Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
What's New
Articles
Resources
About Us
Tapestry
Clarrie

Sarah Teather Men In Early Years

Recommended Posts

I have just read the article in Nursery World 14-27 June 2011 regarding the EYPS.

 

At the National Day Nursery Association’s Annual Conference, Ms Sarah Teather, who is the Early Years Minister said “the status (EYPS) could be raised if a few more men were involved”.

 

Do others find this remark offensive and insulting to the women who work in the Early Years profession. Saying that the profession is need of more men on board so that the women in their jobs can get the pay, conditions and status that they deserve!!!

 

I have been a inner city preschool Leader and SENCO for 8 years now, I have no pension, no sick pay, I am on minimum wage, no overtime or big BONUSES, I do the same work as an FSB Nursery Nurse in a school.

 

I am studying for the EYPS, with the Open University, and the study has been rewarding not only for myself but for my setting, parents and the agencies I work alongside. At the moment, I am not too sure as to whether I can continue due to the funding cuts.

 

Her comments do not do nothing for the status of the EYPS, saying that women, like myself who have studied hard and Ms Teather seems to be dumbing the EYPS qualification down as there are few men in childcare.

 

To say that because I am a woman, in early years, I am less valuable than a man would be in my job is insulting. The main ethos of the EYFS is inclusion and by saying this we are throwing sexual equality out of the window.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bless you - we have been disscussing on the EYP forum and Steve did find link that showed her comments in a different light - i just dont know whats going to happen as the rest of you i'm sure - very uncertain times!!!! :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If she wants an increase in status, with or without more men, then she needs to fund the sector to allow salaries to reflect the eperience, skills and qualifications that we have.

 

Paying for the Early Years Entitlment at less than market rates, and by forbidding settings to pass the diffference on to parents, is not helping. They should be funding at above market rates to get quality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As my LA isn't as forward thinking as others could Steve possibly post the link you mention here too? I've been frantically looking for more context before I started to blow my top about these comments, as. like Clarrie, I felt outraged at the context in which the comments were reported in NW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks hali!

 

Not sure it answers the questions of why having men in early years would automatically make us all of higher status but interesting to read the fuller report. I am in agreement that the whole area of training should be looked at and reviewed - just not sure my review would come out with the same answers as the government's! And I sincerely hope that the status of EYPS comes out favourably, otherwise I will be very miffed! I also worry that making such a comment now might affect recruitment to the EYPS in Sept/Jan. Many of my FdA students are already disillusioned and questioning the value of carrying on to EYPS. As their tutor I am trying to encourage them as I think it helps them to continue their reflective journey, but I can't argue with their argument that it won't really get them anywhere in terms of income or career - especially when I'm no longer in practice now!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree -its very hard to keep our mentees motivated at the present espaecially as in my area we are having to tender for another uni! Feel sorry for future eyps and my job!!!!

 

just have to hope if Cons want graduate leaders then they will work a way out to keep EYPs going - but feel that with current EYPs some sort of upskilling/monitoring needs o happen! :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
but feel that with current EYPs some sort of upskilling/monitoring needs o happen!

 

Lol! Definitely agree with you there! A colleague and I are thinking of taking over the world to right such wrongs - would you like to join us?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was so cross, swore and said I would like to give that young lady a piece of my mind. I don't think I was over-reacting do you?

 

I then forwarded the CYP link to the programme director for EYPS at my local uni, her reply was "oh dear" - rather limp and feeble I thought but I guess she doesn't want to bite the hand that feeds her. I also sent it to our LA bod responsible for workforce development who has suggested we use it as the focus for our next EYP network meeting (in two weeks time) and put together a collective response to Miss Teather - so it will be a colllective piece of my mind mixed with some others then!! Still don't think I am over-reacting at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was so cross, swore and said I would like to give that young lady a piece of my mind. I don't think I was over-reacting do you?

 

I then forwarded the CYP link to the programme director for EYPS at my local uni, her reply was "oh dear" - rather limp and feeble I thought but I guess she doesn't want to bite the hand that feeds her. I also sent it to our LA bod responsible for workforce development who has suggested we use it as the focus for our next EYP network meeting (in two weeks time) and put together a collective response to Miss Teather - so it will be a colllective piece of my mind mixed with some others then!! Still don't think I am over-reacting at all.

 

 

I am with you all the way BMG, to the point of turning up in any meeting with a moustache, changing my name to Bob and smoking a pipe!!

 

These comments have made me sit and wonder what is the point at all in Early Years, and should I just give up, Ms Teather comments, women are never going to get anywhere in the world.

 

I really do think Ms Teather should back up her comments and explain further to us 'mere' women what she meant. :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lol! Definitely agree with you there! A colleague and I are thinking of taking over the world to right such wrongs - would you like to join us?

 

YES! I am on a mission now to get Ms Teather to justify her statement. This has really made me angry, upset and also belittles everything I have achieved over my 10year+ in early years.

