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Travelling Fellowship: Research study in New Zealand and Germany

EYFS Reception Training

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#91 WChurchill

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Posted 16 August 2016 - 01:11 PM

I drove today to a girls secondary school in Tauranga  to watch a Babywatching class with 17 and 18 year olds. This was a long-standing appointment for me and really exceeded my expectations.

 

The girls were in their final year of school and this was an early childhood education class, nz year 13.  Typical of BW, a mum (Megan) and her little boy (Te Arahi a Maori name which means to guide) come into class every week for one session.  Te Arahi is now 5 months old so is quite accustomed to visiting the class. My host Tanzi (who was also the facilitator) explained how the girls were now more confident during the sessions.

 

I found it interesting how the course is modified but still focuses on attachment between the mother and baby but also the girls were learning about child development too. This was clearly going to benefit any of the girls going into relevant careers but also these girls might too soon be mums themselves. The girls go into settings as part of their course and they have a much better understanding of attachment, which is so crucial in the child’s emotional health and development. During the session the toys/blankets etc. that children were attached to was discussed and how each child needs a sense of safety.  This was a very interesting discussion to me as it was reiterated how if children do not feel safe then they will not learn! In our pressurised pre-schools and schools I think this can sometimes be forgotten or drop to the bottom of the list of priorities. I know of refugees who have arrived at school who are straight into the classroom but the teacher is obligated to teach the pre-planned lesson.  There may be support outside the classroom but the teacher is the teacher!  That is so sad.

 

Te Arahi was quite happy to be held by the girls but then lay on the mat to begin the session.  He was playing with toys that the girls had made in class. The notion of meeting his needs came up a number of times in the session and how are needs known and met. How does mum know what      Te Arahi is thinking/needs?  How does he/she feel etc.  Secure attachment was also a common point of focus. ‘If he doesn’t feel safe then he doesn’t explore.’ 

 

Finance of the course was discussed and I think it is a remarkably low cost and very easily affordable by schools.  It is far less than other programmes that I have heard of and sustainable which is very important when embarking on a new project.

 

I was excited about this class and I know there will be such ‘A level’ or diploma courses at home.  I think that BW was ideal here as it has a dual role of developing empathy whilst also general child development which clearly would benefit future practitioners and future mums. It is such a cheap but effective session/course to run and I am motivated to be going on this when back in England but will focus on reception classes first. Anybody interested in the North West then please do get in touch!

The class teacher gave me a graph which records the real progress that the students have made in their knowledge and understanding of attachment. This is always useful for  those of us that like firm quantifiable evidence to support  discussions. Fantastic to see how the learning is done in such a meaningful, interesting and engaging way.

When we finished the session, we had a good chat and it transpires that Megan had worked in England as a school teacher in Reception classes. She told me how formal she found it and that she had worked with a Samoan teacher who would sing maths songs to the children and the outcomes soared. My kind of teaching I thought.

 

One of the students joined us for our casual chat and she said of the sessions ‘It’s awesome being in the childhood class, to know what is happening in that moment….You can see where the love is directed to.’ Great grounding an understanding of young babies needs I thought.

Our discussion took us to Steiner schools where children enter formal education at 7. The children will be on the site of the school in separate provision from 5 but it is run more like a kindergarten. I would really like to know more about these schools and will look into it at home.  I wonder where the closest to me is in the NW? I shall be searching for some research papers here. Or a study to be done? Again in the discussions it became apparent that schools do have different policies and practices which is something that I do like to see as they are self-determined and democratic which is clearly then responsive to local need.

 

 I was chatting about what I had seen in NZ and the teaching ratios.  I was surprised to hear that some pre-schools do abide by the 1:5 ratios for under twos.  The children I believe cannot have their basic physical and social needs met with this ratio. Private fee paying settings are prevalent just as at home and it is not uncommon to have big chains that are clearly business. I do believe that a service that is a public good and necessity can struggle with the financial pressures and providing the best environment for children, parents and staff.  Those of you who are privately run will have more insight than I have here but it is such a shame that decisions of such great importance are severely affected by financing. I do not know a lot about funding at home and did here once that there is a cap on how much you can charge.  It would be great if one of you could enlighten me in you free time!!!!!!

Our discussion led us to Play Centres, which I am hearing more and more about through chatting to staff at the university.  I am hoping to visit this setting, which is run by parent volunteers.  Sounds a little bit like tots groups but with extensive provision. I am keen to know how they are run and financed.

