Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
What's New
Articles
Resources
About Us
Tapestry

Recommended Posts

Hi

 

Does anyone else not set next steps?

 

We are a very small group with only 13 children on roll so we know the children very well. The same staff work every session.

 

We found that when setting next steps, staff were constantly looking for children achieving them but missing other learning that was taking place and some children were not achieving them for quite a while, particularly those that only attend for 3 hours a week!

 

We have not been doing them since Christmas and we have observed a lot more learning and the children are happy, engaged and progressing well.

 

However, we have our improvement advisor on our backs so I just wanted to know if anyone else doesn't do them and how do you justify why you don't?

 

Thanks

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We do very informal in the moment (without paperwork) next steps. Our planning is one A4 sheet for the week. (50 children on roll 26 per session) We talk to parents a lot! :lol:

 

We had Ofsted in Jan - she loved the fact all the staff knew all the children really well, and our lack of paperwork didn't seem to bother her in the least. The trouble with this though- is that no two inspectors are the same !! :angry:

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No next steps for us either - best thing I ever did as I found the same with things being missed :) Now we are seeing the children much more as a whole, noticing much more about what they can do and what they need support with :)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The question is; Can you demonstrate that children are making good or better progress across all areas, inorder to meet the ELGs by the end of the EYFS and how do you know.

What comes next would most likely be determined as securing a range of skills or developing a new range of skills that lead, don't forget towards the ELGs.

Development Matters was not designed for small scale steps - each item is a broad developmental stage which could take months to attain so you would know what you are working on and towards.

Having said that I think every seting would be different and 30 child reception class some recording might be necessary to simply remember it all!!

Cx

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The question is; Can you demonstrate that children are making good or better progress across all areas, inorder to meet the ELGs by the end of the EYFS and how do you know.

What comes next would most likely be determined as securing a range of skills or developing a new range of skills that lead, don't forget towards the ELGs.

Development Matters was not designed for small scale steps - each item is a broad developmental stage which could take months to attain so you would know what you are working on and towards.

Having said that I think every seting would be different and 30 child reception class some recording might be necessary to simply remember it all!!

Cx

 

Yes - I should add we do have a tracker for each child, filled in termly. This information is added to a master spread-sheet which is available for all staff to see easily- so we can see what areas/skills need developing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We use a tracker for each child as well - 2 A3 sheets with all the development matters on so you can see at a glance exactly where a child is at any point in time and where they need extra support etc :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We abandoned next steps last September...but we've gone back to them! We found that our planning and observations lacked focus without them. I think it's because we have very mixed attendance with some children coming 3 hours a week and some 50 (we're full daycare). We needed something to guide and focus us on how to move children on, and found that next steps (and some adult-led activities, which we'd also abandoned) have done this. Just shows we all work in different ways to find the best way for our children and staff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the idea of 'on-the-spot' next steps, where learning is extended as and when appropriate throughout the sessions. This of course happens anyway, but may not be used in documentation. An example might be where a child is playing with a musical instrument, so you sit with them and join in - maybe you show them how to use an instrument, how to vary the sounds the instruments make, how to tap out a beat (you play, they copy) or whatever is developmentally appropriate for the child. When you write your observation, also write what you did to extend their learning, and there is your evidence of creating and working towards next steps

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the idea of 'on-the-spot' next steps, where learning is extended as and when appropriate throughout the sessions. This of course happens anyway, but may not be used in documentation. An example might be where a child is playing with a musical instrument, so you sit with them and join in - maybe you show them how to use an instrument, how to vary the sounds the instruments make, how to tap out a beat (you play, they copy) or whatever is developmentally appropriate for the child. When you write your observation, also write what you did to extend their learning, and there is your evidence of creating and working towards next steps

 

Yepp that exactly what we do - however we never have the time to actually write it up - and if I'm honest I cant really see the point in writing everything up. :o . We put a note with child's initials on the planning sheet to remind us to put certain resources out again, and we try and mention it to parents at collection. Sometimes we'll take a photo but not every time as we cant afford the printing cost. ::1a

 

If a child is struggling, or there is SEN then things are done more formally.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Yepp that exactly what we do - however we never have the time to actually write it up - and if I'm honest I cant really see the point in writing everything up. :o . We put a note with child's initials on the planning sheet to remind us to put certain resources out again, and we try and mention it to parents at collection. Sometimes we'll take a photo but not every time as we cant afford the printing cost. ::1a

 

If a child is struggling, or there is SEN then things are done more formally.

It' good for parental engagement via Learning Journeys (or similar) and record keeping to give a global picture of each child in the setting. Let's be honest, we can't remember everything about every child!

I know of a place that uses a big whiteboard for all their daily and weekly planning, where practitioners add to it and adapt it as and when necessary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We do next steps every fortnight. They tend to be things that we are already working on but need to consolidate and develop a bit . So I have

a little chap toilet training...N/S to toilet regularly

one starting to write name .... N/S to write first 4 letters of name with correct formation

one who can count to 3....N/S to count to 5

etc etc

 

these form the basis of planning so if I have loads doing fm skills then I will also make sure we have lots of opportunities for this around. On top of this we would have continuous provision based on what the children are showing interest in and then we'll throw in extras....we had marshmallow playdough today!!!!!

 

I find without any next steps we flounder a bit and I feel a bit lost! but then we do have 60 children to keep track of

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the idea of 'on-the-spot' next steps, where learning is extended as and when appropriate throughout the sessions. This of course happens anyway, but may not be used in documentation. An example might be where a child is playing with a musical instrument, so you sit with them and join in - maybe you show them how to use an instrument, how to vary the sounds the instruments make, how to tap out a beat (you play, they copy) or whatever is developmentally appropriate for the child. When you write your observation, also write what you did to extend their learning, and there is your evidence of creating and working towards next steps

 

For me that is teaching! That's what good teachers do all the time - assess, plan and do in the moment alongside all the other planning they do when they reflect on the effectiveness of their work with children and did the children make progress that session, day, week, term... Good sustained shared thinking is good teaching! (I'm using teacher in the broadest educator sense here obvs)

Cx

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

For me that is teaching!

I completely agree! It's exactly how good pedagogy should look (imo), it just gets lost in translation to paperwork sometimes!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×