Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Individual education plans


Faye
 Share

Recommended Posts

How about starting from where s/he is at the moment? Perhaps observing the child's favourite activities, how long s/he is interested in them, any dislikes (getting paint on hands, soap, etc), and making an initial report based on these findings? Trying to gain eye-contact by lying on the floor opposite the child is a good way of starting to make a relationship with the child. Let us all know how you get on :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I know how difficult it is trying to assess a child who isn't really "at" the first stepping stone; there is very little to go on! Have you come across the P-scales, which are a very useful sort of ticklist which allows you to get down to specifics?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks very much for your suggestions, both. I found out about the P-scales from our advisory teacher; thank you :o

We had a break through this week; our little lad with no eye-contact loves playing with the water, so as long as we are prepared to spend most of the session soaked to the skin, we can get a reasonable relationship going!! He looks up occasionally now when his name is called, but not as much as we'd like.....still, it's improvement :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Faye,

I work in a special school and we look a lot a t the P scales which can be found on a government site .I can post this alter when I find it properly. What they do is look at levels way way below the National Curriculum and so you might well be able to find some ideas for tiny achieveable targets. Sorry if you know this already!

 

We also use a program called IEP Writer which has some very very basic targets on it . I wouldn't advocate just searching for these and using them if they don't fit your child, but they do jog the thought processess and serve as guidance sometimes.

 

One of the targets could be to get him to make a response to his name in some tiny way... a target that could last a long time I'm sure.

 

Good Luck

Kate

 

OOps sorry; Didn't read the replies before I wrote this. So much of this is old news.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Kate,

Thanks for the reference; they are indeed the P-scales for language and literacy.

The East Sussex EYDCP have produced the Curriculum Based Developmental Profile which presents the P-scales across the six areas of learning; it's really very detailed and great for assessing children you have concerns about.I believe it's going to be available for purchase in the near future. I'l try and find out when.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

 

I work in a special school, working with children age 2 to 5 in the assessment nurery.

 

We as a school use the P levels because most of the children in school are working below level 1 of the national curriculum. The P levels are the first National levels and although not perfect, at least the children are at last being recognised, and not just categorised as below level 1.

 

To help with writing IEP I have found PIVATS very useful. PIVATS stands for Performance Indicators for Value Added Target Setting. This is a document written by the Lancashire Education Authority, based on the P levels but further sub diveded into subsections. These sub sections can be used as realistic targets because special needs children need 'inchstones' not 'milestones' that they will find difficult to achieve. The only problem with PIVATS is that it is not based on Foundation headings, but can easily be used with a little thought.

 

 

If you wish to find out more you can log onto www.lancashire.gov.uk/education/pivats/intro1.avp

 

I hope this is useful.

 

Rosie :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

hiya Faye

Have a look at the birth to three matters pack for lots of things you can do - their are no ages, but stages of development. your recording can be simply a file with comments and photos of the child engaging in the tasks, dont forget to leave space for parental comments

lesley

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Kate, thanks for the link to the P scales. I will be interested to read them and perhaps use them for my SEN. children. I was advised not to use them unless a child did have a special need. Has anyone any ideas for FS1 children who need more specific statements than those in the steps? I would now like to go on the induction course for portage. Is anyone using this?

Thanks. Chris :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We used Portage a lot and it is really good if used well because the increments are so small. We find that the P scales still have incredibly big jumps at times and in some areas, so give it a go and good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

Hi,

  i work with children on the Autistic spectrum and making eye contact and responding to others is a big target for us in early years. i have recently completed an early bird brogram (details of which can be found on the NAS website) and their stratagy is communication and also social interaction, i use this and other stratagies with all my children and it is great to see the indp interaction and communication from my children i would recommend any SEN practioner, S:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)