 

I have attached some photos.  There is a photo on one girl who has simulated suit on so she looks and to some extent feels pregnant.  It was very realistic!

 

For me the big lesson today was the importance of attachment and empathy.  My last conversation with Tanzi was about how this is imperative to underpin all learning and without it such things as self-regulation/self-control will not come into being.  This is the foundation that we as practitioners are able to facilitate!   It’s so important.   We can make a difference to these children’s life chances. Let’s do it!

 

A huge thank you to all and the class teacher who was so generous with her time and information.

 

 

 

 

 

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#92 mrseahorse54

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Posted 16 August 2016 - 03:16 PM

This sounds amazing. I will talk about it with colleagues in September. Very very interesting. As we know attachment is key to future happiness, success, learning, relationships and practically everything. Great possibilities I think. As you say in your post school is not yet able to address needs as they arise. A child will mention something quite upsetting in the middle of phonics and you just have to carry on. Obviously not what that child needs at that moment. I look forward to hearing more.
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#93 WChurchill

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 03:45 AM

Definitely Mrseahorse54. My daughter came home once with her PE kit as it was to be washed at the end f every half term. She hadn't even worn it as she told me they did science instead. The teacher I felt was under pressure to get good scores. I have felt at times that if I asked an assessment coordinator straight would they like me to work on the emotional development of a child or get higher levels, I felt the higher levels were more important. I would like to discuss why that would be???

#94 WChurchill

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 03:46 AM

Today I had a good discussion regarding the content of the teacher-training programme at the polytechnic, which is interesting for me as I work as a tutor in initial teacher education.

Our discussion began yesterday really, when I was outlining some of my findings. Interestingly there have been ERO reports published that highlight there key findings of which they have focused upon for the year. I have downloaded the maths one, which I am keen to read. These publications I feel are very useful as the inspectors will have visited a huge number of settings over the year. Interestingly one report highlighted that only 10% of settings were providing very well for infants and toddlers with reference to the strands and principles. Toddlers communication and exploring were not well addressed it was felt. I have not read this report yet but I would be keen to learn more about this observation and wonder if it is related to teacher knowledge and also hindering the young child’s natural inclination to explore. Toddlers have very sophisticated communication strategies and I wonder if this are misunderstood and/or not maximised to best effect. We discussed if mat time might be overused in some settings. Also, some settings were not taking the child’s lead and building on their interests and some one to one time was not often evident. Significantly, I feel that I have been to outstanding settings but it is understood that practice does vary considerably. The literacy ERO report, which again is on my list to read, was followed by examples of best practice literacy which was followed by exemplars of good practice. I will be keen to see how similar this would be to exemplification material in England. Here I always tend to ask how close are the exemplification material to common practice in settings particularly given the current status of Development Matters.

There is a clear Maori element to the course. This is very strong and continually being developed. We discussed the longevity of the TW document and I felt its success could be due in large part to the wide consultation process before publication in 1996. Academics, Maori, Pacifika, Pakeha were all involved. The current review will not be looking at changes to the principles and strands. It is thought that there may be more clarity on how to implement TW and this may include more focus on the current outcomes.
TW, ‘the mat for all to stand on’ is seen to be a very aspirational and philosophical document. The learning objectives are very broad. There is little or nothing in TW about how to assess.
Margaret Carr (learning stories) led a to ‘Kei Tua o te Pae’ which gives exemplars to learning stories. There are 19 in the series with book one a good introduction! Learning stories had different relevance in the various settings that I visited. I believe the initial purpose was for the benefit of each child and parent. Good learning stories we discussed describe what is happening. The focus is to record learning and then do something about what has been learnt. This could be sharing with parents and hence making connections with home. This can support parents understanding and may be a support for them.
On discussion of the curriculum, I was interested in the finer details of how each subject was taught on the course. When discussing literacy there seems to be a very structured programme of how the students are taught very early reading and communication. I wondered how much this is done at home on our early childhood and indeed primary courses. The students on this course do a block on how are babies/toddlers and infants communicating. Much of the assessments are practically based with the students carefully observing children on practicum. Theory is also taught. Interestingly, Bronfenbrenner is the only theorists overtly mentioned in TW.