 

Lets do it girls!!! Lets take over Early Years and show Ms Teather what we are made off!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have emailed her - but sadly as others have not had a reply xD:(:o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Facebook users could go to the Department for Education's page and comment there - emails to the Minister are great, but no-one knows who has emailed or what the reply is (although obviously we'll share here!) but maybe lots of EYPs and practitioners (male or female) commenting publicly on their page will make 'them' stand up and take note!

 

I haven't had a reply to my email either, except for one from her constituency office saying that they have passed it onto the Ministerial team for them to deal with. Please don't hold your breath whilst waiting for a reply! :o

 

I've just read all that back and it seems to me that I'm turning into a right old moaning minnie! Must be my age!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a man, I have to say that I do agree with you all. My view is that the pay and status problems are not gender issues. In my humble opinion, they are more to do with how we as a nation (under)value the Early Years sector. It is difficult to understand quite what Sarah Teather was getting at with this speech. The longitudinal study on EYPS provides evidence of both improvements in quality generally and in practitioners' sense of self-worth. It has undoubtedly provided a "status" for those attaining it. Unfortunately, not everyone recognises this, including the job market. I'm not sure anyone was aware that EYPS was set up just to try and attract more men into our profession! The workforce gender imbalance is a far more complex situation which continues to be addressed by those of us with an interest in this area. I do hope that EYPS can be built on rather than rejected by some other initiative otherwise I fear it might be 1 step forward and 2 back.

Edited by DavidW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I got a reply to my email. Not exactly sure it isn't "politician-ese" but I'll copy it here for you to consider:

 

Thank you for your email of 16th June about the comments which the Minister of State for Children and Families – Sarah Teather made at the NDNA conference on 9th June. As you can imagine the Minister receives a lot of correspondence and your letter has been passed to me for reply as this team is responsible for the Government’s position in relation to the Early Years Professional Status (EYPS) programme.

 

Firstly, can I assure you that the comments that the Minister of State made at the NDNA conference were in no sense intended to undervalue those who already work in the sector. They were instead an attempt to highlight that some people do not yet give working in the early years the kudos, respect and recognition it deserves.

 

Whilst one of the Governments priorities identified in the document ‘The Coalition: our programme for Government’ is that it wants to see a greater gender balance in the early education and childcare workforce, the Government are however serious about wanting to raise the status of the early years and all those who work in it – regardless of their gender.

 

Indeed, the Government and the sector share an ambition for a high quality, graduate-led, highly-skilled workforce that delivers excellent learning adapted to the development needs of each individual child regardless of gender. That is why we are continuing to invest in and encourage the development of the early education and childcare workforce, for example by providing the Children’s Workforce Development Council with funding for the EYPS and New Leaders in Early Years programmes in 2011-12.

 

In addition to funding being provided at the national level, the Government is freeing local authorities (LAs) to focus on essential frontline services, and to invest through the Early Intervention Grant (EIG) in early intervention and prevention in order to produce long-term savings and better results for children, young people and families.

 

The EIG brings together funding for Sure Start, early years, youth and family support. We are not dictating how local authorities should use this funding but are encouraging them to recognise the strong evidence for investing in a high-quality workforce when making funding decisions. From the early years workforce perspective, this may include: using money to increase and sustain the number of graduates in the local area; providing other types of pedagogical training for staff; and possibly making investment in other qualifications. We trust local authorities to make the right decisions for their local communities.

 

It is in this context that the Government is reviewing the EYPS. The EYPS is not yet fully recognised as a professional equivalent to teaching. We have, therefore, asked the CWDC to review the standards, focused on two key things: how the standards support the concept of teaching in early years – leading the way in terms of children being ready for school; and how the EYPS standards link with spreading leadership practice.

 

I hope this is helpful.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Barry Warwick

Quality and Standards Division

barry.warwick@education.gsi.gov.uk

www.education.gov.uk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow lucky you xD interesting can't wait to how how threy review the standards :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me neither. For a variety of reasons I've recently been looking at the NQT standards and the first thought through my head was "haven't I read these somewhere before" as they are very similar to the EYPS standards. It also strikes me as bad timing given that the training providers are currently tendering for providing EYPS training from Jan 2012 - doesn't leave much time for a considered review, or do they plan to change it all again after that, and what about us poor souls who already have the status - will we have to do something else to keep it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well I got a reply to my email. Not exactly sure it isn't "politician-ese" but I'll copy it here for you to consider:

Well isn't this funny? I got a reply, exactly the same as yours. However I also had an extra bit on the bottom:-

 

Finally, you say that you will have to close your nursery at the end of July because, in part, of the funding for school nurseries. The Government is committed to supporting the provision of free nursery education for pre-school children, and to that support being offered by a diverse range of providers, including school nurseries. The Government announced in the Spending Review that it had protected funding for all three and four year olds to continue to receive 15 hours of free early education per week.

