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I wonder if anyone can point me in the direction of guidance on school cleaning standards? I have a problem over cleaning in Reception and specifically the cleaning up of bodily fluids!! :ph34r:

 

I've spent hours Googling 'cleaning up vomit in schools' expecting there to be some guidance but have found nothing! Our caretaker's idea of what's acceptable and mine are poles apart! :huh:

 

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Thankz! I had seen that. Seems really odd there are no official guides! On First Aid training we were advised to use the powder you sprinkle on to neutralise but the caretaker objects!

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On 01/02/2017 at 21:39, FlibbleJibblet said:

This may help, but ultimately it's not compulsory. I only found this by googling, so have no real knowledge on if there is actual legal guidelines. I'd be surprised if not though.

https://www.teachers.org.uk/files/hygiene-control-in-schools.doc

This is interesting, although I am a bit confused. As I understand HIV is not only transmitted by these 2 ways that the mention, but also through infested needles. What am I missing? “HIV and AIDS can only be transmitted by the introduction of infected blood or blood products into the bloodstream, through sexual intercourse, and from a mother to her baby either during pregnancy or by breast feeding.”

Another point: “Encourage use of handkerchiefs when coughing and sneezing.”. We do not encourage this as children (and I have seen adults) just smear their snoots around their faces and hands and keep reusing the same handkerchief over and over throughout the day, spreading germs even more. Ours use tissues, folded appropriately, dispose them and wash their hands afterwards. We encourage them to cough/sneeze near their elbows.

Wow! What if it was a lot?! “Don’t use mops to clean up blood and body fluid spillages.  Use paper towels instead.”

I am happy with these measures. I just wonder how do schools expect us to do all this, especially when there is only one practitioner in the classroom and not warm water in the area (only in the kitchen in the Secondary building) .🙄

 

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your EHO should be able to give advice about this. Most 'institutions' have a fluids pack with a special powder that is sprinkled on and soaks up the liquid making it easier to remove and less likely to spread. PPE comes under health and safety (responsibility of health and safety officer of the school) there is a duty to protect the staff and the workers ...the legislation you are looking for should be under that …(I have info at work) .There is a duty of care to ensure the worker (in this case the cleaner) is protected from harm and is trained to handle this situation so I would use this as the 'lever' to get it sortedxD is he employed direct or through an agency?

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18 minutes ago, finleysmaid said:

your EHO should be able to give advice about this. Most 'institutions' have a fluids pack with a special powder that is sprinkled on and soaks up the liquid making it easier to remove and less likely to spread. PPE comes under health and safety (responsibility of health and safety officer of the school) there is a duty to protect the staff and the workers ...the legislation you are looking for should be under that …(I have info at work) .There is a duty of care to ensure the worker (in this case the cleaner) is protected from harm and is trained to handle this situation so I would use this as the 'lever' to get it sortedxD is he employed direct or through an agency?

We are not a school in the UK, but we do use the EYFS. 😉 Anyway, I am surely going to share the information.👍🏼

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