Our discussion included about curriculum areas and with some inevitability moved to how children are competent learners and ‘ready for school.’ This would mean having good language skills amongst other skills and knowledge needed for life in general so deserve focus for this alone. It is how they are delivered I feel is key. Students are taught assessments on the course here but this is for the students learning so that they can better understand a child’s development rather than for reporting purposes. Running records are to inform the teacher rather than target driven. One assessment of the students would be reading in Maori or record six ways that a baby has communicated. I must find out if this is on our teacher training courses. Perhaps one of you could enlighten me.

We discussed the project approach that I have seen in many settings. It was explained to me that children will often come to a teacher if they are very engaged in a topic and ask to learn the skills they need to progress. For example, they begin to measure when they want to know how much wood is needed or they may ask how do I write this? I have never been a big fan of predetermined topics and now I have a little rationale!

Dispositions were a common discussion point this morning. I noticed in settings that there were a huge variety in terms of the number of dispositions focused on. Margaret Carr in her work mentions 5 I understand. When observing children it is useful to see what is transferable to other areas. Not just the skills then but ‘habits of mind.’

Is it fair to say a balance is needed? Thoughts please.

#95 gillpen

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 06:43 AM

What a fascinating journey you are on! It is such a wonderful opportunity to experience and explore the differing ways of educating and caring for children. We read about approaches like 'Te Whariki' but to be able to get hands on experience is just wonderful.

 

It was interesting to hear about the different inspection procedure too. It sounds like a much more positive process than the one we have in place! Looking forward to seeing more NZ photos  :1b


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#96 LKeyteach

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 09:48 AM

Thank you for posting
It is so interesting to hear how it all works in other parts of the world.
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#97 WChurchill

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 11:14 PM

I had time today to meet and discuss how maths teaching is taught on the programme at the Polytechnic. I was really looking forward to this, as this was not a focus in any of the settings that I had visited.

We began our discussion of the beginning of the week where I briefly outlined my observations of the low overt status to maths teaching. Interestingly it was repeated that the ERO report has reiterated this too.

To be effective you need to understand what early maths looks like? A good mathematician is not necessarily a good maths teacher. It was discussed that the Big idea needs to be understood before the skills. This was explained to me with the example of teaching addition having the bigger concept of classification. I think I need a little more discussion on this as it sounded very interesting but is new to me! I was interested to discuss babies exploration of space is thinking mathematically too.

On the course, the students are introduced to equipment that they may see in the centres that they train in. The potential of the equipment and the mathematical language is focused upon. It was felt that mathematical opportunities and understanding was not being used to best effect currently in settings. Perhaps looking with mathematical lenses might alter this in some way.

The cultural context of mathematics and the western privileging of knowledge was fascinating I thought. We do tend to think of mathematics as fixed! It will be interesting tomorrow when I go briefly to a Maori immersed setting to see what differences if any are there.

There is a discussion at the beginning of the course about students attitudes to maths and what they think that maths is. What do children know about maths? How do we use maths? How do we mathematise it? The understanding of practitioners in settings was discussed with the possibility of mathematical knowledge and opportunities not being developed and maximised.

I found this a very useful conversation and something that I will ponder upon. It would be really usefully and interesting to hear others opinions.

#98 mrseahorse54

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 12:33 PM

I agree completely. The understanding of mathematics is very narrow and has lead to many students developing a very early fixed mindset about their own capacity to become competent mathematicians. There is a heavy emphasis on number for instance. Teaching sessions are often dull, static and lack movement, actions or song. We need to address this. Shouting out times tables is not the be all and end all. This is something I feel strongly about as I see very young children describing themselves as no good at maths. Let's take the fear away and begin to illustrate through are daily practice that maths is everywhere and we are doing it all the time. Let's make it possible for children to explore and investigate this area. I totally agree that mathematicians don't always make the best teachers. Subject knowledge is critical, obviously, but understanding how children best learn, listening to them, observing them and sensitively supporting them is equally if not more important.

#99 WChurchill

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 10:46 AM

I cannot overestimate how pleased I was today to have a discussion with a leading educator in neuroscience. We ‘were both rowing the same way’ it transpired. We talked about how useful this knowledge is for all people working with children in any capacity.

I learnt that neuroscience does not have to be taught in New Zealand on teacher education programmes and it is very much hit and miss as to when and how it is taught. There have been some discussions with the New Zealand government to legislate for this. I would like to investigate if neuroscience is taught in England on programmes for any practitioners working or training to work with young children.