 

The Government is taking action to address provider concerns by improving the fairness and transparency of funding for early education. As of April this year, we have required all local authorities to have an early years single funding formula in place. Whilst the formula will not mean that all settings will get the same amount, it will mean that all local authorities set clear and consistent funding rates based on a proper analysis of the true cost of provision. We are also considering how to improve how early education funding operates, including seeking views from the sector as part of the consultation on School Funding Reform.

 

Not very helpful really. What do we do next? :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will be pleased to know that I have a very, very similar reply to my email from Barry... do they think we were born yesterday???

 

Dear Ms Hare,

 

Thank you for your email of 15th June about the comments which the Minister of State for Children and Families – Sarah Teather made at the NDNA conference on 9th June. As you can imagine the Minister receives a lot of correspondence and your letter has been passed to me for reply as this team is responsible for the Government’s position in relation to the Early Years Professional Status (EYPS) programme.

 

Firstly, can I assure you that the comments that the Minister of State made at the NDNA conference were in no sense intended to undervalue those who already work in the sector. They were instead an attempt to highlight that some people do not yet give working in the early years the kudos, respect and recognition it deserves.

 

Whilst one of the Governments priorities identified in the document ‘The Coalition: our programme for Government’ is that it wants to see a greater gender balance in the early education and childcare workforce, the Government are however serious about wanting to raise the status of the early years and all those who work in it – regardless of their gender.

 

Indeed, the Government and the sector share an ambition for a high quality, graduate-led, highly-skilled workforce that delivers excellent learning adapted to the development needs of each individual child regardless of gender. That is why we are continuing to invest in and encourage the development of the early education and childcare workforce, for example by providing the Children’s Workforce Development Council with funding for the EYPS and New Leaders in Early Years programmes in 2011-12.

 

In addition to funding being provided at the national level, the Government is freeing local authorities (LAs) to focus on essential frontline services, and to invest through the Early Intervention Grant (EIG) in early intervention and prevention in order to produce long-term savings and better results for children, young people and families.

 

The EIG brings together funding for Sure Start, early years, youth and family support. We are not dictating how local authorities should use this funding but are encouraging them to recognise the strong evidence for investing in a high-quality workforce when making funding decisions. From the early years workforce perspective, this may include: using money to increase and sustain the number of graduates in the local area; providing other types of pedagogical training for staff; and possibly making investment in other qualifications. We trust local authorities to make the right decisions for their local communities.

 

It is in this context that the Government is reviewing the EYPS. The EYPS is not yet fully recognised as a professional equivalent to teaching. We have, therefore, asked the CWDC to review the standards, focused on two key things: how the standards support the concept of teaching in early years – leading the way in terms of children being ready for school; and how the EYPS standards link with spreading leadership practice.

 

I hope this is helpful.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Barry Warwick

Quality and Standards Division

barry.warwick@education.gsi.gov.uk

www.education.gov.uk

 

Your correspondence has been allocated the reference number 2011/0043257.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So we aren't being treated like a "unique child" then!

Well I suppose I could say I was - he did refer to the personal circumstances I had raised in my email. I shall be writing my reply, when I have recouped my brain cells!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And when I do reply, I shall make reference to his standard reply...!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And if you havent already done it, there's a petition to sign too.

The link is on the home page or here

So far there are 620 signatures :o

Edited by Rea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just feel very deflated... I spent ages trying to get the wording right to Ms Teathers, and then Barry just sends a 'round robin' email back!

 

The OU Tutors who started the petition have sent it to her with a covering letter, will be interesting to see if they get Barry's standard reply.

 

:o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wondered if Barry was the only way through to Ms Teather so I googled and found this

 

Sarah Teather MP

Liberal Democrat Member of Parliament for Brent Central

1 High Road,

Willesden Green,

LONDON NW10 2TE

teathers@parliament.uk

020 8459 0455 (landline)

020 8830 3280 (fax)

 

Frances Inglis (Policy and research)

Email Frances at: frances.inglis@parliament.uk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Initially I emailed Ms Teather through her parliamentary office but I got a reply saying that since it wasn't a constituency matter they were passing it through to her Ministerial office.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I wondered if Barry was the only way through to Ms Teather so I googled and found this

 

Sarah Teather MP

Liberal Democrat Member of Parliament for Brent Central

1 High Road,

Willesden Green,

LONDON NW10 2TE

teathers@parliament.uk

020 8459 0455 (landline)

020 8830 3280 (fax)

 

Frances Inglis (Policy and research)

Email Frances at: frances.inglis@parliament.uk

 

 

The email address is the one that I sent my original email to.. However, I did send an email to my MP Jon Ashworth, with the petition and also how the article made me and other early years workers feel. I got a letter back (on house of commons letter head), saying that he has written to Ms Teathers and is awaiting her reply which he will send to me.

 

He will probably get the same reply from Barry!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe we should all send a complaint to our own MP. It might not lead anywhere but it'd make them ask her questions!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×