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3d Shapes


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hello,

 

My recpetion children know their 2d shapes really well. I'm a bit stuck on what to do for 3d shapes though. Could somebody give me some ideas for whole class teaching session and focus group activties please? Thank you!

 

Natasha

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Hi Natasha

What about collecting different packaging, such Toblerone boxes (good excuse to eat some!!), tubes, cereal boxes etc.

The children could bring them in from home.

Linda

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Some ideas!!

Shape feely bags, where the children have to describle the shape they're feeling ie it has a square face.

Go on a shae hunt , be shape detectives!! see where the children can find shapes inside/ outside

Make 3d shapes with palsticine, making 'faces' with pencils on the faces of the shape

repeat 3d solid shape about 100 times every day!!!! :o

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I’ve found this goes down really well with the children. Blutak 4 flat shapes to board (circle, square, triangle, oblong) & draw around them. Name/discuss. Write word ‘flat’. Show children a deflated balloon. Put it between palms & squeeze – it’s ‘flat’. How can we make it ‘fat’? Obvious response – blow it up! Show children the inflated balloon – put between palms – it’s ‘fat’! (Rub out the ‘l’ in flat to change to ‘fat’). We’re going to try to ‘blow up’ the circle. Try…no good. We need something to help us. Now for the ‘magic’. Have a sparkly box/bag. Put the circle inside & have a corresponding sphere the same size & colour already hidden inside box. (I used a yellow circle & sponge PE ball.) What shape do you think it might be when it’s blown up? You need the ‘magic words’. Can the children think of any? Draw the top of the bag together & pretend to blow up the 2D shape inside – children say the magic words & out comes ..….a flat circle!! Oh no – wrong words etc. We’ve had great fun. The anticipation is wonderful. At last you pull out the 3D shape – it’s a ‘fat’ shape. Put it between palms to demonstrate – name it. Repeat with square. I’ve found this is enough in one session. I try to ‘coax’ the triangle to go in the box/bag but he’s nervous – perhaps another day! The children won’t let you forget! We make collections of different 3D shapes; shape walk; roll/slide/both; make models; reassemble boxes that have been opened so they are flat etc. Best of luck!

cant remember who but it was from TES i think last year or so.make sure you have the triangle ready tho cos the children will love it and urge you to go on!! :o

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Andreamay, I love that idea - never come across it before :o

 

My lot enjoy the feely bag game and we sing the song from Tom Thumb Musical Maths.

'Mystery bag, what's inside, what's the shape you try to hide. It's a cube, or cuboid, pyramid or sphere. What is it? we want to hear.' You do need to model the language first, but then the children love being the ones to describe the shape, and you can check up on/correct accurate terms. I always have duplicate shapes visable so that children can see what's being described, and those who can't remember the 3D names can still have a go.

 

We also stick a 3D shape on a child's back and the class have to describe it for the child to guess.

 

Also lots of 3D model making in continuous provision. If you have any of the old maths scheme type pictures of models, they are worth putting out to inspire.

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I've done and activity exploring the properties of different 3D shapes before - we set up a "slope" and children guessed whether the shapes would slide or roll down it, leading onto discussion about flat and curved surfaces - they really liked that and ended up going round the room finding their own shapes to test.

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I tried the flat and fat shapes yesterday and all of my class remembered the difference and could say whether a shape was flat or fat.

We continued to talk about 2 was smaller than 3 so flat shapes were 2D and fat shapes were fatter so 3D.

Today we revised yesterdays work and they still remembered.....

I also tried the magic box today and were amazed at their response! we managed to change the circle and square into corresponding 3D shapes and then had great fun changing them back...... we had to say the magic words backwards.

The triangle wouldn't go in and I heard one of them say "he must be scared he's going to be changed into a fat shape but he mustn't worry cos we'll change him back into a triangle". I feel a post-it coming on!

 

Thank you so much.

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Andreamay, I've done the magic 3D shape activity before, and you're right - they absolutely love it! I first found it on TES last year and can't wait to do it again soon!

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One activity I like to do is a function machine.Large sheet of paper and we draw a machine to sort shapes Shapes solid and flat start in a central set and we draw a path which forks part way down into 2 sets flat/solid rolls/doesn't rolls or whats ever the focus. Children take it in turns to crank the machine and start the shape moving down path. Theres lots of shouts about which set the shape belongs in.

 

Sounds a bit dry written down but usually works well.

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My class all rememeber 'faces' because I drew a bunch of faces with different expressions on pieces of paper and blue tacked them to each face of a cube. We had great fun deciding which faces to move from the cube to the sphere and the cylinder. You'd have thought it was the most hilarious thing they'd ever seen the way they reacted and even those who usually retain very little can still talk about the faces on 3D shapes!

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