My knowledge of brain development is slightly above non-existent but I would dearly love to know more. I have been recommended the book ‘The Boy Who Was Raised As a Dog and other stories from a child psychiatrist’s notebook’ by Bruce D Perry. If any of you have read it then please fill me in. I am aware that brain development up to three years old is taught on some courses and this is a very good start. Do you think this should extend to neuroscience generally?

Any thoughts would be much appreciated.

I have had a change of location and the internet is hit and miss. I will post when I can as I have a number of settings that I have not shared with you all.

Edited by WChurchill, 25 August 2016 - 10:48 AM.


#100 mrseahorse54

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 12:46 PM

Like you my real knowledge is limited so I will be getting that book. Thanks for that. Gut feeling, it has to be critically important that we become better informed. Guy Claxtons work is very interesting. I look forwsrd to hearing more.

#101 WChurchill

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 01:48 AM

Thanks for the feedback. This is helpful as I fofind that it is very low on the agenda. Professionals that I talk to will often say that they hadn't thought of it. Could you tell me a little more about the author you mentioned please.

#102 WChurchill

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 12:29 PM

Hi all

Kia ora all

Sorry that I have not checked in for a while but travelling back and getting into the swing of things
back in the UK has taken its toll.

I am posting a link a kapa haka practice in a school in Christchurch. I just love all the actions.



https://1drv.ms/v/s!...14rJShLSFclHGVW

I still have a few visits that I want to share with you and will do that shortly.

I hope you enjoy the Maori singing as much as I did .
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#103 mrseahorse54

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 07:48 PM

Guy Claxton talks about building learning power. He is very interesting to listen to and there are loads of his talks on YouTube. His book Hare Brain Tortoise mind is fascinating.

#104 WChurchill

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Posted 07 September 2016 - 12:43 PM

OOh mrseahorse54. This looks fab. Thank you very much.


As part of my fellowship, I have written a blog post for the world famous Christie hospital in Manchester where I was treated for advanced cancer five years ago. The aim for this is to inspire others who may also be affected by the disease.

To access the blog then click the link below.

http://christie.nhs....-christie-blog/

#105 Rebecca

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Posted 04 November 2016 - 04:27 PM

Te Kohonga Reo

 

I have been back in Manchester since the end of August and the day-to-day reality has taken over.  I have been busy catching up with work and have written a couple of blogs/articles about my fellowship.  I have also done some presentations, which collectively has meant that I have not relayed to you some fascinating aspects of my learning journey.  I hope to rectify this over the next couple of weeks.

In a previous blog, I discussed my visit to a bi-cultural preschool based in Northland. I did however, struggle to get to visit a fully immersed, Maori preschool (Kohonga Reo), on my travels.  I felt that they were very private and came to understand that a personal introduction was the only way to be invited to visit them. I was most fortunate then to be introduced to a lecturer at the Bay of Plenty Polytechnic who had very close ties with Rotokawa preschool.  I spent a very interesting morning with her and learnt a little of the culture, history and complexities of  Kohanga Reo.

 

WChurchill%20image%201.JPG

The only language spoken in front of the tamariki (children) is Te Reo and the principle aim is to use and retain the Maori language.  This is done in a Whanau (family) setting with support of iwi (tribes) and Hapu (descent groups). Parents are encouraged to learn the language too and to speak it at home.  Kaupapa (Maori principles) must also be observed and tamariki are to go to total immersion classes once they leave the Kohanga.

A young boy who formally welcomed me took me into the setting. He made a speech (whaikorero) and which was preparation for his role in the future. I observed Morning Prayer when all staff and children were together on the carpet. Girls sat with me in the principle of manaakitanga, which was to make me feel welcome and show that they were caring for me.    I observed karakia (community times), for example singing and eating together which are considered very important. I was informed that ‘…all Maori have karakia’.

WChurchill%20image%202.JPG

 

I was thrilled to be given time to learn about  Kohanga Reo and the history and position it has in early childhood settings in New Zealand. I chatted to Leah the licensee of the kohanga who has long been involved in the development of  Kohanga Reo.   I learnt that they came into being due to the elders (Kaumatua) meeting across New Zealand in the 1970s and students demanding more Te Reo.  Historically, missionaries who taught the children did not care which language the children spoke as long as they were learning about God.  This contrasted with government policy of only speaking English and Leah told me of her mother getting ‘the stick’ for speaking Maori. Catastrophically, a survey in 1975 highlighted that the native language was on the brink of extinction. Hui of Whakatau was held in Wellington to develop a strategy to save the language and one year later, without government funding the first Kohanga Reo was established. I learned of, admired and was inspired   once again by the  great determination of  whanau and elders of the indigenous population.  Their drive to set up the kohanga Reo and how ‘..it started out of nothing’ is phenomenal.

