange when you get an interview - your mind can go blank - yet other people can come up with instant ideas.

 

I really appreciate your time and effort.

 

I'm going to use the buried treasure activities/ideas.

 

Take Care

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