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Read, Write Inc


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#1 shasha

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 06:01 AM

We are using Read, Write, Inc with our Foundation 2 classes. The other teacher loves it, but I am finding it dry and boring. How many others out there are using it and if so do you implement it exactly as it is supposed to be delivered (it is quite prescriptive). Also, where do you expect your children to be with this at the end of the year?

Thanks :o

Edited by shasha, 08 March 2009 - 06:01 AM.


#2 blackcat

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 07:30 AM

Hi I am using Read Write in a mix REc/Yr1 class. I sometimes divert and mix the lesson with activities from letters and sounds depending on how the children are responding. Some children are bored with reading speed sounds everytime they read a book but others gain confidence from reading them plus reading the green and red words. I have found the class is dividing into more smaller groups as we progress through the year which is becoming a problem. I try and keep the lessons going at a fast pace. The puppet, magnetic letters and parnter talk are always popular with the children, maybe a few more props would help inject some life into the lessons. Hope this helps.

#3 jmb

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 09:11 AM

Could you explain Read Write please?
Thankyou,

jackie.
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#4 kittycat1279

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 09:51 AM

Read write inc is a phonics programme that also incorporates reading and writing. It was devised by an experienced primary teacher and head, Ruth Miskin. The first set of sounds are taught first which are basically a-z, th, ch, sh, ng and nk (q is taught as qu) there is lots of oral sound blending amongst this and begin to read and make words using magnetic letters. When they are able to sound blend independently they move onto ditties which gets them reading and writing. They practise the sounds for the day, then we look at green and red words, which will basically give them all the words needed to read the ditty. They then read the ditty. All of this is done with their partner, one as teacher one as pupil, then they swap over. There is some other activities linked to comprehension after they have both read the ditty. There is then a sentence that we learn linked to the ditty e.g. a man in a hat. They then try and write it as independently as possible. After this stage they move onto storybooks where there are similar activities and also a writing task related to the story. These activities for the storybooks are spread over 3 days. There is also lots of praise and celebrations - the children are encouraged to use them to praise each other as well. There are also specific assessments to help group the children accurately. We have 5 groups in year R split between 2 teachers, 2 TA and 1 SNA. Year 1 and 2 have mixed groups until the year 2's have reached the stage where they don't need it anymore which is the majority of them by this time of the year. AFter Easter year 2 will be stopping altogether and year R will be joining up with year 1.

The majority of our children really enjoy it and when we don't have sound groups for whatever reason they are really disappointed. I don't think we do anything majorly different to the programme although I must admit I don't always fit everything in so I do have to be flexible. As for where we expect the children to be. I would think that there will be 1 group reviewing the sounds and doing word time, one or two groups at different stages of ditties, one group on green storybooks and one on purple. Our most able children will have been working with the year 1 children and I would expect them to be on pink and orange books.

#5 jmb

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 12:27 PM

Thank you SP61HJ, that sounds like a fun way to do things.
We do letters and sounds, and Jelly and Bean and Oxford reading tree reading books which seems to be going ok. Just a pity they don't all work at the same level, it would make life so much easier :o

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#6 Marion

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 01:41 PM

No I don't like it I think it offers too narrow an experience It does work but so does lots of good phonics programmes a lot cheaper.
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Play, while it cannot change the external realities of childrenís lives, can be a vehicle for children to explore and enjoy their differences and similarities and to create, even for a brief time, a more just world where everyone is an equal and valued participant.

#7 eggwoman

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 06:11 PM

HI

I haven't personally used it but daughter did it in her reception year and i felt that as she went to school knowing her sounds she was kept back almost. She also could read lots of words so to then be told she had to sound everything out threw her a bit and learn some words as tricky words. Like Marion said i think there are better schemes out there. I did not particulary like the reading books or the books they wrote in.

We use the Essex scheme ERP which is ok, i quite liked jolly phonics. I think having a choice is good. I also found that in one school i taught at my children who had been in the nursery had been using letterland some when reaching reception were still saying annie apple etc and were just not getting the sounds so we then used jolly phonics and they started to learn the sounds the EAL children also liked this. As children learn in different ways its interesting to see how these schemes are made up as jolly phonics is a visual and action, letterland is visual with the letter in a shape of a character.




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