Books were evident in the setting.  I learnt that reading is commonplace but the emphasis would be on whanau and reading together. Maori story telling is a huge part of the pedagogy with connections being made between identity and culture. The curriculum appeared in some way to relate back to Kaupapa (Maori Principles). Contribution to the community is central, as is the notion that one has to give back to the Maori community.

I learnt of the complexities of perusing Maori culture and tradition.  Funding of the Kohanga Reo is less than mainstream. One point of contention is the fact that to achieve full funding there must be trained staff to a requisite level whereby the Maori culture has a very strong link with Whanau (family). There are qualifications but the authorities do not recognise some of them and therefore  funding is affected. It was suggested however, that this does  give the Kohanga a level of autonomy.  Here it could be argued that the Education Review Office (ERO) have ‘mainstream thinking’. A further struggle was setting up the Kohanga Reo was having kaumatua (elders) involvement which is seen as central to Maori culture.  What is problematic is that this generation do not have Te Reo due to past governments actively discouraging the language.  Significantly, the success of the Kohanga Reo led to the kura kaupapa Māori (Māori-language immersion schools). In this setting, many of the children will stay until they are six years old, which differs from mainstream schools.  They also socialise out of school and it was described as not being a ‘nine to three setting’. It is abundantly clear the community cohesion of which the kohanga  either drives or at the very least is tied to.

I had a number of discussions about learning stories on my travels in New Zealand. During this particular interchange, it arose that the purpose of learning stories in the setting were to satisfy ERO.  The feeling was that they were more appropriate and useful for mainstream settings.    Te Whatupokeka, which gives guidance on how to write learning stories, was recommended for me to read     I was also signposted to Purakau, oral storytelling and the centrality of this in Maori culture.

Other principles were discussed that would be very interesting to follow up. Accountability to whanau, iwi and Maoridom was touched upon and accountability to central government. Another key principle evident in policies was the wellbeing of the iwi, spiritually and emotionally and this I think would be fascinating to pursue in relation to the pressurized western culture we find ourselves in today.

The sheer determination and passion of the people that I met that day was evident.  It was no surprise to me to be told of the two huge government accolades that Rotokawa Kohanga received, despite operating in a predominantly mainstream western culture.

WChurchill%20image%203.JPG

 

On the last day of my travels, I was being interviewed by a member the university PR team.  By chance she told me about Puna Reo settings that are Maori immersed but are funded and supported by the Ministry of Education. This differs to the Kohanga Reo setting is chartered through Te Kohanga Reo National Trust. I read a little about Gate Pa School in Tauranga, which has opened up a Puna Reo.  I think if I were to come to NZ again, I would definitely look up similar settings and would spend more time in Tauranga.   This chance visit was far too short but  did serve to further my understanding of the complexities for Maori preschool education in New Zealand.  A complexity that would be well worth exploring further.


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#106 WChurchill

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 11:01 PM

Attached File  IMG_0470.JPG   198.85KB   0 downloadsAttached File  IMG_0520.JPG   61.62KB   0 downloadsAttached File  IMG_0508.JPG   117.64KB   0 downloadsTots Corner

‘Listen with your eyes’

I had the huge honour and pleasure to meet Loraine, the owner/manager at Tots Corner in Auckland. The setting is privately owned and costs over $800,000 a year to run. This is funded half form parents and half from the government.  Elaine told me that the under twos receive funding which is separate to over twos funding. She has a huge amount of experience in the work of Reggio Emilia and has travelled extensively in her work.  Her preschool was just stunning, very impressive in true Reggio style and philosophy. I do not think the photographs that I took did it justice.  

The setting is registered for thirty-seven children and can have ten children under two but there is usually just six children in this age bracket.  The children aged six months to two years are in the nest and then they transfer, when appropriate to the mixed space with two to three and a half year olds. There are ten staff and all have degrees which is well above statutory requirements. This led to a discussion that I have had in previous settings regarding the aspirations of the former labour government to ensure that all staff have degrees. The current government leans to the right and lowered the qualification levels for staff working in preschools. Only one member of staff is full-time.  The setting is open from 7.30am until 5.30pm and there is a full staff meeting once a month from 5.30pm to 7.30pm.

