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Boys Fine Motor Skills


killowengirl
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hello everyone me again. I wondered if anyone could tell me where I can reference the development of boys fine motor skills in respect of writing and developing this skill later than girls due to their muscle development please

killowengirl with many many thanks

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  • 4 weeks later...

No sorry I didnt. The only thing I could fine was sue palmer on teachers tv talking about the development of writin. she said girls develop fine mortor control earlier than boys because they play with fiddly things like polly pockets and small jewelry etc where as boys play large gross motor games such as super heroes etc instead so will develop those skills first if that is any good to you.

 

that article surfer girl is very interesting thank you for the link

killowengirl

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Hello there

 

How about 'Confident, capable and creative: supporting boys' achievements'.

 

Download on www.standards.dcsf.gov.uk or www.teachernet.gov.uk/publications ref-00682-2007BKT-EN

 

Its not specifically about writing though.

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I recently learnt at a training course that in boys the thumb muscles develop later than girls, thus it is more difficult for boys to use the pincer grip required for writing. Don't know where the trainer got this theory from though. :o

 

Peggy

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I have heard Helen Bromley use those very same words Peggy.

 

 

Thanks for that, do you know if she has a web site, I'd love to 'quote' her on this for my studies.

 

Peggy

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This is ringing bells, but can't quite place it yet.

 

Have you tried googling 'Gallahue'?

 

Gallahue D L 1989 Motor Development. Infants, children, Adolescents

 

Will keep thinking.

 

 

Also try Gallahue D L 1993 Developmental Physical Education for Today's children

 

Where he talks about ‘fundamental movement phase’

 

 

Try Needlman R D 1996 15th edn Growth and development

 

'usually girl's wrist bones are fully developed by age four years and five months, and boy's by age five years and six months (Needlman, 1996)' cited in Study Topic 12, Physical Development, E124

 

The Open University (2004) Study Topic 12 ‘Physical development’, E124 Supporting children’s learning in the early years, Milton Keynes, The Open University

 

Is that any help?

Edited by Deb
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