Each room reflects the teacher’s own methods with routines being decided on a room to room basis.  The older children have a rolling programme for snack whereas the younger children eat their snack together. Parents receive an email every month about their own child. It is hoped that the parents will respond to the email. Loraine described the planning as ‘organic’ which is very much in keeping with other early years settings that I visited in New Zealand.  Some documentation is kept by staff, a reflective dialogue folder and a self-review folder. The Self Review folder will be inspected by ERO.

 

Wonder ignites Curiosity, Curiosity ignites Exploration, Exploration ignites Critical Thinking.

We discussed the fact that other settings take children from the main floor for direct teaching sessions when they are getting ready to transition to school. This setting were not in favour of this routine as it was felt that if the curriculum is rich then there is no need to provide an alternative one.

I learnt of one of Loris Malaguzzi’s (founder of Reggio Emilia preschools) sayings, which is ‘To notice is to reveal’ and wondered if this could be a rationale for learning stories. The learning stories are based on

  • To NOTICE – what are you seeing
  • To RECOGNISE – what learning are you seeing
  • To RESPOND- Which is the next steps

I learnt that this is the usual structure of all learning stories. In this setting, it was very well understood that the individual practitioner drives the style and content of a learning story.  Loraine told me that she was ‘not one for rostas and templates’. She felt that Te Whariki was ‘…a confused document’.  Perhaps the current review of Te Whariki will enlighten us.

‘Narrative assessment helps children know who they are’ (Loraine)

It was suggested to me that as the children have photographs to refer to, they would attach their own labels very quickly (Loriaine). In addition, the photographs enable the viewer to see relationships.  

I was signposted to Kei Tua o te pae (Assessment for learning) which gives guidance on learning stories.  I took a quick look at the mathematics section, which was very detailed.  I did not find any such focused learning stories on my travels finding instead that they focused more on dispositions rather than particular curriculum areas.  Interestingly, ERO echoed this finding and  produced a report on Mathematics in early years settings based on  evidence gathered on their inspections.

 

I hope you enjoy the photographs. 

 

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Edited by WChurchill, 09 November 2016 - 11:02 PM.


#107 Helen

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 08:45 AM

I've just spent the last hour catching up and reading your posts - and have been thoroughly captivated. What an incredible experience you managed to organise! Thank you so much for creating something very unique on the FSF.

I'm very fired up about dispositions again....off to do some more reading!


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#108 WChurchill

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 11:12 PM

Thank you very much for your reply Helen. I was really focused whilst in NZ and wrote my notes
regularly. Since I have been home it has been more difficult to write them up as it is incredibly busy.I was in Serbia last week and I am looking forward to visiting early years settings in Slovenia next
week. I am determined to write up the NZ experiences but maybe not as quick as I would like!

I'll check and see if I can post some photos from Slovenia!

#109 WChurchill

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Posted 04 December 2016 - 11:46 AM

I have been so busy since getting back from New Zealand, I still have some experiences of inspirational settings I visited there to share with you all.

 

For now though, building on a recent trip to Serbia, I had the great fortune to take part in a study trip to Slovenia.

 

I am putting on just a few photographs from a Waldorf school that we visited.  They were very kind in allowing us to take photographs as long as we obviously did not have any photographs with children.  The wool in the photograph, I have not seen before and the staff explained that if you mix it with soap it becomes malleable.  The art work posted was made with this material.

 

I love the pram which I saw at another setting.  They are pushed by just one member of staff.  Great to keep you fit!

 

One of the main points of interest for me was a conversation relayed to me by my colleague.  It was felt that  although there are government guidelines, there is great scope to interpret these and  make them suitable and beneficial for there own setting.   This issue of professionalism and local democracy is a growing interest for me.  One conversation that I had with a member of staff was how they work with children from where they are and there was not pressure to achieve targets.   They felt they want to develop children to the best of their ability and this very much part of the setting's philosophy and aspirations rather than being imposed on them.

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Edited by WChurchill, 04 December 2016 - 11:48 AM.


#110 WChurchill

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 08:40 PM

Just a little tongue in cheek humorous look at paperwork culture in schools.

 

https://m.youtube.co...eature=youtu.be







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